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Can I get cable internet along with my DirecTV?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by wxman, Jul 5, 2013.

  1. Jul 5, 2013 #1 of 25
    wxman

    wxman New Member

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    My house was new construction when I bought it, and it was pre-wired for cable. However, I went with D* instead of cable. The installer hooked the satellite dish into the cable entry point into the house.

    I've had no issues with the cabling, and it has worked well for over a decade. I now want to get cable internet since my DSL stinks. However, I'm afraid when the cable installer comes, he will not able able to connect the cable without ruining what the D* installer set up. I like satellite and do not want to get rid of it.

    I have a very simple setup with only 1 HD, non-DVR receiver.

    Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. Jul 5, 2013 #2 of 25
    peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    the Cable guy would need to run a separe coax cable from the outside to either your distribution point if a coax cable is available at the modem location otherwise a new cable must be run to that location. bottom line is that cable and DirecTV cannot coexist on the same cable
     
  3. Jul 5, 2013 #3 of 25
    longrider

    longrider Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Another coax will have to be run into the house. The house prewire is yours, not the cable company so he has no right to touch it. The only issue (if it matters to you) is that I would assume the standard install is just like DirecTV in that it consists of running the coax on the outside of the house and going through the wall at the location you want the cable modem. If concealing the wire is important to you you will have to pay for the wall fishes, etc. The two services can not share the same cable
     
  4. Jul 5, 2013 #4 of 25
    yall2

    yall2 Mentor

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    I have DirecTV and cable internet, no problem. Yes, they are separate coax.
     
  5. Jul 5, 2013 #5 of 25
    wxman

    wxman New Member

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    Thanks for the help so far. You are fast! I do understand they can't run on the same cable. I am a complete novice at wiring, so please forgive my ignorance at the following. :) At the side of the house there's a spot for another connection. I really don't know what it is. I was hoping it was a location to allow another input into the house. In the image below , the black cable coming up from the ground is from the satellite dish. I'm not sure what the top connector is for.

    [​IMG]

    Sorry for the crudeness of the pic. Bottom line is I don't want wires running up the side of the house. I do understand it would cost more to have it done another way.
     
  6. Jul 5, 2013 #6 of 25
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    +1......My DirecTV and Time Warner RoaderRuner are separate coax.
     
  7. Jul 5, 2013 #7 of 25
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Leave the current connection alone and don't let anyone fiddle with it.

    It is likely that there's a splitter somewhere that the DIRECTV installer wired around and you may be able to use one of the cables there to get where you need to go but under no circumstance should the DIRECTV wiring be touched or altered in any way.

    Make sure you thoroughly test both systems before the cable installer leaves.

    Since it appears that you have only a single receiver, you should be golden unless you want the modem in the same room as the receiver. In that case you would need a complete end-to-end cable run.
     
  8. Jul 5, 2013 #8 of 25
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    It might be that there's wire in place that could be used; it appear you have two coax into the house, but they may also be both DIRECTV's.
    If your house was built as part of a development, check with neighbors to learn what you can.
     
  9. Jul 5, 2013 #9 of 25
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    To me, it appears that the beige cable is the lone coax going into the house. I'm not sure what the other cables are that disappear under the siding (one is likely a land line) but the satellite cable is clearly connected to the beige cable.
     
  10. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    I recently did the same thing (got rid of DSL and went with Comcast internet). Because I was using all my pre-wired coax for DirecTV and Comcast had to run a coax through the wall and to my modem, they charged an extra $29.99 for "new install".

    But they both work fine.
     
  11. casinoman59

    casinoman59 Cool Member

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    But buy your own modem and wireless router saves $$$ every month
     
  12. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    I have Cable internet and Directv. I would never have it any other way.
     
  13. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    I'd rather have fiber optic and DIRECTV, thanks!
     
  14. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Maybe I would too ,if I could get it!
     
  15. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Assuming your receiver is connected via SWM (you can find out by hitting '-' on your receiver, it'll show "SWM connected" if it is) there is no reason you couldn't run both the satellite and cable into your house on the same coax. You would then split them up once inside the house using another diplexer.

    But unless you really really want to avoid having another coax run into your house from the outside, it probably isn't worth the hassle since both the cable guy and Directv guy will probably not understand why it is there, assume it should not be there, and will want to bypass it if every time have them out for service. You would need to remove it and connect only "their" cable before they arrive, otherwise they'd probably blame any problems on it because it is the easy way out.

    A lot of people will tell you this won't work because DECA uses the same lower frequency range that cable TV does. But this doesn't matter because 1) you only have the one receiver so you aren't using whole home and 2) even if you had more than one and were using whole home, so long as the diplexer inside your house that separates out the cable precedes any splitters, it won't affect whole home since the DECA communication is between receivers/DVRs/clients, and does not need to reach the LNB.

    You would need a pair of diplexers designed for SWM, the NAS STD-9501M that solidsignal.com sells would work well for this.
     
  16. wxman

    wxman New Member

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    Thanks for all the help. I do not have a SWM since I only have the one non-DVR receiver. Anyway, I really don't want holes drilled in my house, so I may just be stuck with slow internet. Thanks again.
     
  17. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    That is rather a harsh way to look in to this. a rather be on the 21st century with a nice ISP and one small hole, than have to suffer from a slow internet. but to each his/her own
     
  18. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    The average house has holes and openings of various sizes to allow for things like chimneys, vents, doors, windows, plumbing, and electrical but a hole drilled to allow coax concerns you? :sure:
     
  19. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

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    This can work with SWiM and the right diplexers as slice1900 says.

    But be careful your cable internet service is not above a DOCSIS 2.x standard as DOCSIS 3.0 uses frequencies up to 1 GHz which will then interfere with the satellite related signals even with SWIM.
     
  20. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    I wasn't aware of this, thanks for pointing that out. But it wouldn't interfere with satellite frequencies, since the diplexer is going to just block/attenuate CATV frequencies above 900 MHz, so there would be no mixing of signals. Because of this, it may not be a problem in practice.

    I assume DOCSIS works like DSL in that when the connection comes up there's a training phase where it checks all configured channels/frequencies and disables those that don't work properly. That's very important for DSL because things like bridge taps will attenuate various frequency ranges depending on their length, and it'll be different for each connection. Many houses will have bridge taps in their cable plant (lines run off the same splitter as your cable modem that aren't connected) that can cause the same problem, so I don't see how DOCSIS could avoid having a similar training phase. You'd want to power cycle the cable modem after adding the diplexers so the training phase could disable the affected frequency range.

    This would reduce your maximum download speed, but unless you're paying for some crazy fast 300 Mb downloads, having a slightly smaller frequency range to work with wouldn't matter in practice.
     

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