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DIRECTV now broadcasting 1080p HD

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Doug Brott, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. Oct 13, 2009 #61 of 252
    gfrang

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    My tv is a 60 hz when it receives a 1080p/24 signal it switches to 48 hz .
     
  2. Oct 13, 2009 #62 of 252
    Huskie_2009

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    Thanks. I knew that but failed to add which video sources I wanted at 60 fps. You summed it up nicely.
     
  3. Oct 13, 2009 #63 of 252
    dorfd1

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    how do I enable 1080P on an H20-100?
     
  4. Oct 13, 2009 #64 of 252
    kfcrosby

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  5. Oct 13, 2009 #65 of 252
    jfalkingham

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    It would be nice if they could offer all of their primetime programming in HD. Is there really a need to do programming exclusively in SD during the network primetime slots? I hate watching the SD programming on the HD feed. So you either live with it or switch to the SD feed.
     
  6. Oct 13, 2009 #66 of 252
    kfcrosby

    kfcrosby Godfather

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    Some plasma's were capable to do this.
     
  7. Oct 13, 2009 #67 of 252
    Doug Brott

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    Not possible
     
  8. Oct 13, 2009 #68 of 252
    cartrivision

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    Yes. Some people were pointing that out when the 1080p VOD service was first rolled out. It's little more than marketing hype that plays on the notion that a lot of people think that 1080p/24 is providing something that 1080i/60 can't provide.
     
  9. Oct 13, 2009 #69 of 252
    Stuart Sweet

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    I disagree. For 24fps source material, 1080p24 will give you better quality.
     
  10. Oct 13, 2009 #70 of 252
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    I'd like to call those 'experts' who put us down during recent descussions about 1080p online channels


    - TIME TO EAT THE CROW !!!
     
  11. Oct 13, 2009 #71 of 252
    cartrivision

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    That high quality that you occasionally see at the TV store has almost nothing to do with it being shown at the correct frame rate of 24fps, and is mostly because it is coming from a very high quality and high bitrate source such as a very well mastered Blu-ray disk. If you watched the same disk on a TV that only did 1080p60 it would look just as good.... maybe better, since some people actually perceive less judder effect when viewing a 24fps source after the frame rate is divided unevenly to match the 60Hz refresh rate of the TV.
     
  12. Oct 13, 2009 #72 of 252
    dorfd1

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    does the hardware support 1080p24?

    why broadcast in 1080p when people who have h20's won't see a picture improvement.

    channel 125 only says hd not hd 1080p
     
  13. Oct 13, 2009 #73 of 252
    Mike Bertelson

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    I kinda thought that is was. :scratchin

    I thought that movie source material is 24fps so 1080p24 requires no juggling of frames and preserves the original movie. I could be wrong about that but it seems to make sense...of course one could argue against 24fps as it could cause motion blur/shudder. :shrug:

    Mike
     
  14. Oct 13, 2009 #74 of 252
    cartrivision

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    You can disagree all you want, but there is not any additional spatial or temporal resolution in a 1080p/24 signal that a 1080i/60 signal can't provide given the same bitrate for both.

    Deinterlaced 1080i/60 can provide 30 full 1920 x 1080 progressive frames per second... obviously more than a 24fps source requires.
     
  15. Oct 13, 2009 #75 of 252
    Stuart Sweet

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    Do you have a TV that does 1080p/24? I'll trade you for it, since you seem to see no value in it.

    In seriousness, the quality is not a measure of the framerate, it's a measure of the absence of pulldown.
     
  16. Oct 13, 2009 #76 of 252
    cartrivision

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    The full 24 progressive frames are also in a 1080i/60 encoding of the same 24fps source, so nothing additional is "preserved" by broadcasting it in 1080p/24. If you have a TV that is capable of displaying frames at a rate that is a multiple of 24fps, then a 1080i encoding of a 24fps film can be deinterlaced into the same identical 24 progressive frames that are broadcast in a 1080p/24 transmission, and displayed on the TV screen at the correct frame rate of 24fps.
     
  17. Oct 13, 2009 #77 of 252
    Stuart Sweet

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    I think you just made my point... that displaying 1080p24 on a TV that supports 1080p24 is the best way to express source material that is 24fps.
     
  18. Oct 13, 2009 #78 of 252
    HoTat2

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    Having not visited TV broadcast facility since God knows when, I can't be completely sure, but the way I understand today is that for most TV programming in a modern station these days both HD and SD programs are recorded (or "ingested"), stored, archived, processed and played-out on computer controlled file servers (or a "file based workflow"). And as such converting between formats such as 1080i@60 and 1080P@24 when in file form this way for later play-out is readily accomplished.
     
  19. Oct 13, 2009 #79 of 252
    cartrivision

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    Why would you need a bigger hard drive to store something that was transmitted at 24 full frames per second as opposed to 60 half frames per second? (24/1) < (60/2)
     
  20. Oct 13, 2009 #80 of 252
    Doug Brott

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    Well most people these days are getting either an HR2x, H21 or H23 receiver for doing HD. Those support 1080p. H20s are not capable from my understanding.

    I'm not sure if 1080p/24 will be on channel 125 100% of the time. They may intersperse other non-1080p programming as well.
     

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