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Dish not grounded.

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by hankmack, Apr 27, 2007.

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  1. Apr 27, 2007 #1 of 100
    hankmack

    hankmack Legend

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    Hi. I had been having a problem with caller ID and in reading this forum I saw that some posters related the problem to a lake of grounding.
    I called customer service and they got my caller ID to work again by having me push the reset button. :) However the system is not grounded so I called back today and requested the installer come and ground the system. They will call back to set a date "in 24 hours". Am I being unreasonable? We do have occasional big electrical storms. Lightning struck a friends house which zapped every electrical appliance in the house.
     
  2. Apr 27, 2007 #2 of 100
    Annihilator31

    Annihilator31 Legend

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    Grounding your system won't make much of a difference. I'm an electrical engineer and the fact is, if your house gets hit by lightning, your just sol. Your only possible protection is a quality surge protector with Voltage, coax and phone inputs and outputs. Cable and satellite providers only ground their systems to cover their butt's. It does help, but not much. Fact is, sometimes grounding actually causes problems, I have seen it many times! After what I have seen, I refuse to ground my satellite system and use only an APC surge protection setup.
     
  3. Apr 27, 2007 #3 of 100
    585960

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    Grounding the system really doesn't do much, honestly. Its more for static electricity than anything else.
     
  4. Apr 27, 2007 #4 of 100
    hankmack

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    Thanks for the info. I do have surge protectors so I will not press the issue.
     
  5. Apr 27, 2007 #5 of 100
    PoitNarf

    PoitNarf New Member

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    Sorry guys, but I think grounding is extremely important whenever you have a large piece of metal outside as well as current going to and from it from your receivers and whatnot. The dish and all coax lines going from it should be grounded. Here is the thread in question, it can explain things much better than I can:

    http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?t=84943
     
  6. Apr 27, 2007 #6 of 100
    Coffey77

    Coffey77 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    There has been good discussion on this Poit, and I also believe it is not necessary to ground. If the OP can get it for free, then go right ahead. :) Otherwise, don't waste you time or money. CID has issues but so do people's phone lines. Many are old, spliced and re-spliced and are more likely the cause of CID failure than any grounding issue.
     
  7. Apr 27, 2007 #7 of 100
    rminsk

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    The National Electrical Code requires you ground your dish. See article 820-40 in the NEC.
     
  8. Apr 27, 2007 #8 of 100
    Tom Robertson

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    Is grounding required? If everything works right and doesn't suffer from floating ground problems that can result in things like: CID not working, channel changing issues, all the way up to burning out tuners then I guess in your situation it isn't necessary. But anyone who uses a UPS or cooling fan because they don't want to shorten the life of their hard drive but doesn't ground their system is putting premium gasoline in their engine but never replacing the oil or the tires.

    Is it necessary? No, but a very good, wise thing to do correctly.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  9. Apr 27, 2007 #9 of 100
    Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    For something that seem simple to do, getting it done correctly is very tough indeed.
     
  10. Apr 27, 2007 #10 of 100
    rminsk

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    Yes it is necessary because the NEC requires it.
     
  11. Apr 27, 2007 #11 of 100
    585960

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    Hmmm, no ground, no CID, or channels changing, receivers burning out? Please explain? This should be good. :hurah:
     
  12. Apr 27, 2007 #12 of 100
    hankmack

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    I don't see what harm it will do for me to have DTV ground the dish as per manual.
     
  13. Apr 27, 2007 #13 of 100
    Tom Robertson

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    Since you missed it the first time you read and then quoted my text, I'll just highlight the key phrase.

    Does no ground cause these problems in all cases? Of course not. But how many "Tuner #2 failed" and how many "I've got CID problems" would have been solved by a good ground? (And a more solid hardware design of the HR20...)

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  14. Apr 27, 2007 #14 of 100
    585960

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    Hey Tom, no I didn't miss it. But I hate to tell you, none of those problems have anything remotely to do with any sort or kind of grounding. Yeah we all know, NEC says its the law.
     
  15. Apr 27, 2007 #15 of 100
    PoitNarf

    PoitNarf New Member

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    And why not?
     
  16. Apr 27, 2007 #16 of 100
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I pick out the one I feel strongly about here....None.
    Poor assembly most likely is/was the cause of this one. :)
    There have been many posting where it came down to the unit as being defective & the "system" was never changed [for this one].
     
  17. Apr 27, 2007 #17 of 100
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    Ground your dish -- period!

    Those who would advise to the contrary are either misinformed or just plain stupid.
     
  18. Apr 27, 2007 #18 of 100
    dave1234

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    Whether grounding will help protect against a lightning strike may be debatable, but what's not is this: If lightning does strike and the installation is not done to code your insurance company doesn't have to pay to compensate for losses. Grounding is required by law in most all areas of this country.
     
  19. Apr 27, 2007 #19 of 100
    hasan

    hasan Well-Known Member

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    A safety ground is required by NEC. This provides little to no lightning protection, as a a safety ground has nothing to do with Radio Frequency and that is what lightning is RF (at least the most damaging part of it)

    Anyone who thinks a single ground rod connected to a dish with a small diameter wire provides ANY lightning protection is ...well....ill-informed. This very poor RF ground, but adequate safety ground will not help (and may, in fact hurt) in the case of a nearby strike. A direct hit is another matter entirely. Protection against a direct hit costs thousands of dollars.

    You can protect against nearby strikes with a LOT of effort and several hundred dollars of gas fired protectors on every coaxial line and every power line entering the house. These need to be bonded to a single point ground. This is NOT A TRIVIAL EXERCISE!

    So, do the safety ground, as required by the National Electrical Code, but don't entertain any illusions of protection from lightning....not gonna happen.

    Google Polyphasor.com if you want to learn about what it REALLY takes to get lightning protection.
     
  20. Apr 27, 2007 #20 of 100
    Tom Robertson

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    EE 101 (literally) floating ground is bad. So are ground loops. If you don't know that I sure hope you are not at all in the electrical or electronic realm for a profession.

    We have demonstrated proof that ground issues can be a cause of CID failure. So your argument is already lost on that issue. No, this is NOT the ONLY cause of CID failures, but no one is saying they are.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
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