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Death of DVD Media

Discussion in 'The OT' started by 1953, Sep 1, 2012.

Will DVD Media Succumb to Streaming (muti-choice)

  1. All DVD (I do mean all, in all industries)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Home DVD entertainment only (Thing the gravity of such a change)

    7 vote(s)
    8.8%
  3. Partial

    5 vote(s)
    6.3%
  4. No

    29 vote(s)
    36.3%
  5. Yes

    34 vote(s)
    42.5%
  6. Would you prefer streaming to DVD's?

    6 vote(s)
    7.5%
  7. No Opinion

    2 vote(s)
    2.5%
  8. A major infrusture shift

    1 vote(s)
    1.3%
  9. Some percentage of the general public would not be receptive

    4 vote(s)
    5.0%
  10. Yes, for a niche market

    23 vote(s)
    28.8%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. 1953

    1953 Icon

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    +1
     
  2. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Comparing Blu-ray purchase to movie theater viewing doesn't require repeat viewing to be of value... If you are a family of 3 or 4, it probably costs at least as much to see in the theater vs owning the Blu-ray even if you never watch it again.

    That value comparison only goes up as the price of that Blu-ray goes down... so a $5 Blu-ray is even easier to purchase than a $20 one.

    Yes... and if you only ever want to watch it one time, that is better and cheaper. But if you wanted to watch it 2 or 3 times, the purchase becomes the better option. As I noted, one-time watch movies aren't good purchases unless they are absurdly cheap.

    Those movie channels cost money too... they are a better deal per movie IF a lot is on that month that you want to watch... but you also can't just watch any movie you want... only the ones on the air that month. So there are tradeoffs.

    There is a monthly cost for Netflix too... and they don't have every movie... and ones they do have might be rented to someone else... I found Netflix didn't have enough variety for me, frankly, to stay a regular member for an extended membership.
     
  3. 1953

    1953 Icon

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    Feb 7, 2006
    Desoto, TX
    Stewart, you made a very good point regarding the cost of optional movie channels. We do not subscribe to any due to their low value. By good and timely searches we generally find a good number of free, quality movies. Combining this tactic with prudent DTV pay per view rentals and prudent purchase of BD's that we will either view multiple times or pass on to our grown children's families has proven to a wise practice.
     
  4. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    The more I think about it, the more I see a cloud/STB/card combination system.

    Not addressing who would operate it, I see a system where you could buy direct from the production companies rather than distributors. You could buy (or rent) a version with no ads or promos at all, or, for a lower cost, you could buy a version with ads/promos before or after (but not during) the primary content. You could buy (or rent) individual episodes or movies, or an entire series of TV shows or movies (main plus all sequels).

    Once purchased, the content would go to a cloud. If you have the capabilities on your web connection, you could download the content to a STB or other hardware of some type. HTPCs could have an authentication dongle of some type.

    If you did not have a sufficient web connection, you could go to something like a Redbox type kiosk to download onto a media card or drive, which could be transferred to your STB/HTPC, etc.

    There would have to be some kind of non-transferrable authentication system, but there would have to be a way to get a card/chip/code replaced if lost, stolen or damaged. Content would be encrypted, but could be transferred to other devices as long as the card/chip/code was present for playback.

    As noted above, nothing would ever have to be returned on rentals, they would just die after the specified rental period.

    No monthly costs. Only the costs of hardware and the content.
     
  5. Blurayfan

    Blurayfan Hall Of Fame

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    The cloud based system is already being used by some studios. New releases now may include a UltraViolet copy in Blu-ray or DVD purchases. UV allows the viewer to watch or download to any device that supports the system. Some releases even give HD UV versions as well as HD digital copies.

    For example
    The Hunger Games BD included a 1080p digital copy from iTunes and a 1080p UV copy redeemed through Vudu.

    Jaws BD also provided both versions except the UV copy is handled by Universal themselves through a website Universalhidef.com
     
  6. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    ...and what does that dog actually "see" in that cone that we humans don't see?

    [​IMG]
     
  7. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    It's not what he sees but what he hears, "his master's voice". Was RCA's trademark for years.
     
  8. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Kittrell, NC
    The problem with clouds, that people should see but don't seem to...

    The cloud can go away tomorrow, and then what?

    The next cloud service that fails and disappears won't be the first one to do so... and people are left hanging.

    Your cloud of movies available to watch anytime you want is fine... as long as you can access that cloud... but if that company goes out of business or changes ownership... you might find you paid for stuff you no longer have access to..

    It's one reason why I prefer iTunes over Ultraviolet... iTunes could go away tomorrow, but I at least have a copy for the moment that I can burn to a DVD and theoretically not lose as long as my devices work.

    If they stop making Blu-rays tomorrow, your current Blu-rays still work... untrue if the cloud service you subscribe to goes away...

    People are funny... in NY where it is crowded and lots of people living in a smaller area, public transportation and walking and bicycling are common... but move to just a slightly less congested area, and people far prefer to own their own car/truck/whatever for transportation even IF they could get by on those other methods to move about town.

    Your car requires maintenance, but is there whenever you want it to be... whereas public transportation requires you to operate on their schedule, not your own... and bikes put you out in the elements on rainy days.

    I see the cloud and streaming more as supplements and additional offerings rather than outright replacements... Cloud/streaming is fine as an add-on... but not something I want to be my everything.
     
  9. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Kittrell, NC
    I think you missed the joke there... since the dog is looking into the cone, not turning his ear to it! :)

    So maybe they put dog food into it :)
     
  10. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    The cloud in my concept would only be temporary, like a shopping cart or a layaway service. Just a holding place until you download to some device. It would timeout at some point.
     
  12. 1953

    1953 Icon

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    Desoto, TX
    Your fluffy white cloud could turn dark gray, open up, drench you with rain, deafen you with thunder and strike you with lighting! :eek2:
     
  13. Mark Holtz

    Mark Holtz Day Sleeper DBSTalk Club

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    What initially attracted me to DVDs? Twice the resolution of VHS, plus the fact that the movies were being issued in their original aspect ratio.

    Now, the problem I have with streaming media is that it is dependent on a uncapped high-speed connection. Whats the highest-speed connection available to most consumers? Cable Internet run by the cable companies. That's partially why they are placing a cap on bandwidth. After all, if you can watch all your shows on Netflix for $20-$25 per month, why pay the cable company $100? Also, mobile plans are capped as well, limiting you to what you can watch while on the go.

    So, what's a good way to pass time nowadays while traveling? Read a book, read a e-book, or watch a movie on a laptop. Heck, if you know what you are doing, you can rip several movies to the hard drive and watch off the hard drive.

    There is also a question about availability. Princess Mononoke is no longer a Buena Vista (Disney) title, thus it is technically "out of print", and you have to search for a copy now. But, can you stream it? Not anymore.

    Now, there is the question about double-dipping. The big problem I have with BluRay is that I already own the title on DVD. There are very few titles that are worth paying full price upon re-release. Maybe when they hit the $5 bargain bin.
     
  14. Blurayfan

    Blurayfan Hall Of Fame

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    There is a site DVD2Blu that offers a selection of movies that you can exchange your DVD for a Blu-ray copy, priced at $4.95 to $6.95 last time I visited the site.
     
  15. speedy4022

    speedy4022 Legend

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    Blu and dvd will be around for awhile because of several things number one some people want a physical copy of the movie. The next thing is no one cab agree on one standard UV or itunes and I think disney has one just for their movies. The last one is there are still a few places where u can't a good enough connection to stream 1080p movies. I myself buy the movie if it has a UV or VUDU copy I watch it through them and only use the blu or dvd for bonus features.
     
  16. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    If we get rid of physical media, a third of the country won't have access to movies.

    The latest figures I could find say that 74% of the homes in the country have Internet access. Of those, 6% still are on dial-up connections. That means a third of the country doesn't have any way to download a movie.

    If you were a movie studio, would you choose to eliminate a third of your customer base?

    The third that can't download a movie can still go to Walmart and buy a $29 DVD player, in which they play movies they rent from a Redbox.
     
  17. Eddie501

    Eddie501 AllStar

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    There really are two different markets. Sell-through & rentals. I can see where streaming has already almost replaced the physical disc rental market for people who just want to rent a movie. The idea of driving to Blockbuster and staring at wall of boxes, hoping they have your movie in stock now seems ridiculous.

    But the movie collectors will never switch to streaming. We want packaging. We want bonus features. We want lossless audio and the best picture available. And most of all, we want our movies available to us without dependance upon some additional service. I can't quite fathom paying roughly the same price as a disc to 'own' a movie in the cloud, which would contain none of the above.
     
  18. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    That was addressed in what I laid out. Those who can't download directly to their homes could go to Redbox, WM, BB or wherever else to download to a transportable device.

    Oh, but they could. They could include even more 'extras'. Since the providers would be saving money on physical media, packaging and distribution/shipping, they could provide more extras. Not that they would, but they could.

    Collectible packaging would be the only thing missing and that could still be available by direct mail order or in limited stores. Those that REALLY wanted packaging could get it.
     
  19. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    As an archivist, I didn't like your idea.

    Plus you are assuming these folks have a STB or something similar. I think the folks who don't have the Internet probably have old TVs on an antenna. Finding anything more than a composite video and line level audio inputs might be pushing it. Finally, you're replacing a 5" silver disc with another physical thing and I'm not sure it would be cheaper.

    I'm not saying that the country isn't moving rapidly to primarily a download model. I just think it's way too early to get rid of DVDs, too.
     
  20. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    As an archivist, you should like it more since you would be able to store copies in multiple places, even write to a disc if you choose.

    Nothing would really be replaced as such. Any device that has a media port (USB, XD card, etc.) could be used.

    The issue to be worked out would be a form of authentication that would be acceptable to both the consumer and the providers.
     

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