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Carry Disputes

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by Rduce, Nov 29, 2012.

  1. Rduce

    Rduce Legend

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    May 15, 2008
    For any one who feels that Dish selfishly or greedily pulls channels or refuses to “just pay what the provider wants” I would point out that Direct is currently in the same situation that Dish was recently in with Gannett broadcasting. With the deadline tomorrow night, while three stations in my DMA are slated to disappear from Charter’s lineup this afternoon at 5.

    These disputes are only going to become more numerous as ad revenues dry up as content providers scramble to cover their over priced costs in an era where savvy consumers are cutting the cord and finding alternate means to satisfy their entertainment means.

    While, I find it amusing that many continually bash Dish’s stand on these disputes, I can only imagine how much they would complain if the services were to just agree to whatever the provider asked for and passed the costs on without a care about their customers.

    The next time your favorite channel is about to go missing just remember this is only television and in the grander scheme of things it is meaningless...
     
  2. rocat1997

    rocat1997 Cool Member

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    While I want to agree I cannot. They used their customers as a negotiating tool. The paying customer should never be involved. I paid to see AMC. I was never compensated for the loss. When you pay for a product, you expect it to be delivered or your bill adjusted. Both Directv and Dish as well as any broadcaster never look at the outcome but the bottom line. It's all a out money. I shouldn't be put in the middle of the dispute. I pay for a service, I should get what I pay for. No excuse.
     
  3. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Jun 6, 2009
    No, you didn't. You pay Dish a monthly subscription rate for a package of channels that are subject to change at any time. Short of any of the premium or ala-carte optional channels, you are not paying for any specific channel if your package.
     
  4. runner861

    runner861 Icon

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    Mar 20, 2010
    Write to Congress. Get them to change the law regarding carriage of local stations. Make all local stations must-carry, rather than retransmission consent. Of course, be prepared to face off against the NAB, which has a lot more money to line the pockets of our members of Congress than anybody here does.
     
  5. rocat1997

    rocat1997 Cool Member

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    May 17, 2011
    You can twist the words however you like, but, I bought a package for a single channel. So yes I paid for that channel. Disputes should never use the customers as leverage. We missed an entire season of a show. The least they could have done is re-aired it. They didn't. Once again. Made the consumer pay for their problem. This is not good business. I'm in a business that customer service is serious business. I expect no less than I provide.
     
  6. tampa8

    tampa8 Godfather/Supporter

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    Mar 30, 2002
    You can word it any way you want, but you bought a package, not a channel. That you only want that specific channel means nothing, Dish, Direct, Comcast - whoever does not guarantee you will get any specific channel. And I think you know that. You have a choice, you don't have to sign a contract, and you can still get the services then drop them anytime you would like.
     
  7. Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 Active Member

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    No. You pay for a service. You have received that service. The service provider is paying for the right to retransmit specific channels, while you are merely paying the service provider for access to what content they have available at any given time. If you were paying for individual channels, your bill would have gone up instantly every single time a channel was added to a package you subscribe to. No particular channels were ever guaranteed to you. If you believed they were, then that is an error on your part. This has only been the way it works for about 30 years now...so it's well known.

    How exactly was Dish Network supposed to re-air an entire season of a show they do not own the broadcast rights to? Something they have no legal right to do.
     
  8. Slamminc11

    Slamminc11 Hall Of Fame

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    Jan 27, 2005
    Seriously?!? You do know that Dish has no control over what program a channel shows right? If you are pissed because you didn't see whatever show and you want it replayed then your complaint needs to be with the owner of the channel not Dish.
     
  9. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    As hdtvfan0001 posted on another thread, "The DirecTV model seems to be go toe-to-toe for the best settlement. The DISH model seems to be try for a cheaper price and if not successful...pull the channel". Need you be reminded of the DISH vs AMC fiasco? :sure:
     
  10. david_jr

    david_jr Godfather

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    I think you would have to agree that DISH vs AMC fiasco was a lot bigger than just trying for a cheaper price for a channel.
     
  11. fudpucker

    fudpucker Godfather

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    Jul 23, 2007
    NW Iowa
    Although, if you are one of those for whom "It's only television" you're probably not spending time in forums like this. ;)
     
  12. sregener

    sregener Godfather

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    Dish seems to be more willing than DirecTV to pull channels, but I seem to recall DirecTV pulling Viacom earlier this year for a few weeks (which is a far more popular channel group than AMC/Rainbow), so that reputation may be shifting. Anyone involved in the AMC debate knows that there was a lot more going on than just a simple channel transmission dispute, and the exceptional nature of that dispute does not make for a good example of how Dish conducts their business.

    However, in general, if you absolutely need a specific channel and want to play the odds, pay the extra amount DirecTV charges over Dish for similar programming packages that come from the "settle first, control costs second" approach.
     
  13. Rduce

    Rduce Legend

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    May 15, 2008
    Neither Dish, Direct or Charter “pull” channels from their lineups. They are not permitted to carry these channels once an agreement has expired and there is no agreement to continue in place or in some cases an extension during negotiations. The channel owner is the one that “pulls” the channel in these disputes.
     
  14. Max Mike

    Max Mike AllStar

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    Oct 18, 2008
    First Dish should refuse to pay what amounts to a extortion fee for a channel and we will all regret it long term if they do not do that.

    Second there are two parties, if the provider refuses Dish's offer they not Dish are de facto pulling the programming... apply heat to them.

    Thank goodness Dish is willing to try and hold the line on programming price increases.
     
  15. Orion9

    Orion9 Legend

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    Jan 31, 2011
    I've always been on Dish's side in these disputes. The price of TV is high enough already I can't keep up with all the stuff my DVR records. It's very annoying when one of my favorites disappears for awhile, but if Dish avoided this annoyance across each customer's favorite channels, they and we would be paying much more. Then we'd be faced with the question of whether to leave Dish entirely instead of just doing without a channel or two.
     
  16. sregener

    sregener Godfather

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    Apr 17, 2012
    Considering what I paid for satellite service in 1995 - $29.95 - and the number of channels I got, without a DVR or HD, satellite programming today should cost at least double what it does, according to official inflation numbers. That's not double $29.95, but double the package prices you pay today.

    Nobody wants to pay more for anything, but the reality is that we're getting a whole lot more for an inflation-adjusted dollar now than we were then, even as the price has tripled on a dollar-figure basis.
     
  17. sregener

    sregener Godfather

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    Apr 17, 2012
    When contracts expire, they expire. Both parties must abide by the terms and conditions laid out in the contract. Now, in theory a channel owner could decide to permit Dish to continue to provide programming without compensation, but it is hard to imagine a copyright holder choosing to eschew their compensation rights. They could sign a contract extension that retains the compensation under the previous contract for a set period of time, but no one is required to sign an extension.

    Dish sells packages of programming. When they remove a channel from that lineup (by choice, or due to an expiring contract agreement), they are pulling the channel from that package. They are choosing not to renew the contract under terms then offered by the programming provider. They may be right to do so, or they may be stubborn, bull-headed and anti-consumer, but they are no longer providing the channel that they once did in the package. Thus, I stand by my wording that Dish is pulling the channel by declining the contract offer of the channel, and the channel company is simply refusing to give away their copyrighted product.
     
  18. Max Mike

    Max Mike AllStar

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    Oct 18, 2008
    Baloney, inflation on anything but food and fuel has been dang near flat for the last ten years and negative for electronics and such.

    We are not getting a lot more in terms of value what we are getting is a lot more of nothing but worthless derivative crap.

    Rates for TV programming have more than doubled in last 10 years most of those 10 years inflation was 2-3% or less, way less on anything but food and fuel while average incomes. In the last few years incomes are down and down big.

    These price increases are not sustainable and the programmers had better figure that out quickly before cord cutting turns from a trickle in to a flood. Pricing half your customers out of the market is just stupid.
     
  19. Orion9

    Orion9 Legend

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    Jan 31, 2011
    DirectTV was launched in 1994, and Dish Network in 1996, so you were a fairly early adopter. Early adopters generally pay more - usually a LOT more. Can I interest you in my $1500 Betamax? I do still have it - I keep it around to remind me how much I used to blow on being an early adopter. ;)

    But not anymore. These days I agonize over a Blu-Ray player even though it looks orders of magnitudes better and costs less than a tenth as much.
     
  20. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Sep 16, 2006
    I only paid $1200 for mine, and like you, it still works. Paid $800 for my first DirecTv 18" dish and RCA receiver too.
     

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