DirecTV 4K UHD plans

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by SomeRandomIdiot, Jun 15, 2014.

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  1. SomeRandomIdiot

    SomeRandomIdiot Godfather

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    In a nutshell, it is what every new format goes through.

    The problem is EVERYONE is using or inferring the term HDR, when unlike Blu-Ray and HD-DVD, no one used one technology as a term (Xerox) for both of them, as is being done with HDR.

    I original used the HD-DVD/Blu-Ray as the example in line 5, but the better is example is 3D, where Mitsubishi/Samsung 3D glasses would not work with Panasonic etc.
     
  2. GregLee

    GregLee Hall Of Fame

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    It's not all about the nits. A year or so ago, Dolby was saying that the limited brightness of current displays was not really a problem, and that Dolby Vision could do a good job on current devices. I think the bit depth of current display panels is a bigger difficulty. The current TVs that have some claim to be HDR capable have 10 bit panels, but Dolby has said they want at least 12 bit color depth.

    I don't think we know that Samsung has foreclosed Dolby Vision for their current sets. Perhaps they've just chosen the SMPTE HDR system as an expedient to be first to market with TVs that can display some sort of HDR source. They might be able to do Dolby Vision on their current sets, with a system software update, or at worst a new $500 or so One Connect Box.
     
  3. SomeRandomIdiot

    SomeRandomIdiot Godfather

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    V-Nova PERSEUS was award a NewBay Publishing / TV Technology's 2015 NAB Best of Show Award.

    If you think it is an April Fool's joke, the joke is on you.
     
  4. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Interesting...that would seem to indicate that it IS working outside of the standard raster processing that has been the basis of all video compression for decades. There were a bunch of proposals early in the MPEG-4 design about using differential and/or vector analysis to achieve better quality over comparable bandwidth, but they were rejected because of the radically greater decoding load (although "sprites" did make it into the spec, they were not really useful for general video use). Processing power has gotten a lot cheaper since then, obviously.

    Maybe these guys should change their name to "Pied Piper." :) (Kudos to those who get THAT reference!)
     
  5. GregLee

    GregLee Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, I watched several hours of the Masters on DirecTV, using my new Samsung JS9000. It looked great. Samsung has made strides in their upconversion to 4K -- the resolution looked to me like first rate 1080p, quite a bit better than I ever saw on DirecTV with my old 2013 plasma TV. Good brightness, too, of course, but also very good color. The next generation of TVs will have better resolution (4K), better brightness (HDR), and better colors (WCG+HDR). Probably better motion display, too.
     
  6. SomeRandomIdiot

    SomeRandomIdiot Godfather

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    Actually, it is about the NITS to get the contrast ratio.

    NITS-35.JPG
     
  7. SomeRandomIdiot

    SomeRandomIdiot Godfather

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    1 person likes this.
  8. SomeRandomIdiot

    SomeRandomIdiot Godfather

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  9. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    That's why everyone purchasing an UHD set should wait until every company gets their specs under the UHD Alliance umbrella.
     
  10. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Every company? That might be forever.....
     
  11. SomeRandomIdiot

    SomeRandomIdiot Godfather

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    On the very first page I noted that the UHD in Best Buy was obviously better than anything else being shown from 1/2 a showroom away.

    The first 30 pages of this thread are people telling me it was my imagination (even though I did not know it was a UHD set from 1/2 a store away).

    Then for the next 40 pages, people who actually decided to look instead of read found that UHD does improve things and look better from a long distance away - despite what is said for how close one would need to be to see 4K.

    I am not aware of any point in time in the past 20 years when specs are not constantly changing.

    If you wait long enough, you can buy a 8k unit in 2020.

    But then specs will be changing on those as well.......
     
  12. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    What is the purpose of this post? That you're right and every other Yahoo was wrong?
     
  13. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    Can you post the post number ? I can not find that on page 1 or 2.

    My pen pal bought a Vizio P model 50" and says it is awesome and she is on Dish for her service. She said it looked much better than the Vizio HD next to it. Of course we all know that whoever adjusted the sets possibly has a lot to do with how they look in the stores.
     
  14. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    There is a difference between UHD TVs making regular HD look good and regular HD looking good simply because it is up-scaled to UHD resolution. There are the same number of pixels in the source data, with the same color depth and same compression artifacts. Using 4 physical pixels to display one logical pixel doesn't automatically make the PQ better.

    We don't know how much the rest of the components add to the PQ. One can be pretty sure that manufacturers are not under the kind of margin pressure with UHD sets that they are under with HD sets. IOW, do UHD sets look better than the best HD sets displaying the same content or do they just stand out in comparison to the surrounding HD sets that cost a quarter as much? Would a set that has a 1080 panel attached to an otherwise identical set of electronics really look noticeably inferior to the UHD panel?
     
  15. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    That it looks better form 2 blocks away, it is YOUR opinion, and does not makes a scientific fact. So from your post we can take YOU saw a TV with a nice picture from a great distance away. This does not proves or disproves anything.
     
  16. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    How is higher resolution going to make a difference when you are so far away that even with 20/5 vision you can't see the resolution difference? It could be an expanded color palette, but there were no HDR sets available when the claim was made - and HDR content is still quite rare today.

    Studies have consistently shown people rate a brighter picture as better. The reason that 4K TV stood out was probably a brighter picture. Probably coupled with the TV being quite high end and having more LEDs for better local field dimming and therefore a higher contrast ratio. Neither are a property of 4K, but either would make the picture stand out from half a showroom away.
     
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  17. GregLee

    GregLee Hall Of Fame

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    But It does. 4 pixels show 4 times as many brightness levels for each of the three RGB primaries.
     
  18. GregLee

    GregLee Hall Of Fame

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    There isn't any directly relevant science on either side of the question, so far as I know. I have enough interest in the issue that whenever I see people arguing on line about this, I read the discussion. The closest thing I've seen to an experiment testing whether people can distinguish 2k from 4k at ordinary viewing distances was at one of those "shootouts" in an electronics store; the setup was comparatively informal, and the people who did distinguish correctly outnumbered those who didn't. On the other side of the question, there is zero evidence that people cannot distinguish. All we have are some bogus arguments based on seeing individual pixels, and then other people repeating what they heard, and making charts and calculators. No relevant experiments.

    There have been some results that might bear indirectly on the question, involving hyper-acuity, so-called, where people apparently have some ability to distinguish details smaller than the spacing of their retinal cells would seem to allow for. There are relevant articles in Wikipedia.
     
  19. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Well, why join an alliance if you're going to do your own thing?
     
  20. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    Exactly, and as such ONE's OWN opinion should NOT be posted as FACTS. Saying "On the very first page I noted that the UHD in Best Buy was obviously better than anything else being shown from 1/2 a showroom away", does NOT qualifies as a fact, just an opinion!
     

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