DirecTV ending contracts with residential dealers

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by energyx, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    Except that the sports bar wouldn't be using a bunch of Rokus, they'd be using a networked streaming box provided directly from AT&T, probably designed just for commercial use with their forthcoming streaming "full DirecTV" service. It should be easy enough to stream 20 different channels simultaneously if the bar has gigabit service from AT&T Fiber. For other gigabit providers, well, they'd probably just want to go with that MSO's own TV service (at least if the MSO enforces data caps against competing video providers).

    I say all that to underscore that, several years from now,DTV's base of commercial DBS subscribers will probably also dwindle, although not to the extent that their residential base will. Whether the nationwide customer pool will be enough to sustain profitable operations until DTV's current fleet of satellites fails, or whether AT&T at some point sells off their DBS operations after converting the lion's share to OTT, who knows. But those scenarios are certainly years away.
     
  2. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    If they wanted to do that, they'd have it built into the Genie 2 and authorized by the access card. If there's no login, there's no way to share the account.
     
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  3. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    And it works.

    Rich
     
  4. JoeTheDragon

    JoeTheDragon Hall Of Fame

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    and will that AT&T Fiber be free? or at the same rate they pay now for tv?

    What bar will pay $5-10K for an fiber build out or $1K/mo for an 100/100 DIA fiber line (just for internet) and will ATT give an a bar UNCAPED / UNthrottled LTE?? for the same rate as sat tv with TV? How fast will a bar hit 22GB/mo and be slowed down to useless speeds? half way though 1 day of NFL Ticket?

    Maybe cable can give them 1G/1G DIA fiber for say $2500 /mo
     
  5. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    I just contacted a large DirecTV dealer who has every class of dealership except MDU, and they did not receive a notice of dealership termination.

    I also just went to Solid Signal's site and see that they have DirecTV receivers for sale for the "full boat" prices, but I found nothing that referred to establishing a new customer account. When I clicked Add-to-cart for the H-25, it purported to charge me $99, "saving" me $100.99, and when I went from there to PayPal, it did not forewarn me of an activation commitment to allow me that price. So they don't seem to be booking that sale as a dealer would.
     
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  6. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    You seem to be confusing AT&T Fiber (which is a wired broadband service for homes and businesses) with AT&T Wireless (LTE). And no one pays thousands of dollars for an AT&T Fiber build-out. AT&T just runs the fiber wherever they choose to, like when they ran it down my street a couple months ago. Within AT&T's existing wired service footprint (the South, Midwest, CA), they're pretty aggressively expanding their fiber-to-the-premises network in urban and certain suburban areas by converting streets where they had previously only been offering fiber-to-the-node (i.e. Uverse) or DSL service. At least for residential accounts (no idea about commercial customers), there's no data cap with AT&T Fiber if you have 1 Gbps service.

    Granted, AT&T is never going to offer fiber service everywhere, even within their footprint. But very fast broadband internet from various providers is just going to keep penetrating more and more of the map in the years to come. And when I wrote about the possibility that an increasing number of commercial establishments might switch from DBS to various forms of IP-based video, I was thinking about the 2020s, not right now.

    Ultimately, all video is going to be subsumed within the internet. Sports bars and other commercial establishments won't be immune from that trend. It's just a question of how many years.
     
  7. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Just playing with the numbers here, I currently have 100 Mbps fiber at my place, which wouldn't be fast enough. I could upgrade to 500 Mbps for another $150/month. However, even if my fiber had 100% uptime to the ISP, going out over the internet is never 100% reliable. You experience brief route outages that may last seconds, minutes or occasionally hours where one location simply can't "see" another location. If that happened during a big game, I'd have a lot of very angry customers.

    Now they aren't happy when the TVs all go "searching for signal" when it rains hard, but they all understand why it happens, and know that will only last a few minutes. If they go "searching for server" because of a problem reaching Directv's streaming servers, how long will it be out? Just a minute? Or long enough that they should leave and go somewhere with satellite? They won't know, but after a few minutes I could easily see them getting up to leave, which doesn't happen with rain fade (because they know it will be brief and because they don't want to get soaked leaving during a downpour :))

    I see zero advantage to switching from satellite to IP, even if Directv provided all the equipment for free and paid the $150/month difference to upgrade my fiber (which isn't AT&T, they don't operate in Iowa) It wouldn't make my service better, it wouldn't make it more reliable, so why would I switch? It wouldn't be cheaper for Directv to deliver to me, so why would they want me to switch? Even in a new install, when a business pays anywhere from thousands to tens of thousands a year to Directv, the cost of putting up a dish is not a factor like it can be for residential.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2018
  8. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    They’re still pushing it at Costco.
     
  9. Bigg

    Bigg Godfather

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    Business fiber is $$$. A lot of these sports bar places have VDSL or cable internet for credit card processing and back office type of stuff, but they just don't have the bandwidth to stream TV, much less at that kind of scale. They are not paying thousands per month for fiber. It might be more doable for a hotel, but then again, if they have to go from 100mbps to 500mbps or whatever, that's going to cost them a fortune versus having a dish hanging out on the roof. There is an efficiency to have DBS in being a pure broadcast mechanism that you don't get with IP. With individual households, it can be quite economical to have individual streaming boxes, not so with businesses.

    DirecTV's DBS system will be around for a long time, and the commercial side is going to be thriving for quite some time. As long as linear pay tv is around, satellite will be around with it. When linear tv is no longer linear tv, then satellite will die with it, but that could be a very, very long time. The idea of linear tv, at least for certain types of content, like sports and news, is very engrained in the American culture. Even if many homes start receiving content through apps as individual events that are streamed, I think commercial will still be receiving them as linear channels.
     
  10. Bigg

    Bigg Godfather

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    And many businesses don't have access to small business or consumer grade connectivity at those prices. They're looking at VDSL or cable versus Metro-E. If they can get away with a 12mbps DSL connection for credit card processing and office systems, and have DirecTV, then that's what they will do. Commercial is a lot more profitable, since commercial customers are willing and able to pay a lot more for the service, and it makes good business sense for them to do so, especially in a world of cord cutting, where many people cut the cord and then treat themselves to going out to the bar and getting wings to catch a few big games here and there.
     
  11. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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  12. Bigg

    Bigg Godfather

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  13. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Well what's funny about that is the Fiercevideo article doesn't quote AT&T's CEO saying anything about ending satellite service. That's all in the imagination of the author of that piece.

    If they were going to end satellite service anytime soon, they wouldn't be in the process of launching a new satellite. That would be a giant waste of money if they were going to end satellite service within the next 10 years.
     
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  14. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    I think both of your imaginations' are a bit constrained by current conditions when it comes to thinking about what things may be like a decade from now. For instance, talking about the unreliability of internet-based video delivery when that is only ever going to improve as time goes by thanks to continuing advances in technology. Meanwhile, rain fade (which is a real issue with DBS) is never going to get better. Sports bars would love not to have to deal with that problem any more. Likewise, trying to determine future business decisions based on the current costs of broadband for businesses. Also, isn't one of the reasons that lots of these businesses use DirecTV (rather than cable) because of sports packages that DTV exclusively offers? That could easily change too.

    All sorts of little changes in technology, business and regulations will unfold in the years to come. I'm not saying they will wipe out the use of DBS among sports bars and other business establishments, I'm just saying that they could, or at least significantly decrease its use.
     
  15. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    Here's an article about statements from AT&T's leaders back in Feb. of this year. Excerpt:

    Also on this week’s call, however, AT&T Senior Executive Vice President and CFO John Stephens noted that the company will continue to rely on satellite video delivery for rural areas for the foreseeable future. He did not detail the reasons behind this, but the likely explanation is that some rural areas are less likely to have quality broadband at high enough speeds to support video streams, particularly multiple video streams, while also supporting email, social media, telecommuting and other applications.​

    I don't think AT&T has made any statements about "ending" satellite service but they have definitely made statements that indicate that it will be deprecated, that AT&T's marketing energies will be in expanding OTT delivery to all those customers where that's a feasible option, with DBS being the back-up plan for customers that can't be served via OTT.

    And, of course, there was the Bloomberg article way back in 2016 that said that AT&T was aiming to make streaming their "primary" video platform by 2020.
     
  16. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Technology can advance all it wants, the internet won't be 100% reliable for delivery of packets in real time for the foreseeable future. Anyone who has a public route on the internet (a router with an AS designation) can alter the route for anything in the world, there's no security on that. Recently Google's entire cloud was unavailable for a couple hours because of a typo by someone at an ISP in Africa that misdirected Google's traffic through China & Russia (yeah, I'm suspicious that this was really an "accident" by an African ISP too...but what they said happened really can happen even if it was done by someone else in this particular case)

    There are constant denial of service attacks which will take down parts of the internet, if you are streaming Directv through a CDN that is attacked because it also serves something else being attacked (for whatever reason) it could take down your stream.

    I'm not saying the internet won't improve, but the situation TODAY is that you'll have more outage hours per year streaming that you will with satellite rain fade, and you won't have any idea when they come. Like you say, rain fade won't improve while streaming will but the situation that matters is the situation today. The situation 10 years from now is irrelevant, because that's getting to be around the time when Directv might have a satellite or two getting old - I have said many times I expect they will probably discontinue satellite in the early 2030s because they aren't going to replace any more satellites after T16 is launched early next year.
     
  17. KyL416

    KyL416 Hall Of Fame

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    Or if your ISP is having a pissing contest with one of the backbone providers like Verizon did with Cogent a few years ago and refused to expand their capacity to them unless Netflix agreed to pay up:
    Level3 Proves That Verizon Is Absolutely To Blame For Netflix Congestion... Using Verizon's Own Blog Post
    Study: Comcast and Verizon connections to Cogent dropped below 0.5Mbps
    During Netflix money fight, Cogent’s other big customers suffered too
    Verizon and Cogent settle differences, agree to boost Internet quality
     
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  18. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Did the CFO say anything about AT&T ending contracts with any residential dealers?
     
  19. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    Eh, nothing in this world will ever be 100% reliable/perfect. What I do know is that, for myself, DTV Now (at least for live TV) was more reliable in early 2018, whether delivered over broadband from Comcast or AT&T, than was DTV satellite when I had it a few years ago, which went out on at least some channels every damn time it rained.
     
  20. dreadlk

    dreadlk Hall Of Fame

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    I remember similar discussions about the viability of Directv and it’s use of Ku band vs C-Band. People said it would never work, the rain fade alone would kill it and the SD picture on DTV use to suck back then.

    Now I am a believer that the market will dictate which way the money goes and the corporations will follow that trail.

    Streaming seems to be the way people want content. Forget reliability or any other factor.

    It’s truly going to be a sad day but I fear it will come, so I will just enjoy my dish as long as it lasts. At least we got several years before the pain starts.
     

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