DIRECTV Satellite Discussion DLA-1 @95W

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by egakagoc2xi, Aug 18, 2014.

  1. Oct 16, 2014 #61 of 214
    peds48

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    Lift off!!!
     
  2. Oct 16, 2014 #62 of 214
    DBSSTEPHEN

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    What is that satellite for


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  3. Oct 16, 2014 #63 of 214
    HoTat2

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    Mostly for DIRECTV Latin America;

    Largely replacing and expanding the services of the old satellite there Galaxy 3C at 95W.
     
  4. Oct 16, 2014 #64 of 214
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    That's a consideration but it's not a very constraining one. If it was, you couldn't ever have a continuous window - you'd have to have pauses and gaps throughout the window as multiple satellites passed through your so-called "safe corridor."

    Rather, the biggest reasons to have specific launch windows for comsats is range availability - you can only clear downrange airspace and navigable waters for limited lengths of time, and your down-range tracking assets may not be available except inasmuch as you make sure the tracking stations are manned and ready, tracking aircraft or ships are positioned, you have time booked/arranged on high-capacity communications networks to relay that data back to the launch and spacecraft control centers, etc. Also, your launch team can only stay ready for a certain amount of time before they begin to lose their edge and need downtime.

    A secondary reason is launch vehicle or GSE-related. Vehicle propellants are often cryogenic (at least the oxidizer) and LOX continually boiling off as the temperature rises in the tanks. That LOX escapes from pressure relief valves as gaseous oxygen, so LOX must be replenished. Launch complexes can only maintain that kind of flow for limited periods before they have to replenish the ground tanks. Further, the gaseous oxygen that escapes during tanking and launch preps is cold - that leads to ice condensation on the vehicle and extended low temps in and around the vent valves and such. Some components of the launcher and/or GSE may have limited cold-soak times and have to be allowed to warm back up. Those components may have to be inspected after the temperature cycle before the next launch attempt. Many times payloads are supplied with conditioned purge gases such as cool, dry N2 - again, the capacity of the ground systems to supply those purge gases continuously during the count and any hold times is limited by GSE.

    And so on, and so on, and so on ...
     
  5. Oct 17, 2014 #65 of 214
    doctor j

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    Are the TLE data reports available yet for Intelsat 30??
    I have used Space-Track in the past but can't find any reports on yesterday's launch.

    Doctor j
     
  6. Oct 17, 2014 #66 of 214
    HoTat2

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    I'm pretty sure it's one of these four most recent listed under celestrak;s (updated daily) "Launches in Last 30 Days" category http://www.celestrak.com/NORAD/elements/tle-new.txt.

    But the problem is as you can see, they don't label the TLEs here by the name of the satellite. Only the international designator "2014-062A, B, C, and D."

    So which one refers to IS30/DLA-1 and the others ArSat-1 or parts of the launcher, I don't know right now. At least at this early phase.

    2014-062A
    1 40271U 14062A 14289.95629022 -.00000524 00000-0 00000+0 0 33
    2 40271 5.8684 180.4529 7273414 175.8483 31.2704 2.30104409 00

    2014-062B
    1 40272U 14062B 14289.95883551 -.00000533 00000-0 00000+0 0 22
    2 40272 5.8528 180.3612 7275138 176.4139 32.9780 2.27367739 05

    2014-062C
    1 40273U 14062C 14289.96112388 -.00001258 10989-5 00000+0 0 13
    2 40273 5.9845 177.7593 7276106 178.2991 35.5110 2.31610664 08

    2014-062D
    1 40274U 14062D 14289.96473029 -.00000524 00000-0 00000+0 0 19
    2 40274 6.0286 177.7359 7278488 178.6362 38.1782 2.29656085 09
     
  7. Oct 17, 2014 #67 of 214
    doctor j

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    Thank you.
    I found these a bit ago and have j-sat images of the orbit but have forgotten how to get images into posts.
    Haven't post any pix since D-12
    What format for image?and how to post?
    Doesn't seem obvious to me and can't find any help files on 'NEW" site

    Doctor j
     
  8. Oct 17, 2014 #68 of 214
    doctor j

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    I suspect A and B are the payloads.
    C and D may be the "2nd" stages.
    Right now all 4 orbits are essentally the same
    Doctor j
     
  9. Oct 17, 2014 #69 of 214
    doctor j

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    Images of 4 "pieces" of yesterday's Arianspace launch.

    Doctor j 10_17_2014_Arianespace_2.PNG 10_17_2014_Arianspace.PNG
     
  10. Oct 17, 2014 #70 of 214
    HoTat2

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    Yeah;

    That's essentially what I'm thinking as well.

    A and B are most likely the satellites (maybe A is IS30?) and C and D are likely from the launcher's upper stage and the SYLDA payload dispenser.
     
  11. Oct 17, 2014 #71 of 214
    doctor j

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    Anyone know how to turn OFF the "cone" in jsat tracker??
    Doctor j
     
  12. Oct 18, 2014 #72 of 214
    HoTat2

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    So as not to be dogmatic since I can't be 100% certain yet, I'll still post all four of the most recent TLEs associated with the launch of IS30/DLA-1. But I really believe "2014-062A" (in red) is the satellite we're interested in since the "A" letter designation is used on all other Intelsat birds (whenever they contain a letter) in GEO listed by celestrak.

    So keep your eye on it especially.

    EDIT Note: While possibly foot in mouth, I see SatBeams is reporting that "2014-062B" is IS30/DLA-1. I'm not so sure though since SB has the NORAD catalog numbers reversed with 40271U as 2014-062B whereas celestrak has it as 2014-062A.

    Therefore, I think SB has it wrong and still believe 2014-062A is actually IS30/DLA-1 and 2014-062B is ArSat-1.

    2014-062A
    1 40271U 14062A 14290.71933376 -.00000536 00000-0 00000+0 0 65
    2 40271 5.9509 178.4209 7281867 178.4961 296.6184 2.27821857 19


    2014-062B
    1 40272U 14062B 14290.72543779 -.00000535 00000-0 00000+0 0 59
    2 40272 5.9465 178.4166 7282075 178.5205 302.3804 2.28122903 18


    2014-062C
    1 40273U 14062C 14290.73869068 -.00000533 00000-0 00000+0 0 40
    2 40273 6.0058 176.5669 7279556 180.3037 314.0810 2.28363568 11

    2014-062D
    1 40274U 14062D 14290.77369395 -.00000535 00000-0 00000+0 0 45
    2 40274 5.9466 178.2965 7279839 178.6471 341.7439 2.27975221 15
     
  13. Oct 18, 2014 #73 of 214
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    Just FYI, and not that Space-Trak is very vigilant in enforcing it, but the user agreement for obtaining TLE's states that you can use them for your own purposes but won't repost them (not sure what kind of sense that makes, but hey, it's the government ...).

    Anyway, NORAD/Space Command convention has been to generally designate the primary payload of a particular launch with the "A." Sometimes they get it wrong initially and later correct it.
     
  14. Oct 18, 2014 #74 of 214
    HoTat2

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    OK, well if the mods. warn me to stop then I will.

    But I have to say regularly re-posting TLEs here on the board after a satellite launch has been a pretty common thing for a long time now of course ...
     
  15. Oct 18, 2014 #75 of 214
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    Yeah, I know; I probably did it myself more than once during the D10 and D11 days. They get posted all over the 'net. I'm just pointing out what Space-Trak says as a friendly FYI, just in case you're worried about it. I don't do it anymore, but that's me. YMMV.
     
  16. Oct 18, 2014 #76 of 214
    HoTat2

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    Thought this would be an informative piece for the non-specialists (like most of us here :) ) posted recently on the Intelsat blog summarizing the events following IS30/DLA-1's launch for the layman.

    And even the professional might find it somewhat enlightening as well, at least as to how Intelsat does these things specifically.


    Three Questions about a Satellite Launch Answered
    [​IMG]On the afternoon of the launch of the Intelsat 30 satellite, Jon Harborne, Senior Manager, Intelsat Spacecraft Program Office, answers some frequently asked questions about what happens during and just after the launch.
    Who controls the satellite when it’s launched?
    It’s a carefully choreographed sequence. First, the SSL (manufacturing) team in Kourou powers up the satellite 10 hours before launch and gets everything configured. Then, Arianespace (the launcher) starts the launch day countdown and loads the rocket with liquid oxygen and hydrogen. After that, if everything is looking good, the launch base goes into the final countdown phase and launches the rocket.

    Once the boosters are ignited, the rocket takes off under the control of its flight computers, and climbs and accelerates for about 28 minutes before releasing the satellite. Then at the Intelsat Launch Control Center in Long Beach, Ca. (pictured), we watch for telemetry from one of our downrange ground stations. When we get a good signal we send commands to configure the satellite for the next phase: orbit-raising.
    What happens when the satellite is released from the rocket?
    The Ariane 5 rocket releases the satellite into a transfer orbit, which is an elliptical orbit that just clears the atmosphere at 240 km above the earth on its nearest approach (perigee), and goes out as far as about 36,000 km at its farthest point (apogee). In the orbit-raising phase, the controllers use the satellite’s own propulsion system to boost the orbit to a circular path above the equator, with an altitude of just under 36,000 km. This is known as the geostationary orbit because in this orbit, satellites orbit the earth at the same rate as the earth rotates, and therefore appear to be stationary when viewed from the earth. This makes it easier for Intelsat to track them with a ground antenna pointing to a fixed point along the geostationary arc.

    How long does it take to get the satellite on orbit?
    Firing the satellite’s main thruster when the satellite is at its apogee has the effect of raising the perigee, and by doing this four or five times, the perigee is raised to the same altitude as the apogee, resulting in a circular orbit. In the case of Intelsat 30, it is expected to take about eight days to accomplish the orbit raising.


    - See more at: http://www.intelsat.com/blog/intelsat-launches-blog/three-questions-about-a-satellite-launch-answered/#sthash.Cw1VJPe4.dpuf
     
  17. Oct 20, 2014 #77 of 214
    doctor j

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    No new TLE since Friday evening.
    Above suggested it might only take 8 days to get to Geostationary orbit.
    Doesn't appear that any manuvers have started yet.
    Impatient, I AM

    Doctor j
     
  18. Oct 20, 2014 #78 of 214
    HoTat2

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    There's been an update since Friday for 2014-062B I notice, which I think is ArSat-1.

    2014-062B
    1 40272U 14062B 14292.76788265 -.00000438 00000-0 00000+0 0 69
    2 40272 5.9436 177.7575 7277451 180.0175 179.6537 2.28112632 69

    But nothing for the other three, in particular 2014-062A which I'm pretty sure is IS30/DLA-1. So I just didn't bother to post anything.
     
  19. Oct 20, 2014 #79 of 214
    doctor j

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    Yes, I'm aware.
    I've checked space track Q4 hours with no joy!!
    I did see in one of the Arianespace blogs that Intelesat 30 was 2014-062A

    Doctor j
     
  20. Oct 20, 2014 #80 of 214
    HoTat2

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    Yeah...

    Just noticed the Russian "Zarya" website listing the COSPAR number as "2014-062A" as well.

    Though it says "Designation and Catalog number are subject to confirmation" I think it's pretty safe at this point to exclude the other three pieces of the launch now and just post the TLE's and other related info. pertaining to just that one.

    http://www.zarya.info/Diaries/Launches/Launches.php?year=2014
     

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