DBSTalk First Look: Multi-Room Viewing Opt-in Beta

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Stuart Sweet, Jan 17, 2010.

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  1. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    :confused: for an internet connection, but not for MRV.
     
  2. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Dripping...
    DECA configs only require the router connection so the STB's on the DECA cloud can access internet functions like DirecTV on Demand, Media Share or TVApps, if you don't need/want access to that it doesn't need a router connection.
     
  3. Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Correct, if you are MRV only with respect to any networking, then you do not need a connection to the router at all. And as VOS noted, even if you do have a connection to the router, the MRV traffic will stay 100% on the DECA cloud without passing through the router.
     
  4. steveken

    steveken Godfather

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    Well, the only reason I brought that up is sometimes even the simplest things can screw the whole kebosh up. For instance, my brother-in-law was over here playing MW2 multiplayer on my PS3 over the wireless in it. Well, I tried to fire up my 360 that is hard wired to the network and get online with it. For some reason, the PS3 was pumping out so much data that the 360 was having one hell of a time connecting to XBOX Live and I wasn't able to get onto Live until I turned off the wireless in the router (Belkin N+, btw). Now, I don't know how much data that game pumps out when playing multiplayer, or how many people were in his match, or how much data the 360 requires to be able to get connected to Live, but I do know that it was enough to stifle my 360's connection to Live. I have been doing networking for years now and know how to set it up right, so I know it wasn't my installation. I think it was just a weird fluke. Anyway, thats the only reason I brought that particular instance up.
     
  5. mikeny

    mikeny Hall Of Fame

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    Thanks for that clarification. Interesting.
     
  6. dhines

    dhines Godfather

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    first, so does the pricing of MRV mean that D* is going to cancel their current E* bashing commercial where they talk about all the misc dish fees?

    :D

    ok, now the serious stuff.

    facts about my internet connection
    - access is via at&t uverse. meaning, it is a wireless / hard wired router / modem.
    - i have ethernet connections running to each of my HD DVR's
    - my HD DVR's are located in 4 different bedrooms and in the livingroom
    - my connections to the HD DVR's are all hooked into one linksys switch
    - the exception is my livingroom where i have an ethernet cable running from the initial switch, then hooking into another linksys switch
    - the additional switch in the livingroom then has ethernet runs to the 3 different HD DVR's
    - maybe i should say, in the livingroom i have purchased the extra switch, but not actaully installed it
    - currently my ethernet run to the livingroom hooks into one of the three HD DVR's
    - i ran ethernet connections through a single switch (and not directly off the router) so as to prevent performance issues from impacting my wireless network and my computer directly hooked into the router / modem.

    ok, so now for the questions . . .
    1) will the HD DVR's be able to see each other through the various switches? my assumption is yes
    2) if i used an ethernet instead of a switch, would it complicate the HD DVR's ability to 'see' each other? my assumption is yes
    3) is there a performance difference between using a switch and a router? i assumed a router would be slower
    4) was i correct in assuming that not hooking directly into the modem / router would prevent the MVR traffic from slowing down my wireless network, computer connected directly to the router, etc?

    many thanks in advance.
     
  7. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Yes you will be able to. On my network each room has a switch in it that connects back to a central switch. So between my STB's there can be three switches between them and they see each other, no problems.

    Sorry, don't understand your question, a switch is used to connect ethernet connected devices together.

    Normally a consumer router that has multiple ports on it for connecting networked devices has a built in switch, the router part of the box only gets involved if the traffic needs to get routed out to another network. The answer to your question is it's a depends on how good the switch in your router performs, may be OK, may not.

    Goes back to how well your route/switch performs, if that's not a choke point then you should be OK on the wireless network since the switch would keep traffic off your wireless network, except for the broadcast packets that the receivers/DVR's put out.
     
  8. dhines

    dhines Godfather

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    meant to say router . . .

    btw, thanks for taking time to respond.
     
  9. Scott Kocourek

    Scott Kocourek Well-Known Member

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    So will one of those USB wireless b/g adapters work with this?
     
  10. LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    Possibly - 802.11g theoretically has enough bandwidth to stream at least one HD stream, but remember, ALL the wireless devices in your home share that bandwidth. Also, if you have any interference from other 2.4ghz signals (cordless phones or other nearby WLANs) or electronic interference from a microwave oven or a vacuum cleaner or whatnot), your signal will degrade. 802.11n tends to work much better, again depending on your home environment and how many devices are sharing the bandwidth.
     
  11. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    "But" does any USB adapter work with the H/HR2x?
     
  12. LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    Ah, missed the USB part of it. Nope, VOS is right.

    An 802.11g ETHERNET adapter might work, but not a USB-based one. :sure:
     
  13. 2dogz

    2dogz Godfather

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    Don't forget that without a connection to the router you give up the the dhcp server to manage ip address allocation. Manual configuration may be simple for you and I, but the vast unwashed masses will be scratching their heads trying to come up with a subnet mask. Suppose someone could come up with a paint by numbers crib sheet though.
     
  14. Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Ah, but you don't need DHCP .. Each STB will find a unique IP address on it's own and they will talk just fine. Literally NOTHING to configure, not even a DHCP server. Just plug and play.
     
  15. 2dogz

    2dogz Godfather

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    Interesting. First I heard of this. Will have to play with it when I get upgraded.
     
  16. Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    This is, of course, when only the STBs are on the network (DECA without router/DHCP connection). The STBs will choose a standard 169.254 address that PCs choose when no DHCP service is available.
     
  17. dbmaven

    dbmaven Icon

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    I'm a little disconcerted by the semi-announcement by DirecTV that at some point in the future they'll start charging for the privilege of using MRV. Software development is a one-time expense - once the core functionality is there, maintenance is minimal (unless bugs are discovered and/or the functionality is expanded upon - but that becomes new development work). Considering the incredible base of "free" alpha-testing that they get from places like DBSTalk - which reduces their testing expenses by orders of magnitude - I'm trying to understand the rationale for this new "fee".

    I like the functionality a lot, and it goes a long way towards making the promise of a "whole home media center" a reality - but charging for it on top of the rest of the monthly fees? Wow. Just. Wow.
     
  18. Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    DIRECTV obviously feels that people will pay for MRV and as a result has decided to charge for it. You will have to decide for yourself if you'd rather path the fee or live without MRV. I suspect there will be a lot of takers for each path.
     
  19. JeffBowser

    JeffBowser blah blah blah

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    Amazing to me how people think software development, maintenance, and support is such a trivial thing. That's my business folks, and it is not trivial, nor are its costs. Like or dislike DirecTV's pricing policies, software is not a trivial afterthought, before, during, or after development.
     
  20. pappy97

    pappy97 Icon

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    That's why you should do what I do: 802.11n on 5Ghz. No interference whatsoever.

    (As an aside, I get really ticked off that all 802.11n is NOT on 5 Ghz. Bought a blu-ray player with a built in n wireless adaptor, only to find out that it's on 2.4 Ghz so I had to connect it to a 802.11n 5 Ghz wireless bridge).
     
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