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DirecTV with a Generator

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by llupin, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. BlackDynamite

    BlackDynamite Legend

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    The point is the portable is much cheaper, you can also use it for other things, it's a lot less work to install, and you can take it with you if you ever move.

    Those things obviously won't be important to everyone, but for someone like me who is low on cash at the moment, the portable option is sounding pretty good. Plus, I live in an earthquake area so if I ever need to use it for an extended period of time, chances are there won't be any natural gas anyway.
     
  2. loudo

    loudo Well-Known Member

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    Good idea. It sure makes life easier after a storm, even if they just require them to be able to run their pumps. Well, I guess they also need to run the computer and cash registers.
     
  3. loudo

    loudo Well-Known Member

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    Rich, the average tank size is 120 gal, they use for whole home generators,and how long they last depends on how big the unit is and how much wattage it is producing. I posted a chart I got from one of my estimates in this post. Maybe it will help you. My gas guy put in 2 - 120 gal tanks (hooked together) for my 14k Generac and we also use LP from them for the gas fireplace.
     
  4. Sixto

    Sixto Well-Known Member

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    With the generator arriving today, I'm now more convinced then ever that portable was the right decision, especially after tracking usage with TED all day.
     
  5. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    A generator that runs on natural gas is likely to be as useless as your regular electrical service if you have a bad enough earthquake... I think the choice is somewhat dependent where you live to be honest.
     
  6. loudo

    loudo Well-Known Member

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    I liked having the unlimited supply of natural gas when we lived in Florida, but where we live in Maine, we are to far out in the country. You can only get it in the populated areas of the city.

    Also, the generators output less wattage using NG than you do with LP. My Generac 14K shows an output of 14k with LP and only 13K with NG.
     
  7. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I know the portable is cheaper, I realize a lot of folks can't afford the big ones. If that legislature passes, I might not get a whole house genny. I would get one more portable generator tho. Another thing to consider is the value added to your home if you sell it.

    Hmm. Never considered earthquakes. Good point.

    Rich
     
  8. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Many of our gas stations aren't car repair facilities, they just pump gas. I'd think a couple portables would be enough for a small station. Of course, the bill's in the legislature now and nobody knows what the outcome will be.

    Rich
     
  9. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I saw that post, wasn't considering propane so I didn't pay much attention to it. So a 14K genny running at half power would eat up a 120 gallon tank in ~ 60 hours of running. Back to the NG. Thanx for the link.

    Rich
     
  10. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Agreed. We've never had our gas go out in the over 26 years we've lived in our house, but that means nothing.

    Rich
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Been to the middle of Maine. Went to Millinocket for a week. Not much up there. Too bad you can't get a wood powered genny. Seriously.

    Rich
     
  12. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Been thinking about those big diesel generators we had at work. They also had batteries to keep the power on briefly and start the diesel engines. Each had a bank of 6 cell batteries that would output 120V and that was changed to AC if the power went out.

    So, what do the whole home gennys do for power between losing power and starting up? Gotta be a battery and that means it's gotta be on a charger of some sort. More maintenance.

    I'd like to see the electrical drawings for these things before we buy one.

    Rich
     
  13. patmurphey

    patmurphey Godfather

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    With Generacs and other air cooled generators, power will be off for 10 to 30 seconds during startup. There is a battery with a smart charger for startup and control.

    This is the one I am getting and wiring and manuals are in pdf downloads on this page:

    http://www.electricgeneratorsdirect.com/Generac-Guardian-6051-Standby-Generator/p6952.html
     
  14. sbl

    sbl Icon DBSTalk Club

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    I ran my 10KW Generac for a week (mostly at idle, as the power draw was low) and used about 100-125 gallons of LP.
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Well, the decision is now out of my hands. My wife wants the whole home genny and when she wants something...

    Rich
     
  16. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I'm looking at a month's running. Might as well prepare for the worst, even if it's never needed.

    Rich
     
  17. loudo

    loudo Well-Known Member

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    I would agree with her, especially after last winter, up here. I had my manual system, which I still have until the 14k whole house unit comes in next month, and I needed it three times. Every time it was as a result of snow or ice. All three times it was at night, so I had to go out and shovel the pad off, and try to set it up in the dark. Plus having to go out there and re-fuel it every few hours was a pain.
     
  18. Sixto

    Sixto Well-Known Member

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    Hi. Whether you go with whole home or not, it may be worth the time to totally understand your watt usage, by circuit breaker, by 120v leg, and in total, with averages and peaks.

    I went the inverter route, and I now have all the parts for the complete system, and just completed the energy analysis.

    Using the TED Gateway and the iPhone app, it was bothering me that the house was always hovering between 700-1000 watts, with a usual daily high about 2500ish, with today at 3,052 watts, week peak at 5,826 watts.

    I wanted to understand every watt and especially what was in the daily steady 700-1000 watts with no lights on, and just mapped it all out. It does take several hours, if not days, to figure it all out.

    I still have some work to do, to understand usage per 120v leg of the panel, but I'm finding this very important.

    And in my case the DirecTV equipment is not insignificant and a chunk of the steady state, and takes planning.
     
  19. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    My D* equipment is a load (pun intended) too. 12 HRs and 8 plasma TVs add up.

    Doesn't matter, the wife has spoken and there's no real argument I can think of against a whole home genny.

    About the wattage. I won't be able to get the genny installed for quite a while because it seems as if everyone in NJ is in the process of buying one. I'll probably wait until things calm down before I do any preliminary planning. I want to buy a genny that exceeds my normal wattage use in the summer by 20%. The 80% rule should hold true with a genny.

    Rich
     
  20. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Teays...
    Open your wallet. The 17 & 20kW Generacs are not meant for that. They are meant to be able to get you by for a few days to a week or two. Yes, they can run for several weeks, but that is not really what they are meant for.

    To do what you are suggesting, you probably need to start looking at a 45kW or higher and a 200a transfer switch. Your price points tripled.

    The 16 circuits we have (actually 15 as one is 240v) will get us by. We have A/C or heat (more heat than A/C because the heat is gas), the refrigerators, 2 TV's, hot water (also gas), alarm panel (smokes are integrated) and some lights. Would it be ideal to live this way for a month? No. But it sure beats the alternative.
     

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