Dish, Multiswitch & SWiM FAQ

Discussion in 'Tips & Resources Collaboration' started by carl6, Nov 23, 2011.

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  1. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Here is the first draft of the dish, multiswitch and SWiM FAQ. All feedback is appreciated.

    Carl
     
  2. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    A satellite has a quantity of transponders on it (or in the case of two of the satellites, a phased array
    panel that can perform like transponders). In simple terms, a transponder is an antenna that transmits
    a signal from the satellite to the earth.
    I see a mixing up of transponders and antennas here. More than one transponder may be connected to the antenna.
    I think it might be better [explained] by using transponders and antenna
    It is possible to send many different television programs over a
    single transponder at any given time. Some transponders aim their signals at the entire United
    States. Other transponders have what are called spot beams, and focus their signals on a limited
    geographic footprint (for example, a major city and some area surrounding it).




    SWiM Stack Plan. SWiM uses a different method of communicating between the receiver and the
    dish (or multiswitch), and uses a different method of sending channels from the dish/multiswitch to the
    receiver. There are 8 SWM channels plus a control channel.
    The guide channel #1 should be mentioned and its commonality for all receivers, leaving channels 2-9 for programing
    As we know the control is not displayed on the setup SWM screen

    The receivers tell the SWiM system
    what they want, and the SWiM puts the requested programming on one of the 8 SWiM channels and
    sends it to the receiver.

    Minor point: you have a nice image of the SATs, but it is blurry for the text.
     
  3. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Thanks VOS. I'll incorporate your suggestions on the text.

    As to the picture, I stole it off DBSTalk, so maybe someone here has the source for it, or a higher resolution copy.
     
  4. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Yeah, when I tried to reduce my images to be able to upload, they looked the same way.

    Not sure we even need to mention phased array and could simply refer to CONUS and stop beam antennas.
     
  5. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Draft revision b.
     
  6. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I've re-worked the SWiM Stack Plan:

    SWiM (both LNB and SWM8/16/32) uses a different method of communicating between the receiver and the dish (or multiswitch), and uses a different method of sending channels from the dish/multiswitch to the receiver. There are 9 SWM channels, plus the control/communication signal. The nine can be seen in the SAT signal level screens, like the SAT transponders. Channel 1 is the guide channel, which should always show, while #2 through #9 may display zeros, if these are currently being used by other tuners/receivers connected to this SWiM output. If all receivers on the same SWiM output are all on the signal level screens, there should be no zeros displayed on the SWM screen. As each receiver exits the setup menu, it will acquire one or two channels from the SWiM, which will be displayed as a zero on the other receivers still on the SWiM signal level screen.
    [/end]

    From what I've seen, the SWiM channels don't change by requests from the receivers, but instead get assigned 2, 3, 4 ,5, 6, 7, 8 ,9 as each receiver connects to the SWiM. With seven tuners, #9 is always been free.

    The control is more the "comm" signal as this can also be used between receivers on the same SWiM leg to share a phone connection to order PPV. IE: R22 doesn't have a phone line connected, but a HR20 does and is on the same SWiM, so the R22 asks the HR20 to call home through its phone line to order the PPV.
    Not sure we need to add this part, but the 2.3 MHz FSK signals does do this, so I think its more a communication signal than a control.
     
  7. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Some of your words, some of mine...
     
  8. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    [​IMG]
     
  9. Go Beavs

    Go Beavs Hall Of Fame

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    Wow, that's a lot of great information! Great work!

    Here's are my suggestions:

    1st page 1st paragraph:
    I think the proper term here is geostationary. Where's LL when you need him? :lol:
    FWIW, a couple of spanish HD channels come from 119, so not ALL HD comes from 99 and 103.
    I'd say, "No residential programming is currently beamed from 110."

    Second page below the 1st dish picture:

    Page 8, 1st paragraph, last sentence:
    Maybe something like: Again, a single SWiM coax connection can feed both tuners of a DVR.

    Page 9, end 1st paragraph:
    Page 10, at the start of the coax section:
    Suggested change to, "The final part of this FAQ is specifically about coax cables."

    Page 10, last paragraph:
     
  10. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Great comments, thanks.

    Also considering adding a troubleshooting section. Worth the effort?
     
  11. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The matrix might get overwhelming. ;)
     
  12. Scott Kocourek

    Scott Kocourek Well-Known Member

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    That's a hard one, the documents are good tools to point ot when helping one troubleshoot but people are too lazy to look up a FAQ that includes troubleshooting on their own.

    I think it's best left out.

    This looks great Carl, I'll look to see if I have any questions but I think you have it covered.
     
  13. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Here is one more revision, incorporating Go Beavs suggestions and adding a short troubleshooting section. Had already written it by the time you posted best to leave it out, and it is easily removed.
     
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