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D11 Sat: Launch Date March 19 at 6:48pm ET, Channel 573

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Dave, Jul 20, 2007.

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  1. Aug 24, 2007 #61 of 1715
    donyoop

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    Contrare, the engineers on that one will triple and quadruple check everything. That would be the best one to be on.

    Don
     
  2. Aug 30, 2007 #62 of 1715
    MAVERICK007

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    September 4th
     
  3. Aug 30, 2007 #63 of 1715
    purtman

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    Maverick, this is D 11, not D 10.
     
  4. Aug 30, 2007 #64 of 1715
    bakers12

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    What happens to D11 on Sept. 4?
     
  5. Aug 30, 2007 #65 of 1715
    Tom Robertson

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    Nothing happens with D11 on Sept. 4. I'm thinking we have a mis-post.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  6. Sep 5, 2007 #66 of 1715
    bjlc

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    what happened to the December launch?
     
  7. Sep 5, 2007 #67 of 1715
    BNUMM

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    Lyngsat indicates D11 as November of 2007.
     
  8. Sep 6, 2007 #68 of 1715
    Tom Robertson

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    Today's ILS launch incident will most certainly cause a delay, perhaps short I hope, as both SeaLaunch and ILS have had engine problems this year. If this clears quickly, maybe D11 won't be delayed much, but if this rolls backs more engine problems, I gotta believe SeaLaunch will require re-inspection of the engine inventory. :(

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  9. Sep 6, 2007 #69 of 1715
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    I believe your take is right on.

    Certainly D*TV has to be concerned, but the reality is with all the double checks at both launch sites now after their "incidents", they'll make sure all is well.
     
  10. Sep 6, 2007 #70 of 1715
    txtommy

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  11. Sep 6, 2007 #71 of 1715
    Sixto

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  12. Sep 6, 2007 #72 of 1715
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    And this is why D* (and most prudent companies) spread the risk and try to use multiple launch services for their spacecraft.

    Technical aside: It's also a very good example of why Russian launches can be so dangerous - that first stage is filled with hydrazine and even a normal shutdown and separation drops a few tons of contaminated debris across the steppes. That stuff is so deadly that a few drops on the skin or a few parts per million in the air is enough to make you seriously ill and much more will kill you very, very quickly. The second and third stages are normally well downrange and vented to vacuum before any debris falls, but in this case both would have been full when they impacted, unless the rocket broke up in the upper atmosphere and the propellants mixed and combusted - if you remember seeing footage of the Challenger disaster in 1986, the orange-red fireball seen immediately after the obscuring white clouds of vapor were similar propellants mixing and burning as the shuttle orbiter vehicle came apart.

    And after those happy thoughts, we now return you to your regularly-scheduled D11 anticipation: Go SeaLaunch! :)
     
  13. Sep 6, 2007 #73 of 1715
    txtommy

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    Also it's just one of the million plus reasons that DTV won't (can't) give a firm date and time for activation of any satellite even after it is launched. It's rocket science and there are never any promises of success.
     
  14. Sep 6, 2007 #74 of 1715
    MikeR7

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    :rolleyes:

    Counting our lucky stars!!!!:lol:
     
  15. Sep 6, 2007 #75 of 1715
    c152driver

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    Do SeaLaunch and ILS share components? I thought they used completely different vehicles.

    It seems like it's been a tough year for the commercial launch companies. I feel bad for the people that worked on this launch. What a sick feeling it must be to watch a failure like that when you've been preparing for the launch for months or years.
     
  16. Sep 6, 2007 #76 of 1715
    lwilli201

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    I doubt that will cause any delay for Sea Launch. They have a totally different launch vehicle. They have already picked it apart because of the January failure. Unless the Sea Launch November launh goes bad, everything should be go for the December D11 launch, barring any other technical isssues. Like said above, IT IS Rocket Science.
     
  17. Sep 6, 2007 #77 of 1715
    Sixto

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  18. Sep 6, 2007 #78 of 1715
    moonman

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    Well now that they have the necessary parts on hand, here's hoping that they inspect them real good!!.
     
  19. Sep 6, 2007 #79 of 1715
    moonman

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    Proton and Zenit aren't related
     
  20. Sep 6, 2007 #80 of 1715
    txtommy

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    Totally different animals. Don't even burn the same fuel.
     
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