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Building new home! What would be ideal setup?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Gofastr, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. unixguru

    unixguru Godfather

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    Jul 9, 2007
    Wouldn't that be the norm?
     
  2. TMan

    TMan Legend

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    Oct 30, 2007
    My home was built in 2002, and they let me mark on the studs where I wanted double CAT5 runs placed. At each location, one was intended for phone, the other for network. I did the same for dual RG6 runs, as that was obviously pre-SWiM.

    Of course, the idiots terminated all my network runs into a 110 block, just like the phone runs. Yeah, that was helpful. I had to hire someone to rip half of them out of the 110 and terminate them in a proper patch panel like it was supposed to be. They just barely left enough slack for that to be done, too.
     
  3. wingrider01

    wingrider01 Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 9, 2005
    Since my hosue was not part of a builders subdivision I contracted out to a company that specialized in the work. Cost 1500.00 for the entire job
     
  4. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    Dec 28, 2007
    Isn't that how it always works?
     
  5. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    Dec 28, 2007
    They aren't building too many new houses around here due to the recession. I live in a well populated metro area. I have no interest in living out in the middle of nowhere. You kind of have to go with the builder thats selling the house with the floor plan that you like in the area that you like.

    When I built my house and I went to the design center to customize, I'm sure the agent thought I was cheap or something because I scoffed at the majority of the options they offered me due to price. I think they wanted $1500 for a mid range refrigerator in 2002 or something. At the store, they were going for like $1000 at the time.

    I dunno, I didn't like $150 a pull. I mean the walls were completely open at the time. There wasn't a single piece of dry wall. The guy spent all of 10 minutes running it. I did buy one pull... an extra RG6 cable from the attic to the living room because I knew it would be impossibe to do after the walls were closed without ripping half the house apart.

    That being said, running cable is best done when the walls are open to avoid patching... but if you want to do a lot of custom pulls, I dunno... gotta factor in the drywall patching and the mess. Lots of dry wall patching guys out there, but very few that can match textures well from my experience.
     
  6. Dahammer

    Dahammer Cool Member

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    Nope. Some of us still build our homes on our own property, as I did this one in 2008. Most builders around here don't own anything, they build custom homes on a cost plus basis. Since they work for us, they build it how we want it.
     
  7. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    Dec 28, 2007
    In my area (southern california), a bunch of builders bid on a giant parcel of land that the city or county or whoever owns. The owner decides who is going to get the land. Then they build a bunch of houses really close together on tiny lots :D, and release them for sale in phases. Typically about 10 to 20 homes in a phase. Typically around 10 to 15 phases. No negotiation on price. You either pay what they want for it, or they go to the next person. You can't even get them to knock off a $1. Any options & customizations you typically pay 2x what they really cost. You can't modify the outside of the house and you can't customize the floor plan beyond really basic stuff. I.e. I closed in a parlor with a wall and door to make it an office. Big stuff like relocate a bathroom or move a wall? No way. Gotta buy a custom home for that.

    Depending on your location, you have to pay anywhere from 1 or 2 home owner association fees and depending on how developed the area was, you might also have to pay a mello roos.

    Gotta love so cal :D.
     
  8. wingrider01

    wingrider01 Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 9, 2005
    Don;t know who I hate worse - lawyers or Home Owners Associations, had a huge fight with the one that owns the subdivision across the road, they originally tried to claim my property was under they "supervision", took 2 years but they lost and had to pay every penny of the cost of the battle plus extra for my time and distress.
     
  9. jkaetz

    jkaetz Cool Member

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    Jan 13, 2010
    Similar story here for LV wiring. $500 for a 5 channel home theater setup, $500 for a cat5 drop in each room and a 5 port hub, yes hub, not switch or router. I told them to piss off. When it came time to do the actual construction, I worked with the general contractor and he let me run some conduit through a few walls to make pulling cable easier after the house was done.

    Using wireless for something that requires low latency and is intolerant of dropped packets is asking for trouble. Not to mention that 802.11ac is not even a standard yet. Run cables and have a trouble free network.
     
  10. Juanus

    Juanus Legend

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    Jun 4, 2007
    I built a new home about three years ago and I had the builder run Cat6 to every location that they would normally put a phone jack. Which figured out to be about two to each room and I specified a couple more in the basement and office area. They charged me 600 for all the runs (16 total), but then they wouldn't cap anything off! That included the phone lines and cable lines. So when I moved in, I had uncapped wires hanging out of the wall. I had to do them all myself. The only good thing that came out of that was that I realized that they used Cat5E for the phone lines. So I got on Google and learned how to terminate ethernet ports (It's pretty easy) and I got on Monoprice and bought some keystone jacks and wall plates, a Patch panel and went to town. I even took some of the phone lines (since they were Cat5E) and put them on the internet patch panel to give me extra lines. And when I called DirecTV to come set me up, I asked the guy to terminate all of my cable lines and now it looks great. But it was a process and at the time, I was pretty upset that they wouldn't terminate anything. My builder got some angry phone calls. I remember I called a local company to see what it would cost to get the whole thing set up. Terminate all the lines and put in a switch and all that. I seem to remember about 1500 bucks. I think I did it much better, especially considering that now the phone lines are Ethernet lines if I want them to be.
     
  11. Dahammer

    Dahammer Cool Member

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    Glad I live in the country. Works much different here. I owned the 4 acres I built this home on for 2 years before I started construction. I went to the bank, got a construction loan and sub contracted the entire building process out myself, giving me total control over it from the ground up.

    Everyone doesn't do it that way though. But even the homes that are being built in the city in subdivisions the buyer has a lot of control over the process and can generally build whatever they want. Not many builders here doing the build to sell thing after the recession. The housing market crash sunk most of those guys.
     

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