Converting Genie client HDMI output to component

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by EverSharp, Jun 8, 2021.

  1. Jun 8, 2021 #1 of 17
    EverSharp

    EverSharp New Member

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    Currently one of my Genie clients is having a HDMI handshake problem with an old (first generation) HD TV. Does anyone know whether this problem can be bypassed if I convert the HDMI output to component? Apparently ATT no longer distributes Genie clients with component output.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Jun 8, 2021 #2 of 17
    studechip

    studechip Godfather

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    You could try an HDMI to component cable, don't know if it would work though. The easy solution is getting a new tv!
     
  3. Jun 8, 2021 #3 of 17
    west99999

    west99999 Icon

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    You need a 10-pin component cable. Unless your client is 4k it won't have component.
     
  4. Jun 9, 2021 #4 of 17
    EverSharp

    EverSharp New Member

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    I was told by ATT that the only client that has a 10-pin out is the wireless model. Wired clients have no component out. Can this be true? I find it very strange.
     
  5. Jun 9, 2021 #5 of 17
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    Look at the client and see the label on it. What is the model number ?
    What is the resolution capability of the old TV ?
    What output for the resolution do you have the client set up for ? Have you tried setting the output to 720p ?

    Converter Link: New 1080P HDMI To 5RCA RGB Component YPbPr Video Adapter + R/L Audio Converter | eBay
     
  6. Jun 9, 2021 #6 of 17
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Beware of the HDCP support on an HDMI to component converter. The one that jimmie57 mentions only handles HDMI 1.2 and that's probably not sufficient. I suspect this is why its example uses mostly involve non-DRM content.

    I expect that DIRECTV wants at least HDCP 2.0.
     
  7. Jun 9, 2021 #7 of 17
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    Since you are having a problem that should mean that you have an HDMI connection on your TV. ????
    If yes, get a powered splitter that does the HDCP 2.0.
    This way the splitter sends back the answer that yes it does the HDCP and the signal will go on thru the splitter.

    If it is doing it when you first turn on the TV and the client, turn on the TV with it's own remote first and then turn on the client. The TV might be taking too long to warm up and fully working.
     
  8. Jun 9, 2021 #8 of 17
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Splitters are supposed to report the greatest common feature set of all the connected sink devices, not what the splitter itself is capable of.

    I'm pretty what you're suggesting will not work.

    Come to think of it, I'm pretty sure that HDCP is negotiated directly between source (Genie Mini) and sinks (old TV) so that's not going to fool anyone.
     
  9. Jun 9, 2021 #9 of 17
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    I know for sure that we had dozens of people having HDCP issues and almost all of them got a Powered Splitter and it cured their problem.
    This was in 2009-2012 time frame.
     
  10. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Powered splitters may certainly help regenerate a weak signal but they won't fix an lack of the necessary HDCP support An active cable may work better in that case.

    The EDIDs of most of the switches that featured any manner of spoofing a decade ago have been revoked. The recent switches that make some things work typically require a fully compliant display to be connected to the first output and they "forget to disclose" that there's a second display connected.
     
  11. David Ortiz

    David Ortiz Save the Clock Tower!!

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    Wired 4K clients do not have the 10 pin output. Wired HD clients do have it.
     
  12. makaiguy

    makaiguy Icon

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    So does that mean the first (compliant) set has to be turned on, even when you only want to watch the second (noncompliant) one?
     
  13. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Most displays don't respond to handshake requests unless they are "active". In the case of the "forgetful" splitter, this would result in no response to requests.

    Handshaking is a two-edged sword as it can result in a handshaking failure where a device in the chain is not capable as required. As an example if you were using a splitter between an HD display and a UHD display and you wanted to watch something in 4K, the HD display responding that it only had 1080i capability would prevent it. Turning off the HD display allows the 4K handshake to be successful.
     
  14. litzdog911

    litzdog911 Well-Known Member

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  15. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    it does support HDCP 1.3, so you can watch 1080i with it
     
  16. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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  17. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    The requirements for 4K aren't so much dependent on HDCP as HDMI. 4K 60fps needs the 18Gbps bandwidth that comes from HDMI 2.0.

    Remember that HDMI is the carrier and HDCP represents only the Digital Rights Management that gets applied to the content. The content owners demand the best protection they can get so there's not a lot of backwards compatibility.
     

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