DIRECTV Satellite Discussion D-15 @103W

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Gary Toma, Jun 4, 2014.

  1. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Directv has stated it "would" be used for that in FCC filings for satellites as well as in a couple other public statements. If you think it about it for two seconds, it is pretty obvious it makes much more sense to use it for a new service that will grow over time rather than causing a million customers to want a new LNB overnight. Just like they did with Ka and HD.
     
  2. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    I know and hope you are right about the higher swim channel limit, but we don't know at all for sure anything about that possibility. And I have a feeling that if they do launch a new swim lnb like that it will be used for all installs. They could save time and money knowing all people could receive all programming from any of those birds. Also would make it easier to get all programming off the 95(?) sat and maybe even 119, because they could use some bss spectrum for that too, since those markets will require new lnbs anyway, at least many will if not all...

    I have been starting to think though that they will move all that stuff to d14 and d15 without using BSS, and add a lot of hd, (there is room) and use 119 to point at PR and give them what D14 and D15 can't provide via their plus transponder setups.
     
  3. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

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    Well ...

    I know they are a launch provider and therefore probably not too interested in providing accurate info, about the communications payloads of the satellites they launch.

    But for the record anyhow, according to the FCC docs. D15 has 32 Ku band CONUS xpndrs, not "28."

    38 of which up to 24 active Ka band xpndrs and 18 RDBS band xpndrs. Not "25 Ka-band/Rev-band active xpndrs."

    SKYM-1 data appears to be accurate though ...
     
  4. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    The application forms and narratives for DIRECTV 14, DIRECTV 15, RB1 and RB2 make no mention of Ultra HD content that I could find. Both the DIRECTV 14 and DIRECTV 15 narratives repeatedly mention HD content specifically but make no mention of higher quality formats. To be fair, when they were applied for, UHD was probably a pipe dream.

    In the Q4 2014 conference call, Mike White mentioned that DIRECTV 14 would bring "additional capacity for new services such as 4K Ultra HD." There was no specific mention of the band that would be used and as is apparent, what UHD they're currently delivering to subscribers is riding on Ka band.
    I absolutely agree with your reasoning but it is just reasoning. I'm looking for an authoritative indication that this is what DIRECTV intends to do and that doesn't seem to be available yet even though you're assuring me that it can be derived from bits and bites.

    Given the UHD offerings that have been thus far been hinted at, there doesn't appear to be any need to turn up any RDBS bandwidth to support it. Until such time that there is a need, the RDBS payloads would seem to be relegated to squatting as far as residential subscribers are concerned.
     
  5. studechip

    studechip Godfather

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    And until the bird is alive, your opinion is shear conjecture.
     
  6. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    As James Long posted recently here, the FCC requirements for putting spectrum to use is not that high a bar. Calling it "squatting" because they aren't using it the minute the satellite reaches orbit is your wrong opinion, that's not how the FCC sees it and their opinion is the only one that matters.

    Since no one is using RDBS anywhere in the US (maybe in the whole world) yet even if they were squatting what would it matter, since it isn't as though everyone is lining up wishing they could get their hands on the spectrum. Dish holds licenses for at least 4 RDBS locations and AFAIK they don't even have a satellite to fill them on the drawing board. Who's squatting now?
     
  7. David Ortiz

    David Ortiz Save the Clock Tower!!

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    I posted a link to a DIRECTV filing from December 16, 2013 which contains the following:

    'By doing so, it asks the Commission to effectively ratify its efforts to block DIRECTV from operating state-of-the-art 17/24 GHz BSS satellites that will be used to provide the first ever commercial "ultra HD" television service in the United States.'

    They even call it "ultra HD."

    http://www.swys.org/filings/id/6017481179

     
  8. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    It goes on to say "The Commission must not reward such conduct. It should deny SES's** application. Failing that, it should at least defer action on this application until such time as SES ameliorates the effects of its prior activities by entering into appropriate spectrum coordination arrangements. Doing otherwise would invite future regulatory gamesmanship and run directly contrary to the Commission's ultimate criterion ­ the U.S. public interest."

    Web folk who put up gobs of text in grey - whole documents—should be drawn and quartered.....

    **SES Americom, Inc. - some DISH entity, though it's not readily apparent who they are from the filing.
     
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  9. cforrest

    cforrest Icon

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  10. MarkN

    MarkN Legend

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    I keep hearing Directv-15 is the most powerful satellite ever made for DTV. In what way?
     
  11. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    The amount of power its solar panels can generate, which allow it to power more transponders at once.
     
  12. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    30 high power transponders in Ku-band, 24 transponders in Ka-band, 18 transponders in Reverse Band, and will be able to operate from up to five orbital locations from 99 W to 119 W, covering Continental US (CONUS), Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico.
     
  13. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

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    Up to 32 xpndrs for the Ku band ...

    Sent from my SGH-M819N using Tapatalk
     
  14. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I stand corrected.
     
  15. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    They are separate from DISH ... but they are working with DISH on this project.

    SES is a global complany ... Americom is their US branch.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SES_Americom
     
  16. woj027

    woj027 Icon

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    I don't understand the "able to operate from up to five orbital locations from 99 W to 119 W, covering Continental US (CONUS), Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico"

    I always thought you could move a satellite anywhere to use it, not some specific slot.

    I understand you need approval to work from a slot, but couldn't western hemisphere sat work in the eastern hemisphere? or couldn't this one work at 95? I get that it may not work for the US, but somewhere else? Say DirecTV somehow got a deal for Canada?
     
  17. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    They mean it has the all the right transponders for Directv to use it at any of their current satellite locations. In the past all their satellites have been limited, like the one at 119 could be used at 119 or 101, but not 99 or 103 because it doesn't have the right transponders. Likewise all the current satellites at 99 and 103 could be used at either 99 or 103, but not 101, 110 or 119 because they don't have Ku transponders.
     
  18. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    To add to this and the other good answers, one of the measures of satellites is the power capacity of the entire system at end of life. Thus it includes solar power generating capacity, battery storage, and electricity bus. The more electricity the satellite can generate, store, and use, the more power it can send to earth.

    Satellites SW-1 and 2 were incredibly flexible spacecraft (and available at bargain prices as Hughesnet ended up not needing them), but their power generation and storage left them unable to broadcast CONUS. Thus they make great spotbeam satellites for local channels.

    Peace,
    Tom
     
  19. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    One limitation can be the reflectors sending the transponder amplifier energy to the Earth. More and more they are tuned to provide a particular footprint (generally the US or US with Mexico). While there is some flexibility in the reflector, they are no longer able to be placed anywhere in the satellite belt for US use. If the footprint is close enough for another use, yes it can be moved to another location and pointed to that region--if the ITU and countries involved all agree.

    From a DIRECTV standpoint, Slice's excellent answer also applies. This satellite can serve many roles in the DIRECTV fleet. (Don't know if it can do all the spotbeams some other satellites do.)

    Peace,
    Tom
     
  20. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Slowly.

    (While I am understanding that complex and overlapping style sheets can have unintended consequences of grey text, that doesn't excuse someone from not double checking their work and verifying the final results....)
     
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