1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Coax Question

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by RNP, Jan 11, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. RNP

    RNP New Member

    3
    0
    Jan 6, 2006
    Can I use the new RG6 QUAD COAX?
     
  2. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,524
    958
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    D* specifies solid copper center conductor for the new HD dish installations. Some quad shield RG6 may have that while some may not. I used quad shield RG6 for all the wiring in my house due to very strong local tv station interference, however it does not meet the new requirements because it is not solid copper core. (But I am not using the new dish either.)
    -
    For most installations, quad shield is not needed. If you do need it, and plan to go with the AT9 dish, make sure you get solid copper core. How much difference that will make in actual usage I don't know, but you should at least plan to meet the spec requirement.
    -
    Carl
     
  3. dsanbo

    dsanbo Legend

    181
    0
    Nov 25, 2005
    The crew that did my AT9 install said if the coax run is less than 100', there should be no problem using copper-clad steel....but....solid copper IS the best choice if installing new....(I lucked out....the existing runs I have are solid copper.....)
     
  4. RNP

    RNP New Member

    3
    0
    Jan 6, 2006
    You can get copper core RG-6 QUAD coax cable and the gold compression ends made by Z for this coax at L
     
  5. JLucPicard

    JLucPicard Hall Of Fame

    3,985
    0
    Apr 27, 2004
    Sorry for this qeustion. I know RS, CC, and BB, but "Z" and "L"? A little help, please?
     
  6. greywolf

    greywolf DBSTalk Club Member

    527
    0
    Jul 13, 2005
    Zenith, Lowes.
     
  7. RCKYMTN

    RCKYMTN AllStar

    61
    0
    Jan 14, 2006

    So how do you know if you have the solid copper cable? I have the RG-6, but not sure?? And is the solid copper cable absolutely necessary for the AT9 dish, or are people getting by with existing RG6 that may not be the solid copper.

    thanks..
     
  8. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,524
    958
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    DirecTV specifies the solid copper.
    -
    I'm sure that copper covered steel will work just fine in many, if not most, situations. If you are doing the upgrade to HD yourself, you have to make your decision. If DirecTV is doing the upgrade, the installer is supposed to run solid copper. I'm sure some will avoid doing so if they can get away with it.
    -
    One person suggested using a magnet to check the center conductor. If it is copper covered steel, the magnet will stick.
    -
    Carl
     
  9. dsanbo

    dsanbo Legend

    181
    0
    Nov 25, 2005
    The copper-clad steel is an acceptable alternative to solid copper if the run is around 100' or less (and good compression fittings are used). I used the magnet "trick" with a scrap piece of the original RG/6 I found after the (original) installer left....;)
     
  10. greywolf

    greywolf DBSTalk Club Member

    527
    0
    Jul 13, 2005
    I have a magnet taken from an old hard drive. The thing is amazing. I went to Lowe's and the big cable rolls were plastic wrapped. The magnet fell off the Zenith RG6 QS 250' roll and the 250' Magnavox RG6 with messenger roll. The messenger wire must be bronze. It stuck to everything else even through the dielectric as long as the entire area of the magnet was on cable.
     
  11. RCKYMTN

    RCKYMTN AllStar

    61
    0
    Jan 14, 2006
    Thanks for the input.., sounds like I should be ok. I think my RG6 is the steel coated type, but the longest run I have would be 100' feet max.


    Thanks again, gives me some comfort knowing I won't have to re-wire when I go with the AT9 dish and keep my existing RG 6 cabling..
     
  12. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

    7,347
    243
    Oct 1, 2003
    Phoenix, AZ
    Can you please elaborate on this a bit. What exactly do you do with the magnet, what is the magnet "trick"? Thanks.
     
  13. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,524
    958
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    See post #8 above.

    Carl
     
  14. greywolf

    greywolf DBSTalk Club Member

    527
    0
    Jul 13, 2005
    Or #10.
     
  15. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

    7,347
    243
    Oct 1, 2003
    Phoenix, AZ
    Ok so if the magnet sticks its ok to use that type of cable??
     
  16. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,524
    958
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    Just the opposite. If the magnet sticks, you have copper covered steel. If the magnet does not stick, you have all copper (well, actually all it really means is you don't have steel).

    And to give credit where it is due, I believe it was Greywolf who originally suggested the magnet trick.

    Carl
     
  17. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

    7,347
    243
    Oct 1, 2003
    Phoenix, AZ
    And all copper is good and that is what you want to use?

    Ok, I got its now, just a little slow here. :D
     
  18. AllieVi

    AllieVi Hall Of Fame

    1,530
    0
    Apr 10, 2002
    An easy way to tell the difference is to expose a bit of the center conductor. A copper wire will bend easily with your fingers. Copper coated steel will not.
     
  19. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

    7,347
    243
    Oct 1, 2003
    Phoenix, AZ
    How easy will it bend? :D

    What do the cable co's usually use? I just tried to bend a piece of coax from the cable co and it didn't bend that easy.
     
  20. AllieVi

    AllieVi Hall Of Fame

    1,530
    0
    Apr 10, 2002
    Very easy. You won't feel much resistance.

    Cable companies usually (always?) use copper-coated steel. It has significant advantages as far as the cable company is concerned. They need to pull long sections of cable through conduits. Steel withstands the stress without stretching. A solid copper wire might permanently stretch, causing its diameter to decrease. It's important that the diameter of that conductor be what it was when manufactured for the cable to perform properly (i.e., have a 75-ohm characteristic impedance).

    For people installing cables in their own home, that's not a big concern. I did all my own wiring and used quad-shield solid copper RG-6 cables everywhere. The only downside I see is a more expensive installation.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page