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Directv on Demand Software Rollout

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by DodgerBlue, Oct 17, 2007.

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  1. Oct 18, 2007 #81 of 160
    Canis Lupus

    Canis Lupus You make it, We break it

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    If I begin to download a "short" (say an old musical live performance etc) that's about 6-7 minutes long, I can usually start watching it within a few minutes using a 1.5 connection.
    This is not, however, how I use VOD. I usually put a few items in the download queue, and come back later or even a few days later and watch one or more of them.
    I treat VOD much like I treat a Series Link or a program I've set to record. I simply time-shift it without the expectation of a true "on-demand" experience. Works fine for me but of course it's personal preference.

     
  2. Oct 18, 2007 #82 of 160
    Radio Enginerd

    Radio Enginerd New Member

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    yes, VERY interesting.
     
  3. Oct 18, 2007 #83 of 160
    djzack67

    djzack67 Icon

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    :rolleyes:
    School me if this is located somewhere else in the forums.....

    How do we get this software update?
     
  4. Oct 18, 2007 #84 of 160
    CTJon

    CTJon Godfather

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    So if I'm going to get D* content from my cable company (which supplies my internet service) will I soon get cable content from a sat. provider?:hurah:

    But in reality folks this is getting "expensive" and complex. I have to get a wireless connector to connect my HR20 to my wireless network (last I looked some were about $200 each) and go through the complexity that some have to connect to the Internet so I can DOD. At the moment I don't have the time to watch all the current programs I am recording. There is some truth to cable saying they are less complex than where D* is going.

    I know D* needs to do this to be competative but I wonder how ultimately succesful this will be. How many people will really make heavy use of DOD? I guess if you're a heavy movie buff! But with soon to be 100000 channels what shows won't be on regular D*.

    I had a real troubling thought. With the mixing of the Internet and D* is the future of D* being just a Windows interface to a media PC to do what the DVR's do and no controller at all but just a browser screen to do all the UI work. Boy when that happens this board will be filled with threads about remembering the good old reliable HR20 days.
     
  5. Oct 18, 2007 #85 of 160
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    You wait until DirecTV pushes it to your box...
     
  6. Oct 18, 2007 #86 of 160
    Canis Lupus

    Canis Lupus You make it, We break it

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    IMO this is a way for D* to close some loopholes with customer perceptions about what Cable can provide versus Satellite.
    It's also hard to say today what the future of VOD will be for D* doing it this way, but for now it's hard to argue if you don't want to shell out your own money to get a VOD connection that you might not get much benefit from as a user.
    I only had to move some stuff around to get VOD, and didn't have to invest any more money, so it's understandable for those who might not want to do it - at least right now.

     
  7. Oct 18, 2007 #87 of 160
    tim99

    tim99 Legend

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    What I think is interesting is that using DOD would violate their ‘own’ ISP services FAP (fair access policy).
     
  8. Oct 18, 2007 #88 of 160
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Why?
     
  9. Oct 18, 2007 #89 of 160
    BK EH

    BK EH Legend

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    Would someone with a 1.5mb connection, or Earl, please clarify this.

    Why have the "may or may not affect your viewing" caveat? If the VoD downloads to the box and you watch it from there, why "may" it affect your viewing?

    Sure... it may take a lot longer to fully download. But, once it's there it's there, and your ISP connection has nothing to do with it.

    Or am I missing something that only a CE-VoD-user knows?
     
  10. Oct 18, 2007 #90 of 160
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    DoD will allow you to watch the content as it downloads.

    So if you are attempting to watch the program... and your connection is slower then "real-time", you will eventually reach the end of the program and have to wait.

    If you are the type that will wait till it is completely download, your speed will not have that impact.
     
  11. Oct 18, 2007 #91 of 160
    jash

    jash AllStar

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    sorry earl. i was just trying to help you avoid any more complaints about ce releases causing issues. when i said hard wired, i meant an ethernet cable. i think you risk usability at anything less than 3Mb and then putting that over the air just adds more loss of speeds. i would love to plug the usb wireless netgear adapter into the front of my hr20 and not have to mess with running an ethernet cable to the back of this box, trust me, but i doubt that will be enabled any time soon.
     
  12. Oct 18, 2007 #92 of 160
    tim99

    tim99 Legend

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    Not in principal but in practice. The Hughes FAP only allows 200 meg of data per day.

     
  13. Oct 18, 2007 #93 of 160
    lifelong

    lifelong Legend

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    In some cases, Comcast has a 200GB per month cap as well. I'd post a link but I don't have enough posts in my history to do so yet.
     
  14. Oct 18, 2007 #94 of 160
    seagod

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    What about a hybrid aproach such as the following:
    1. User wants to request a program via DOD so user selected program and HR20 sends in a request to D*'s server via a local broadband connection or via a phone line connection (either way it is almost like requesting a URL in that the amount of data in the request is very small).
    2. D*'s server then acknowledges the request and then send back to the HR20 the authorization.
    3. HR20 sends back to D*'s server via local broadband connection or phone that it is ready to start capture.
    4. D*s server then starts the datastream and the HR20 records the program to disk. This transmission is conducted similar to how the HughesNet/DirectWay SAT broadband service works except it is oneway and does not require a network line.
    5. Once it completes, the HR20 can notify D*'s server that it received the DOD.

    I know this is not the best solution but could work. It would still require a local broadband or phone connection but would allow for those cable companies that start implementing download limits.
     
  15. Oct 18, 2007 #95 of 160
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    This is "kinda" how it worked when they had Starz on Demand...

    It still will reach a critical point, depending on how many people try to access content.


    With that... I don't expect a "hybrid" solution...

    The closest it will get, is that highly popular content (say a new popular movie release, or something of high profile)... will get pushed to all boxes and saved in the reservered area of the box.
     
  16. Oct 18, 2007 #96 of 160
    dwcolvin

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    Linksys Wireless Bridge WET54G $79.99 at Newegg
     
  17. Oct 18, 2007 #97 of 160
    tim99

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    Are you kidding? As it is now the windows/linux frontends are the most stable, dependable and full featured PVR solutions on the planet. Far far far more advanced that an HR20/Tivo.


     
  18. Oct 18, 2007 #98 of 160
    ChicagoTC

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    Whether you hard wire your HR20 or use a wireless bridge should have little to no affect on your VOD speeds. Even running a 802.11b bridge in less then ideal conditions your getting 3-4mb of throughout. If your WAN speed is only 3MB it doesn't matter if you connect your HR20 through a gig switch your chokepoint is still your 3mb WAN connection.

    Also I'm pushing my CO distance limits with DSL and I get anywhere between 1.5 and 2mb WAN speeds and VOD works fine. Granted I can't push download and watch, but as long as I build up a 5-6 minute buffer it's fine.
     
  19. Oct 18, 2007 #99 of 160
    michaelyork29

    michaelyork29 Godfather

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    Earl, do we actually know how fast D*'s servers are? For example, lets say I had a 1,000,000,000mb connection at my home (of course, impossible)...what would be the cap for D*'s server to let me download it at...

    Sorry, I know that this post is badly worded... :) ;)
     
  20. lovswr

    lovswr Godfather

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    My WAG is that the cable providers, like Comcast, Cablevision, Time Warner & DSL (namely the Death Star) would go apesh*&*&t. Say 1 million D* peeps start downloading HD programs on a regualer basis, maybe 2 a day. Those broadband providers could use that to quash net neutrality while still in it's nascent stages or worse.


    From a marketing standpoint I could see why D* would like to get this out but keep this on the downlow so that their would not raise too much of a stink. I have seen some rumors that D* may try to partner with some national broadband provider to not only provide the Triple PlaY option, but to also to provide the broadband access for the DoD program.
     
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