Direct TV fixed wireless Broadband

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Bedford11, Aug 21, 2015.

  1. Gloria_Chavez

    Gloria_Chavez Godfather

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    Exceptional economics.....

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    Editor's Corner—The economics of fixed wireless, from LTE to 5G, and what it means for Verizon

    Editor's Corner—The economics of fixed wireless, from LTE to 5G, and what it means for Verizon | FierceWireless

    Closer to home, Rise Broadband offers an even clearer look at the economics of LTE-powered fixed wireless services. Specifically, the company’s co-founder and chief development officer, Jeff Kohler, said recently that fixed deployments typically cost a fifth to a tenth what it would cost to build a comparable wired service. Rise operates fixed wireless services in rural locations in Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah and elsewhere in the West. The company’s data allotments range from 250 GB per month to 500 GB per month.
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  2. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Well sure, obviously it costs much less in rural areas because running 10 miles of wire that goes by a couple dozen houses costs a lot more than adding an antenna to a cell tower that already exists.
     
  3. Gloria_Chavez

    Gloria_Chavez Godfather

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    True. But look at these numbers. Compare the 10 dollar a home number to the 2.5k that Google Fiber laid out in capx per subscriber. Compelling economics in urban areas (Boston cited blow). It won't be as reliable as fiber, but if you could conceivably pay 20% of current monthly broadband prices for 80% reliability, then you have a gamechanger

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    “The key to Starry’s technology, which uses beamforming to deliver symmetrical broadband speeds as high as 1 Gbps using millimeter wave spectrum over distances as far as 1.5 kilometers, is cost,” wrote the Wall Street analysts at MoffettNathanson in a detailed report on Starry issued in April. “With all-in costs for a base station of perhaps $25K, they have already driven their total cost to ‘pass’ a home to as low as $10 in a dense city like Boston. Their next target is lowering the costs of their CPE equipment, which is currently more than $1,000, to perhaps $200 per home.”

    Continued MoffettNathanson: “With costs that low, they could offer competitive broadband speeds for a fraction of the current price of wired broadband.”
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    Last edited: Jul 20, 2017
  4. chances14

    chances14 Member

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    reliability should be a top concern. the internet is useless if you can't count on it to work when you need it most.

    wireless will never be as reliable as wired. If i was living in an urban area and my provider started neglecting their wired cable or fiber connection in favor of wireless, I would be concerned
     
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  5. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    There's no need to run fiber to every house. There's a reason why Google gave up on it and Verizon has all but stopped adding new FIOS areas except where it is built in to new developments.

    DOCSIS 3 supports gigabit service, as does G.fast. DOCSIS 3 is a relatively cheap upgrade for an existing cable plant, and while G.fast is more involved it is a fraction of the cost of running fiber to every house.

    I don't see how anyone is going to be able to do fixed wireless to a dense urban area like Boston. They don't have enough spectrum. If they use the 30 or 60 GHz frequencies they're talking about for 5G they could, but then they will need WAY more base stations because those frequencies require line of sight to the homes being served.

    I don't see why wireless can't be as reliable as wired. It isn't like wired internet never goes out - especially if you have cable internet!
     
  6. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    Here is a good analogy of how Fixed Wireless will be used in the core areas of large cities. AT&T has competitors breathing down their necks, this could get interesting, there is a very high probability that some of the current big names in the industry will not be around 10 years from now.

    I used microwave (fixed wireless) 17 years ago, it was just as reliable as wired.

    Jump Fiber Bringing High-Speed Internet to Downtown SA
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2017
  7. evotz

    evotz Active Member

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    I don't see fixed wireless as a solution in urban areas either. Not enough spectrum.

    The problem is AT&T and all the big telcos they want to focus on the large urban areas. They will bend over backwards to be the first to bring 100gbps speeds to an urban area. Meanwhile their rural counterparts rot in 26.4kbps dialup speeds.

    Fixed wireless (4G frequencies) would work great for sparsely populated rural areas. And while AT&T has released press releases stating their intentions in this area, I'm not really seeing a lot of physical movement with this.

    5G at the millimeter wavelength is not going to be an answer for this. The signal just does not go far enough. You would have to build towers 200 feet apart and run fiber to each of those towers for backhaul. That won't work in urban areas and it won't work in rural areas.

    AT&T and the big telcos need to address this need for their rural areas or sell off those rural areas to smaller regional telcos that might actually care. And like wise, people living in rural areas, they have to understand that they are never going to reap the full benefits of broadband in an urban area. People living in rural areas will likely never be able to cut the cord and rely solely on streaming services, its part of the cost you pay in living in the rural areas.
     
  8. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    He who controls the utility poles is king.

    The new small cells are being placed on utility poles and other installed infrastructure, no towers needed

    Battle Begins for Small Cells, Smart Cities | Light Reading

    Why Utility Poles Are So Important to the Future of the Internet

    Google Fiber gains support from Level 3 in utility pole attachment battle in Nashville | FierceTelecom

    Google Fiber battles AT&T, Comcast for utility pole access in Silicon Valley | FierceTelecom

    5G can go thru rain/foliage at short distances, 1 small cell on a utility pole can reach approx 40 homes reliably in the compact city/suburban environment. With just 1 fiber hookup.

    Khan says even without a clear line of sight, and surrounded by lots of foilage, their base station has delivered hundreds of megabits per second to devices 300 to 400 meters away

    C Spire and Phazr Complete 5G Trial With Millimeter Waves in Mississippi

    Lightower is no longer.
    Due to Lightower’s network in the largest northeastern metro markets, it will make Crown Castle the company to beat for small cell deployments in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia.

    Industry Voices—Entner: From Dish/Amazon to Crown Castle/Lightower, it's merger mayhem | FierceWireless
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2017
  9. evotz

    evotz Active Member

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    So, how many small cell utility poles are you going to need to provide access to say a 90 square mile city? Or a 200 square mile city?

    At what point does it become unfeasible to run fiber to X number of small cell utility poles and becomes more feasible to just run fiber to the premises in those situations? Why limit yourself to spectrum assets if you're going to be running fiber all over the city to backhaul those small cells?

    And in rural areas, who is going to run fiber to a utility pole so that 5 households can get access to the spectrum it will provide? Big telcos have already proven that they aren't going to run fiber into sparsely populated rural areas (which, I'm not saying is the wrong decision). What makes you think they'd do it for 5G small cell antennas on utility poles in rural areas?

    I just have a hard time getting excited about 5G on millimeter wavelengths. If they want to run 5G in larger cities like a wider public wifi, I might see that as a possible application. But as a replacement for any type of home broadband connection? I just don't see it.
     
  10. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    Click to EXPAND
     
  11. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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  12. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    Tennessee gets AT&T Fixed Wireless, AT&T is really lighting a fire with their Fixed wireless rollout.

    AT&T offers Fixed Wireless Internet to McMinn & Meigs

    2 million wireless hookups coming from Microsoft

    Another bid to close the rural digital divide -- GCN

    A new $3 dollar TV bundle coming, you can bet somebody is going to do it.

    Discovery Interest in Scripps Driven by Visions of $3 TV Bundle

    Lookout AT&T, 15 buck TV package being introduced here.

    OTT Wars Just Got More Interesting, Xfinity Instant TV Now on Deck - Telecompetitor

    Are these subs switching to Internet TV?
    The company said nearly half of DirecTV Now customers are coming from competitor pay-TV providers, rather than cannibalizing AT&T’s base.
    Where is the other half coming from?

    DirecTV is proving good for AT&T’s wireless business, bad for TV

    Interesting numbers

    Online TV Is Growing Too Slowly to Stop the Bleeding in Cable

    Some important market developments over the past year could also potentially move the needle on FWA viability. First, more spectrum is becoming available, with new bands, carrier aggregation techniques and new capacity becoming available from LAA, CBRS and so on. In the mmWave bands, the wide 200 MHz to 1 GHz channel swaths support, at least in theory, game-changing speed and capacity improvements. There is a gap in mid-band spectrum options—something the FCC is looking at—which could open up new opportunities for FWA in ex-urban type areas.

    Industry Voices—Lowenstein’s View: The next year is critical for fixed wireless access | FierceWireless
     
  13. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    That $3 TV bundle is just for Discovery's (and presumably Scripps) channels. If things go the way CBS and Discovery are moving, there will be a lot of $3-$7 packages for a groups of channels, and you can be sure networks will buy channels from each other to try to insure each package has something the typical person wants so you'll have to buy a dozen of them, plus each of the four networks, and you'll be paying as much as today but billing will be a lot more of a pain and exclusives will probably mean a single streaming box doesn't even work for all of them!
     
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  14. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    I do not think the 100 dollar plus cable bill will be the norm in the future. I am thinking 35 dollars and south will be the norm. With the real, targeted advertising model, no truck rolls, no customer equipment, etc.. People are discovering they do not watch all the junk channels in the monster size cable package. Say, four, 3 dollar packages with 12-15 of your favorite channels, plus all the thousands of free stuff out there, could very well be the norm. Sure, there will be the TV nuts and the wealthy that will subscribe to the old mega everything pack but it will not be the norm. Going to be interesting, we shall see.
    Really don't know who will be paying the bills, automation is hitting every sector.
    The Hidden (Human) Cost of Automation | Light Reading

    Grocery-Stocking Robots Will Soon Take over St. Louis Area Supermarkets - Breitbart
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  15. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Just the four locals cost me over $9/month on my cable bill (Mediacom breaks them out separately and passes through 100% of what they're paying) so good luck if you think you'll be able to get $3 packages with anything but crap channels filled with stuff like Storage Wars and Gold Rush.
     
  16. Gloria_Chavez

    Gloria_Chavez Godfather

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    Frankly, if you live in a metropolitan area, the OTA HD signal is better than the corresponding PayTv one for all major networks.

    And unless you are a sports fan, you can do without PayTv.

    But if you are a sports fan, expect to continue to weather annual price hikes of 6% or more, per year. ESPN recently announced that as their current carriage agreements lapse, it will be seeking a 6% annual hike per sub, up from today's 5%.

    Meanwhile, the TIPS Treasury Market indicator is forecasting an annual inflation rate of 1.8% over the next decade
     
  17. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    That may be true in a very few metropolitan areas, but often the reverse is true.

    You can. I could, but choose to not do without.
     
  18. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Monterey...
    Everything is not "going Android", nor are antenna manufacturers riding a boom of any magnitude.
     
  19. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    Perfect scenario for AT&T's fixed wireless and DirectTV Now skinny (cheap)pack.

    Pay TV loses ground to antenna-only households

    But wait, there's more, when the new standard hits there will be more defections to OTA.

    The other major feature - called conditional access - will let viewers have access to over-the-top subscriptions such as Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Video through over-the-air 6MHz transmissions rather than having to use their data plans, resulting in a dramatic increase in the capacity to deliver mobile video content over the new few years.

    ATSC 3.0 will change watching TV on mobiles
     

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