DIRECTV Nomad

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Scott Kocourek, Oct 6, 2010.

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  1. Oct 5, 2011 #1961 of 2007
    YakeVlad

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    I think the real failure that's being expressed here by some people is in the method D* is employing to deliver what is essentially a service. There are plenty of services currently available which enable us to quickly (a fraction of real-time) download TV show episodes and movies to mobile devices, tablets, and laptops on demand. They don't require us to go through a time consuming, multi-step, process that also involves pre-planing. With nomad D* is requiring each sub to schedule a tv show or movie for recording on a DVR, transfer it to a nomad box, wait for the nomad box to transcode the content, and then manually transfer it to the end device. So that's 4 steps compared to 1 and those 4 steps take significantly longer to complete than the 1-step alternative? It's starting to sound like a Rube Goldberg solution to me.

    IMHO what D* is trying to provide its subs is of great value, but it's solution is all wrong. A proper solution would have involved D* hosting the already transcoded content on servers which would be accessible to subs via an app and/or website. Subs would logon with their directv.com account (logon info can be saved for future visits), which would provide D* with authentication and all the info they need on what content a sub can access. Then the sub selects the content they want downloaded to their device, or tags a tv series for auto download when available, and the selected files are loaded to their device. If you want to take it a step further they could also offer up that content to be available for streaming, thus just a wait for the device to buffer. It merely provides another method of time-shifting (same thing DVRs provide us) for content to which we're already paying. This is a service just like MRV, only it's going to a mobile device not a set-top box. So treat it like a service, do the work for the customer and charge them for it. Now that I think about it, it's a bit appalling that D* is suggesting we have to pay $150 to purchase a device that still requires each of us to do all of the work.
     
  2. Oct 5, 2011 #1962 of 2007
    Jeremy W

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    When you're dealing with a digital AV signal delivered in realtime, it's not exactly a stretch to refer to it as "playing." The only difference is that it's being sent over the network instead of to the video decoder.
     
  3. Oct 5, 2011 #1963 of 2007
    Jeremy W

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    From a contractual standpoint, this isn't a solution at all. There is no way DirecTV could legally do this without agreements in place with all of the content providers. And they'd have a hell of a time getting that done.
    You don't have to pay anything. If you don't want to do the work, don't buy it.
     
  4. Oct 5, 2011 #1964 of 2007
    YakeVlad

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    They're already storing content for the on demand channels to which they had to sign agreements with the providers. How is this different?

    You do if you want to be able to copy recordings to mobile devices, which is my point. For the "right" to be able to copy those recordings you have to pay D* $150 for a nomad box (tool) and then you still have to do all of the work yourself (service). That's like paying a mechanic $150 to use his wrench, but then you still have to do the repair.
     
  5. Oct 5, 2011 #1965 of 2007
    dualsub2006

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    On Demand content is limited to select titles that the content provider selects and what D* can allow you to do with it is restricted by the provider.

    It's very different.
     
  6. Oct 5, 2011 #1966 of 2007
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    You hook it up and plug it in just like any other piece of gear in you setup and then install the software. That doesn’t sound like a whole lotta work to me. It certainly isn’t hard to select what you want and download it. I think maybe appalling is a bit harsh in this case.

    Unless I’m missing something it should take about fifteen minutes to setup up and it’s done. :shrug:

    Mike
     
  7. Oct 5, 2011 #1967 of 2007
    YakeVlad

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    It's not the installation to which I'm referring, it's the process required to get the content to the mobile device.
     
  8. Oct 5, 2011 #1968 of 2007
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    You select something to download and it does it. The first time you will have to wait for the transcode but after that you select new stuff to download. By the time you're done with what you already downloaded the new stuff will be ready.

    Maybe I’m missing something. What is it you expect to happen or what is it you think DIRECTV should be doing different that would make the selecting/downloading process easier?

    Mike
     
  9. Oct 5, 2011 #1969 of 2007
    YakeVlad

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    Yeah, I should have been more specific in my response. I was responding to Jeremy's comment on how it wouldn't be possible from a contractual standpoint for D* to work out an agreement for content to be stored on servers by them.

    I was attempting to counterpoint his argument with an example of an existing circumstance in which D* has come to an agreement with the content providers on storing content on servers.
     
  10. Oct 5, 2011 #1970 of 2007
    Jeremy W

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    The providers have complete control over what's available and when. That content is also not allowed to go to Nomad.
    No, it's more like buying a $150 wrench and still having to do the repair. Which is what happens when you buy a wrench.
     
  11. Oct 5, 2011 #1971 of 2007
    Jeremy W

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    I never said that.
     
  12. Oct 5, 2011 #1972 of 2007
    harsh

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    MoCA 2.0 doesn't apply to DECA.
     
  13. Oct 5, 2011 #1973 of 2007
    harsh

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    TV Everywhere is one of DIRECTV's stated goals.
     
  14. Oct 5, 2011 #1974 of 2007
    YakeVlad

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    There are a couple of practicality issues I see with the nomad process.

    1. Complexity of the solution compared to other existing models:
      It takes multiple steps to move from point A to point B. You have to record it on your DVR, then transfer it to the nomad, then the nomad has to transcode it, then it has to be transfered from the nomad to the end device. Compare that to iTunes or any number of other services out there in which the content goes from point A to point B in a single, much faster step. Why in the world does D*'s solution have to be so much more complicated?
    2. Time required to complete the process
      Nomad method: record it on your DVR (real-time), then transfer it to the nomad (real-time again), then the nomad has to transcode it (more time), then it has to be transfered from the nomad to the end device. So it takes somewhere on the order of 3 times the amount of time to copy the content as it does to watch the content and you haven't even seen anything yet.
      Competitors method: login, download the commercial-free content to device (a small fraction of real-time). At worst under this method it takes as long to copy the content and watch it as it would have to watch it live.
     
  15. Oct 5, 2011 #1975 of 2007
    HoTat2

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    Perhaps I missed something, but in the "competitors" method you describe, how does DIRECTV determine which shows you want transcoded and available for download?

    Nomad will allow you to select only shows you want to transcode outside of recorded PPV content from linear or VOD service.
     
  16. Oct 5, 2011 #1976 of 2007
    Jeremy W

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    You're picking from their library, kind of like VOD.
     
  17. Oct 5, 2011 #1977 of 2007
    Jeremy W

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    Yes, and the way they've been accomplishing it so far is by having the providers host their own content for streaming. Which is a very different concept.
     
  18. Oct 5, 2011 #1978 of 2007
    inkahauts

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    Each box can have three streams going through it's network port right now. That's only ten boxes. Now, kick that to ota for two of the three streams. I never said it was likely to happen, but it's possible. It's also possible they don't want to take the chance of overloading the smallest point which is the connection at the dvr and the hard drive. I think the real key is at what point do you cut off the bandwidth, and it's probably easier for them to say one real tome stream, vs trying to figure out how much traffic is going and coming, and what else the hard drive and dvr is doing, especially if the hard drive is already recording multiple streams as well, and throttle the transfer speed to make sure none of the many variables are being adversely effected. I am simply saying, I think they took everything into account when they made the decision, and I can see plenty of technical reasons where they might have been afraid of hitting a limit.

    And also, if they let the unit go full bore, and run at 100mbs, then how how many streams would that have left room for? There's just a lot of possibilities.
     
  19. Oct 5, 2011 #1979 of 2007
    Beerstalker

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    I'm still not convinced this is going to be nearly as complicated as some of you are making it out to be. My guess is you are going to be able to browse though your playlist on your DVR and select a recording. When you are looking at a recording there will be a new option for sending it to Nomad (like there are options for resume, play from beginning, etc).

    Once you select send to Nomad that will take care of the transfer and transcoding steps. Sure you might have to set up something telling the Nomad what resolution, screen shape, etc. but hopefully those will be one time set up items and you won't have to do it every time.

    I have to believe that this step will be pretty simple, and painless from a users point of view.

    Once it is done transcoding in the Nomad you will have to get it on your device somehow. This is where I'm not sure what it will entail. Will the recordings need to go through iTunes? Will the new DirecTV Nomad app be able to transfer them to your device over your homes wireless network?

    I'm eagerly awaiting the devices release. It could make things much simpler for me during my hunting trips this November. Rather than having to pack up a blu-ray player, and lug around a bunch of discs, I might be able to just load up my iPhone or iPad with a bunch of recordings/movies and take them with me. I've got the cables to hook up my iPhone/iPad to a TV alread so I wouldn't need anything. Sure I might lose some picture quality, but when you're staying in a trailer with no running water, bunking 8 guys in one room etc. picture quality isn't exactly the highest priority item.
     
  20. Oct 5, 2011 #1980 of 2007
    inkahauts

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    It's physically not even possible for content providers to allow Directv to do this, they don't even own rights of all their shows to do that. And that's the catch. Everything would have to be time limited in that plan, and that's not as good as getting it from your dvr where you can have stuff stored for years.

    Also, do you realize how much of an infrastructure that would take? Have every show on every channel, some for weeks, some for years depending on the shows and channels, and convert it to multiple qualities, and have it all accessible to everyone all the time? That's far far more than even hulu and most other video stores have. You are talking amazon and apple sized needs, and that's not directvs core business and they have no business getting involved in it unless they buy another company that already does it and integrate the two.

    As to your point about all the work, I think mostly you are complaining about the amount of time. If it works like I think it will, you will load software onto your device that will allow you to pick a show on a. Dvr to be put on your device, and that's it. I guess we will see, but I don't see them making you do each step individually. And even if they did, it shouldn't take a min to tell it each individual step. And for the time it takes, I know many computers wouldn't be able to accomplish ripping a blurry disc and then converting it to an optimized format and then moving it to a mobile device any faster, if at all. Yes, there are some that can, but I doubt most people's CPUs will do that, if they even have a blurry player in their machine, but if I can queue it up before I crash at night,and have it all set to go in the morning, I don't think that's really an issue. This is separate from streaming, and should be looked at that way. This is to take content with you for use without Internet. That takes a little planning usually.
     
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