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Comcast & DoD...

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Ken S, Aug 27, 2007.

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  1. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    Ken,

    I agree in part...it's always risky to put your pipeline on a competitor's property. But, on the other side...Comcast does get compensated...subscribers pay for the service...and many will upgrade to higher speeds because of services like this.
     
  2. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Nov 15, 2005

    yes there is a moderator in the house.... but I am going to leave it here, as it has a direct corolation to the new DirecTV On Demand feature.

    So while yes... at any other time, I would agree that it needs to go in the public discussion area... for right now, I am going to let it stay here..

    Since a LOT of users are coming to see the First Look, and I would also like them to see this thread as well..

    As a MOVED->Redirect will fall of the front page in less then a day
     
  3. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    Understood, Ken, but the reasons you put your post in a D* forum apply to all
    l high-speed internet users, independent of provider. The topic is of broader
    interest than just to D* subs, therefor deserves, no, needs a wider readership.

    I try to look at the big picture, never-the-less, my point is moot as Earl has spoken.
     
  4. HIPAR

    HIPAR Icon

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    These kinds of stories are proof that all of the talk about internet delivery of video will render DVDs, satellite, over-the-air obsolete is pure nonsense.

    --- CHAS
     
  5. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    HIPAR,

    Yep, I agree. All this stuff about motorized carriages is nonsense too! What next they'll put the moving pictures on a box in my living room?

    C'mon
     
  6. chakaw

    chakaw Cool Member

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    I love my Verizon FiOS. Dumped Comcast as soon as they turned it on in my hood.
     
  7. dbmaven

    dbmaven Icon

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    [​IMG]

    And it's not just COMCAST.

    As has been posted, Cox has download limits - but at least they're upfront about what they are.

    TWC (RoadRunner) has supposedly started to implement traffic shaping technology - which "apparently" only kicks in when traffic is high and nodes are close to being saturated.

    It's difficult to get a real read on whether this is true or not, since any slowdown is immediately blamed on "traffic shaping" since that's the popular thing to do.....:nono2: After "officially" announcing it, they backtracked - now it appears that it's in some sort of limited test in certain franchises.

    Not that you want to read the whole thread, but here it is: http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r18...lly-Announces-Packet-Shaping-for-All-RR-Users

    Maybe the title of the thread should be changed - because it is going to impact a lot more than just Comcast subs...
     
  8. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    IPTV is far from a joke.... it is just in it's infancy.

    I have had an IPTV service in the past (two actually).
    I have canceled both... as they ultimately "niche" content.

    DVDs (or more appropriately, stored pre-recorded material) is not going anywhere....

    Broadcast programming: be it Satellite, OTA, Cable... none of them are going anywhere anytime soon.

    But OnDemand and VOD based products like this... are going to be here to stay. Microsoft (With XBOX360), Sony (with PS3), Comcast, Time Warner, Amazon, Netflix, DirecTV, DishNetwork..... all of these people are in the "game" now.

    On a conceptual level... it is fantastic.... a VAST hugh library of content, available at your finger tips... yes it may take some time for that library to download, and you be able to watch it... But we are not talking days, or spending $6 in gas to go to the video store, to spend another $6 on the rental.... Or waiting a few days for it to show in the mail, and hope that it is playable.

    It also is a fantastic idea for some producers of shows.... how many TV shows are canceled in their first three weeks... some shows that have the potential to be good... but are slotted wrong, wrong network, or maybe they just didn't gel.

    VOD is a low cost option for those shows... to continue their showings and see if they can build a following, and maybe make it back to broadcast air, or maybe just continue in the VOD world... as another "channel".

    As the internet infrustructure continues to get updated... better switches, better technology, ect.... think back 15/20 years ago... the closest we came to "email" was BBS using FIFO net... and it would take almost as long as snail mail to get to it's destination....

    Now we are downloading full length feature films in High Definition movies, in hours..... As technology improves, this "feature" will also improve...

    Now, sorry about that..... :backtotop

    COMCAST - If they start to shutdown people's ISPs for un-disclosed limits, and don't provide a way to monitor that usage.. .that can be auditted... Then they are being very very stupid....

    An analogy: It would be like having your drivers license suspended and car taken away; Because you were speeding...... in an area where there was no speed limit sign, and your speedometor was not working.

    Aka: You don't know what the limit is... and you have no way to know if you are getting to that limit


    And my argument is NOT about limits... they can have their limits.
    But if they are going to say "unlimited"... but then have a limit... that is an issue.
     
  9. Bob Coxner

    Bob Coxner Icon

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    Ah, memories! But, it was FidoNet, not FifoNet. :) I still have friends that I met through the FidoNet interest groups. I think I first started using it in 1987.

    For the kiddies in the audience:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FidoNet
     
  10. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    It's been 15+ years since I used it last.... thanks for the correction...
     
  11. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    One thing's for sure, everything up to now has been a prelude. I could not have guessed 20 years ago what would be available to me at my desk, and I can't even imagine what it will be like in 20 years.
     
  12. HIPAR

    HIPAR Icon

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    I'm fairly certain that the core internet isn't broken and can expand to handle future load demands. It's the ISP's that are broken. When everyone starts wanting to watch IP HDTV at 17 megabits per second, every 'garden variety' subscriber will unwitting become a bandwidth hog reaching their bit cap in just a few hours of use.

    Comcast in Connecticut can't handle routine traffic now where my brother's internet cable service is so poor that Firefox often times out before a connection can be established. My Verizon DSL started with download speeds of 740 kilobits per second and has been steadily been decreasing over the last two years. It's not my line so there's a bottleneck somewhere and it's not going to get better in the foreseeable future. Heck, even this forum is becoming overloaded by relatively low bandwidth traffic.

    The ISPs are so oversold so they have no choice but to dump the hogs lest they lose the masses. While the masses are willing to pay, ISPs aren't going to pay for infrastructure upgrades.

    Let's check what's happening ten years from now.

    --- CHAS
     
  13. bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

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    Bainbridge...
    Ah, memories of addresses containing ! and running Crynwr ethernet drivers in DOS.
     
  14. LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    I agree. I have Comcast but I happen to live in an area that has relatively modern infrastructure and relatively low saturation rate. I pay for the 6 meg service with PowerBoost (or whatever they're calling it these days) up to 12 mbps in bursts. My burst speed is actually closer to 14 - 15 mpbs and sustained downloads run around 8 mbps if the delivering server can handle it.

    That said, I'm sure I'm going to hit a wall with DoD at some point and if I get a nastygram, I'm going to reply with one of my own on my letterhead, citing a few well-chosen FTC regulations and my state's consumer protection act. We'll see how they respond. If they cancel me, I'll switch to DSL and wait for FIOS. And then I'll sue the *******s. :)
     
  15. lobofanina

    lobofanina AllStar

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    I think any pay site on the internet might disagree with with you. Be it adult, Wall Street Journal, NYTimes,(a few weeks ago) Netflix watch now features, World of Warcraft, DirecTV on Demand, etc.
     
  16. lobofanina

    lobofanina AllStar

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    duplicate :grin:
     
  17. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

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    I would 'rethink' that analogy: Every State has maximum speed limits ( the one where I live right now it's 20MPH), variable from that point ONLY where the limit is posted. No sign? Sorry, state law says 20MPH. Most every city within the state modifies that to a minimum of 25 to 35 or thereabouts, but keeps the 'if no sign then the state maximum applies' rules.

    Second, every state, even those with yearly (or bi-yearly) vehicle inspection laws put the working (or not) gauges directly in the responsibility of the operator.

    In short, you will lose. As one can see with the original topic, the large carriers are protecting themselves with binding arbitration, and making sure that any suit will be heard in a court they control.
     
  18. LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    Nope. The laws that govern speed and the specific infractions and penalties such infractions incur are all published and easily-ascertainable. Not so with Comcast's secret caps.

    Fortunately for consumers, most state courts still recognize something called a "contract of adhesion" when they see one, as well as contract terms which are "unconscionable." Not ALL those arbitration clauses are being found to be enforceable.

    Of course, laws may vary in your jurisdiction - consult with a licensed attorney where you live and no legal advice is intended by the above information. DO NOT TAUNT HAPPY FUN BALL! :)
     
  19. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    I may "lose" in the court system, and would probably never attempt it...

    But in the court of public opinion (which has a much bigger impact to them)... "arbitration", has no barring.
     
  20. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    Earl,

    The problem comes when they don't cap it and instead use packet priority or other little tricks to make the service slow. Sure, you can potentially switch to DSL...which can also be doing the same thing if they too are offering a competing service.

    If it gets bad enough Congress could get involved and then we're all in real trouble :)
     
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