1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

DirecTV planning for Ultra-HD

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by espnjason, Mar 15, 2012.

  1. Mar 15, 2012 #21 of 141
    Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

    23,054
    152
    Aug 22, 2006
    Lower...
    Just to be clear (no pun intended :p), I was referring to the same HD source content viewed from 10' away on a calibrated 42" 1080p display sitting next to a calibrated 42" 480p display, as opposed to, e.g., viewing the same DirecTV HD vs. SD channel on the same 1080 display.
     
  2. Mar 15, 2012 #22 of 141
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

    6,503
    98
    Mar 18, 2006
    Teays...
    I understand the viewing distance part. But in my media room at 10-12', would someone be able to tell the difference on my 70" display?

    PS. Size always matters. ;) :lol:
     
  3. Mar 15, 2012 #23 of 141
    cypherx

    cypherx Hall Of Fame

    3,470
    67
    Aug 27, 2010
    PA - Berks...
    I agree with you. Ku or Ka really doesn't determine if UHD is possible. It's more like transponder bandwidth and most importantly, the encoding / compression used. If anything Ku would allow them to use higher order modulation like 8PSK and lower error correction.

    As far as DVRing it, maybe in 5 years the price of SSD's will be more consumer friendly along with a higher storage capacity.
     
  4. Mar 15, 2012 #24 of 141
    mreposter

    mreposter Hall Of Fame

    1,711
    1
    Jul 29, 2006
    Embracing new technology is great, but when D14 shows up and most of it's bandwidth gets chewed up by the huge data streams to support UHD, it'll be really frustrating to still be stuck with dozens of sucky SD channels.

    But, yeah, it sounds cool ;)
     
  5. Mar 15, 2012 #25 of 141
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,566
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    Probably not. At 10' away on a 70" screen, you're not even getting the full benefit of 1080p.

    If you moved up to 7.5', then yes, you'd start to see the benefit of 4K.

    I wouldn't see the benefit of 4K in my living room either, but in my theater where I sit 12.5' away from my 126" display, 4K would be very noticeable.
     
  6. Mar 15, 2012 #26 of 141
    mdavej

    mdavej Hall Of Fame

    2,401
    32
    Jan 30, 2007
    How about they concentrate on going from 480 lines to 1080 before making the leap to 4000?
     
  7. Mar 15, 2012 #27 of 141
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
    183
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    DIRECTV is running fewer and wider transponders with Ka but the yield is relatively low if they can only fit 5-6 channels in 36MHz. Looking at what they're doing on 119W, they have seven HD channels set up (only two are active) on transponder 23 which is only 24MHz wide.
    The larger the files, the more grass that will be trampled on the SSD by each one. I don't think SSD is going to replace magnetic storage for DVR use.
     
  8. Mar 15, 2012 #28 of 141
    Alan Gordon

    Alan Gordon Chancellor

    9,094
    100
    Jun 7, 2004
    Dawson, Georgia
    I wasn't planning on letting you live down your earlier statement, but I'll give you a little slack based on your clarification above, even though I could still see the difference.

    I have an HR24-100 connected to a 20-inch SDTV. Not a great comparison, but I used to have an HR24-100 and TiVo Series 3 connected to a 50-inch SDTV, as well as an Hughes HTL-HD receiver and HR10-250 connected to a 30-inch FP widescreen SDTV. When connected to high quality sources, the picture was impressive. However, any focusing on the differences would reveal the massive differences... particularly in the areas of depth and color reproductions.

    However, the fact that the differences are even comparable is due to the fact that they both started with a GREAT source. Good quality DirecTV HD or OTA was far superior to HD-LITE, and Blu-ray was far superior to DirecTV HD and OTA. I strongly suspect that Ultra-HD sources downconverted to HDTVs will look superior to the current 1920x1080 feeds.

    On the other hand, it has been said that current 1920x1080 feeds will look far superior when viewed on Ultra-HDTVs.

    Depends on the person. Some people can't tell the difference between DVDs and Blu-ray. Some can't tell the difference between 720p and 1080i/p. The technology will be there, but it will be dependent upon the abilities of the person viewing it.

    ~Alan
     
  9. Mar 15, 2012 #29 of 141
    David Ortiz

    David Ortiz Save the Clock Tower!!

    2,427
    75
    Aug 21, 2006
    Fresno, CA
    If you have a 150" screen, the image is going to look a lot better if the source is 4K. There is only so much enlargement 1920x1080 can take before it falls apart.
     
  10. Mar 15, 2012 #30 of 141
    Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

    23,054
    152
    Aug 22, 2006
    Lower...
    It may have to do with the type of display as well, because what you're describing above is not the case with my calibrated Panny 480p ED plasma. With HD source material, the differences were subtle, at best, from ~ 10 feet away.

    FWIW, I think this is a pretty good take on when 1080p resolution matters. It includes a nifty chart that's helpful (IMHO) calculating what screen sizes and resolutions are optimal for given viewing distances.
     
  11. Mar 15, 2012 #31 of 141
    Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 Active Member

    6,659
    14
    Sep 3, 2007
    Haha...now that is some funny BS!
     
  12. Mar 15, 2012 #32 of 141
    RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

    16,473
    133
    Aug 5, 2002
    Dripping...
    Really don't understand this:
    Why would they want to give up 32 transponders in prime real estate?
     
  13. Mar 15, 2012 #33 of 141
    Alan Gordon

    Alan Gordon Chancellor

    9,094
    100
    Jun 7, 2004
    Dawson, Georgia
    You used the word optimal... I can't argue either way with that.

    However, they are not "equivalent."

    ~Alan
     
  14. Mar 15, 2012 #34 of 141
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

    12,182
    105
    Sep 28, 2006
    Middle...
    I don't think FCC allocations expire unless a broadcaster cease using them. So maybe they are considering bargaining, trading or leasing to other providers in exchange for more bandwidth in another segment of spectrum?
     
  15. Mar 15, 2012 #35 of 141
    JoeTheDragon

    JoeTheDragon Hall Of Fame

    4,639
    34
    Jul 21, 2008
    can they use the KU band for mpeg 4? or is it cheapter to just put a new KA sat in the KU place?
     
  16. Mar 15, 2012 #36 of 141
    Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

    9,139
    28
    Sep 16, 2006
    The compression used has nothing to do with the band used. There is mpeg4 currently on C band, KU band, and KA band from various companies.
     
  17. Mar 15, 2012 #37 of 141
    RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

    16,473
    133
    Aug 5, 2002
    Dripping...
    The satellites don't care what it is, it's just 0's and 1's to them.
     
  18. Mar 15, 2012 #38 of 141
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

    12,182
    105
    Sep 28, 2006
    Middle...
    Yep.

    And furthermore, Directv has to have a direct-to-home license for whatever bandwidth they use. For instance, right now they broadcast Ku from 101. The also broadcast Ka from 101, but only to and from their own uplink facilities, as "backhaul" feeds. So far as I know (but I haven't looked lately), they do not have a license for Ka to the home from 101.
     
  19. Mar 15, 2012 #39 of 141
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    22,145
    192
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    It's just a PR buzz to raise attention to the company ...
     
  20. Mar 15, 2012 #40 of 141
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,566
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    Your missing the point. 4K on a 150" screen from 20' away is not going to look better than 1080p, because at that distance the "eye" isn't even getting the full benefit of 1080p.

    4K on a 46" display from 3', however, will look a lot better.
     

Share This Page