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Can You Spot The Problem In This Picture?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by Manctech, Sep 25, 2010.

  1. Manctech

    Manctech Icon

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    DING DING DING DING!! :D

    I was about to change out the 2 SWM8's for a SWM16 when I saw that. Compressed it down, all tvs worked beautifully. Even passed IV retest.
     
  2. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    When you do so many of them, there are going to be some that get missed. Did a supersized McMansion a couple of days ago. Used close to 100 fittings (stupid LV contractor put twist ons everywhere). That was fun replacing them all.
     
  3. barryb

    barryb New Member

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    Yeah, but did anyone find Waldo?
     
  4. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    Upper left, next to the table with the shoes
     
  5. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    I caught that in my first reply (post #5).
     
  6. raoul5788

    raoul5788 Guest

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    Why do you call it swaging, just to sound smarter than the rest of us? Swaging really is a different process.
     
  7. jdspencer

    jdspencer Hall Of Fame

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    Must be a regional thing! :)
     
  8. barryb

    barryb New Member

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    A really different process in fact.

    The correct term here is compression.
     
  9. raoul5788

    raoul5788 Guest

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    I think it's a basset hound thing! :lol:
     
  10. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    I call it swaging because that's what it is.

    When you draw a collar over a tube to reduce the size (or draw a mandrel through a tube to increase the size) of the material, that's swaging.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swaging

    See more at "blind fasteners" (Pop Rivets, Huck Bolts).
     
  11. barryb

    barryb New Member

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    I digress.
     
  12. raoul5788

    raoul5788 Guest

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    That's not the same thing as compressing a fitting over a cable.
     
  13. jdspencer

    jdspencer Hall Of Fame

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  14. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Both processes have to do with compression but are applied at 90ยบ from each other.
     
  15. Manctech

    Manctech Icon

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    Jul 5, 2010
    Yea I overlooked it because I had no idea what you were talking about.
     
  16. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    A short history on compression connectors:

    The first compression connectors were "radial compression connectors":

    [​IMG]

    And used a compression tool where the die was part of the tool:

    [​IMG]

    The connector is slid on to a prepared coax cable, and then placed inside the tool. The tool is compressed, forcing the end of the connector into the tapered die inside the tool, where the end of the connector is swaged down to a tight fit on the cable.

    [​IMG]

    The problem with this method is that it required a big, heavy, expensive tool.

    Thomas & Betts, and later many others, took this idea and made compression connectors where the die was built into the connector itself, so that the tool could be simplified, making it strictly a compression tool. A Digicon compression connector is virtually identical to the taper compression connectors above, except that a plastic die with a brass reinforcement ring is added to the end. The compression tool forces the aluminum end-piece of the connector into the die, swaging it onto the cable.

    [​IMG]
    Taper compression connector.

    [​IMG]
    Digicon modern compression connector, uncompressed.

    [​IMG]
    Digicon modern compression connector, compressed.

    Other brands of connectors use varying methods to seal the connector on the cable, but most use a variation of this idea.
     
  17. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

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    I'm still a little bit confused on what each of the coaxial lines coming from SWM output 2 of each module are feeding?

    It seems that the tuners for the nine receivers mentioned in the install are accounted for by the total number of splitter output coax connections.
     
  18. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    Great info. Is there a certain type or brand that D* installers are suppose to use?

    Thanks
     
  19. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

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  20. Manctech

    Manctech Icon

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    They go to the SWM Expander in the Middle. The SWM Expander lets you run 2 SWM 8's, allowing up to 16 tuners. Now a days we just use a SWM 16.
     

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