1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Directv vs DISH - Which HD is better

Discussion in 'General Satellite Discussion' started by DesertRatR, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. Apr 9, 2013 #81 of 103
    lparsons21

    lparsons21 Hall Of Fame

    4,357
    219
    Mar 4, 2006
    Herrin, IL
    Land Cruiser as it turns out. My dad had bought it used in '57 for about $200 as I remember and gave it to me in 1960 when I got my drivers license. It was the single most reliable car I had up until this 2009 Buick I own now. Always started, always ran and usually beat others with their Chevys and Fords when we drag raced on the back country roads.
     
  2. Apr 9, 2013 #82 of 103
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,345
    503
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    SD might be better, but at least based on someone I know on EA, not convinced it would be worth it. He had to have two dishes for domestic channels, and at one point Dish moved our locals to a satellite that couldn't be seen by either dish. I'll take bad SD over that.
     
  3. Apr 10, 2013 #83 of 103
    RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

    3,145
    12
    Jan 23, 2008
    Do you see a frog and a bear in a brown Studebaker?

    Nooo, but I see a frog and a bear in a rainbow colored Studebaker!
     
  4. Apr 10, 2013 #84 of 103
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
    183
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    The old subscription to DIRECTV makes one omniscient and expert in everything ploy.
     
  5. Jun 11, 2014 #85 of 103
    widmark

    widmark Cool Member

    34
    0
    Sep 4, 2012
    Folks have said here that DirecTV has better HD than Dish. I have Directv now thinking of switching to Dish.

    I happen to have only 720p tvs. But they take 1080i inputs and the quality of Directv was a very noticeable improvement from TimeWarner Cable HD.

    What is the technical reason DirecTV is better in HD than Dish? I saw somewhere that Directv figured out how to deliver 1080p over SAT. Perhaps Dish has not?

    If the difference is Dish broadcasts HD in 1080i and Directv in 1080p, then I wouldn't notice the difference anyway on my 720p tvs.

    I plan to skip 1080 tv sets and wait for 4K... but presumably 2+ years down the line when there is sufficient content.
     
  6. Jun 11, 2014 #86 of 103
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    22,626
    242
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    dish transforming source material from 1920x1080i to 1440x1080i and keep 1280x720p
     
  7. Jun 11, 2014 #87 of 103
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

    7,531
    435
    Jun 26, 2010
    Texas City, TX
    Wouldn't 1440 x 1080i create a weird ratio ? Wouldn't it have to be 1440 x 810 or close ?
     
  8. Jun 11, 2014 #88 of 103
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    22,626
    242
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    it's the same as SD 720x540
    4:3
     
    their IRD making reverse transformation and you will not see it if you don't know that or you are not a professional

    it was typo [640 vs 540=1080/2]
     
  9. Jun 11, 2014 #89 of 103
    widmark

    widmark Cool Member

    34
    0
    Sep 4, 2012
    Thanks for the quick reply Mr Fix.

    Does dish now broadcast all channels in MPEG4 to west coast where I am?

    I see from other threads that Dish essentially compresses a lower res video stream to a lower bit rate resulting in lower pic quality. At least if they are using MPEG4 they are using a more efficient compression codec than MPEG2 given the same bit rate.

    On my 720p tvs the lower resolution of Dish HD vs DirecTV shouldn't make much f any perceptible difference, but the lower bit rate might.
     
  10. Jun 11, 2014 #90 of 103
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,345
    503
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    DirecTV does have 1080p, but doesn't really matter to any degree. It's only on certain PPV movies. No channel uses it, they are all either 720p or 1080i. Compression makes a bigger difference, as does the codec used. Time Warner at least in my market still uses MPEG2. Bad quality and takes up a lot of drive space for HD.
     
  11. Jun 11, 2014 #91 of 103
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

    7,531
    435
    Jun 26, 2010
    Texas City, TX
    Isn't it supposed to be 720 x 540 ? for 4 to 3 ratio ?

    What I have been reading is that they use the rectangle pixel method where a pixel is 1.33 wide vs 1 tall and the 1.33 simulates the same HD that we get with the 1920 x 1080i.
    One of these days I will get the opportunity to see a setup with HD and compare the quality for myself. The 2 people I know with Dish both have / had SD service.
    Oh well.
     
  12. Jun 11, 2014 #92 of 103
    slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    7,606
    774
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    Even if you knew someone with Dish HD it would be hard to compare. The variations between good and bad TVs is going to be lot bigger than the variation between Directv and Dish HD. To truly compare you'd need to do it side by side on the same TV, trying several channels to get a representative sample. Not very many people subscribe to both, except maybe during a small window of overlap when they're switching from one to the other.
     
  13. Jun 11, 2014 #93 of 103
    widmark

    widmark Cool Member

    34
    0
    Sep 4, 2012
    From prior posts it appears:

    DTV Dish
    Typical HD Res: 1920x1080i 1440x1080i

    Typical HD Codec...
    ... (West/East): MP-4/MP-4 ? / MP-4 MP-4 = MPEG-4

    Typical HD Bitrate: ? ? <10, and DTV is likely variable bit rate, but what is typical for each?


    There was an article about this some time ago, but just shows bit rates for DTV and Dish are "less than 10". I'm looking for more precision.

    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/ou/heres-what-fake-hd-video-looks-like/962
     
  14. Jun 11, 2014 #94 of 103
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    22,626
    242
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    HD West/East compressed by H.264 (MPEG-4 is "an envelope" and could carry H.263 and a few different audio comp algos)

    bitrate of each channel (!) is very, have wide range - no such thing as "typical"; if you want get something palpable, get _average_ : write same movie, get it's time and file size, thus AVG will mean something

    zdnet ? who is need stinking zdnet, if you are at Dbstalk ?! I did post the numbers for _same_ channel from both providers, measure on-time stream of same material ...
     
  15. Jun 11, 2014 #95 of 103
    widmark

    widmark Cool Member

    34
    0
    Sep 4, 2012
    You make a good point clarifying codec P Smith thanks. Will be glad when .h265 is implemented although I'm sure it will be awhile. I thought some of the .h264 SAT signals ended up in .m2ts containers but it doesn't matter what container for the purposes of this question anyway.

    Average bit rate does matter, even if its just an average, and we should call it that rather than "typical"-- thats fair. Bit rate may be unknowable given the variability between HD channels and programming, but it gives a sense of quality of the stream. Its sounding to me like DirecTV HD signals are closer to 10 and Dish closer to 7s in megabit/s, but that is just speculation. Was hoping someone had tighter/tested numbers. Where are your posted bit rate numbers... do you have a link?

    DTV Dish
    Typical HD Res: 1920x1080i 1440x1080i

    Typical HD Codec...
    ... (West/East): .h264/.h264 .h264/.h264

    Average HD Bitrate: ? ? <10, and DTV is likely variable bit rate, but what is typical for each?
     
  16. Jun 11, 2014 #96 of 103
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    22,626
    242
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    add to that, some HD channels coming in 720p

    I did post snapshots of real bandwidth here ... it was last years and it was same discussion's matter
     
  17. Jun 12, 2014 #97 of 103
    slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    7,606
    774
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    h.265 will only be used for 4K, since no receivers from Directv or Dish support it there is no way it can be used for lower resolutions.
     
  18. Jun 12, 2014 #98 of 103
    cypherx

    cypherx Hall Of Fame

    3,472
    68
    Aug 27, 2010
    PA - Berks...
    That stinks they just cant download the codec to the receiver. There's such a thing as software defined radio, but no software defined codec? Oh wait, that would be a PC. I download codec packs to play video and that works. Too bad the receivers cant.
     
  19. Jun 12, 2014 #99 of 103
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    22,626
    242
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    now you know the difference between universal computer and specialized receiver ;)
     
  20. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    7,606
    774
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    Not every PC has the horsepower to decode h.265, especially for 4K video. Current models do, but for some older ones it wouldn't be possible for it to decode h.265 in real time. You could install a h.265 codec, but if it can't keep up, it wouldn't be of much use.

    PCs have a lot more computational power at their disposal than a set top box (and that's one reason they cost more to build) Thus set tops rely on hardware decoders to keep cost in check and avoid running too hot for fanless devices.

    FWIW, while software defined radio has been around for a long time, it is just starting to be used in the satellite, television and cellular industries. That should tell you something about "cool technology" versus "cost effective technology" :)
     

Share This Page