Dish to deliver 1080p VOD

Discussion in 'DISH™ High Definition Discussion' started by MikeW, Jul 31, 2008.

  1. CoolGui

    CoolGui Icon

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    Good deal, this newer, better, faster (wat) VOD sounds good... so I'm guessing mine just hasn't downloaded I am Legend yet. I would probably rent a *lot* of these movies at the 2.99 price point, but not at 6.99. I have to wonder if it's Dish being greedy or is that what the studios are requiring them to charge? Oh also the new 24 hour limitation think is a real pain in the ass. Even so, if it was cheaper I'd just make sure to have the time to watch it that day I guess.
     
  2. kcushing

    kcushing New Member

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    I can't wait to try 1080p. When I first got my HD receiver, I set it to 1080i. The "I" is for "interlacing", which means that every other line is drawn, and on the next frame, the lines in between are filled in. So in each frame you are really getting half the 1080, or 540. "p" is for progressive which means it draws the whole thing in one frame. So 720p is really better than 1080i. In addition to this, any HD channel was produced with "p"(720 or 1080) and regular TV is produced with "i". The original TV picture tubes had to interlace, or you could see the screen flicker. In other words it couldn't draw progressive fast enough. Today we can draw 1080 progressively without visible flicker. The problem lies in that when you play something progressively that was produced with interlace, you can sometimes see a shift of the image on every other line. You can especially notice this when you pause a non-HD channel when your receiver is set to display progressively. But you still want to set your receiver to display progressive. Why? Because if you are watching HD sports or anything HD that moves quickly and your are sending interlacing frames to your HDTV you will see the frames. You will feel like you are watching a slide show rather than live sports. Your HDTV will get one frame of the interlacing, wait for the next frame that fills in the gaps, and then show the picture. So if you don't have the ability to show 1080p, don't use 1080i, use 720p!!!! 1080i is really just 540p at half speed!!!
     
  3. tcatdbs

    tcatdbs Icon

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    Kind of what I was thinking, although I do not notice any difference in 720p and 1080i on my 50" plasma. I think I'll switch mine back to 720p, since my TV is 768 (although is 1080i and 1080p compatable). I'll probably try anything in 1080p they sell for $2.99, but that's about it.

    Can these be recordered and stored on an extermal drive? That might make them worth $4.99 or $5.99.
     
  4. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    VODs cannot be copied. You might be able to dub them in standard def (AV cables to DVD burner/capture card) but they are intended to be one night rentals - returned to the "store" or deleted by the machine in 24 hours.
     
  5. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    There is just so much wrong with this post that I don't even know where to begin. I keep thinking we are past people not knowing what interlaced and progressive is and the difference between that and the actual resolution of the image itself... but stuff like this keeps popping up with the same-old completely wrong information.

    In short...

    1. 1080i does NOT in any way shape or form "=" 540p.
    2. 720p is NOT higher resolution than 1080i.

    For more in-depth analysis of why your post is wrong, I encourage you to search the forums here for discussions OR visit AVS Forums and search there OR actually search online (or at a library) for technical specifications and implications of how broadcast TV actually works.
     
  6. Bichon

    Bichon Godfather

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    Wrong. 1080i has more information. Every 1/30 of a second, the 1080i signal sends two 540 line fields comprising a 1920x1080 pixel frame. In the same 1/30 of a second, the 720p signal sends a single 1080x720 pixel frame.

    Nope, with the exception of a handful of broadcasters (like ABC and ESPN) that send 720p signals, the vast majority of broadcasters send interlaced 1080i, 480i, or analog 525 line interlaced. Since your fixed panel display (LCD, plasma, DLP) can only show a progressive signal, that means something is going to have to do the de-interlacing. If you set your satellite receiver to 720p, it's the satellite receiver doing the de-interlacing. If you set it to 1080i, it's the TV that's doing the de-interlacing. In many cases, the TV does a better job.

    I'll also point out that all films and most HD content is shot at 24 frames per second. When processing such content, a decent de-interlacer will recognize the 3:2 cadence used by the telecine process, insure that the even and odd fields are pulled from the same original frame, completely eliminating those pesky de-interlacing artifacts.
     
  7. paja

    paja Godfather

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    James, help me a bit. I have a 622 (I have the everything aavailable and hd package) but I'm not getting channel 501. Why not??
     
  8. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Have you read here only 722 with L6.10 connected to 1080p TV after Aug 9 will see the movie ?
     
  9. CoolGui

    CoolGui Icon

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    I must have missed that Aug. 9 date... I thought it was starting August 1st for some reason. I'll keep an eye out after the 9th then.
     
  10. Jim5506

    Jim5506 Hall Of Fame

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    One small correction: Every 1/30 of a second 720p sends two 1280X720 pixel frames. 720p sends 1 full frame every 1/60 of a second.

    Pixels per frame:

    720p60 - 1280X720=921,600 pixels in 1/60 of a second.

    720p60 - 1280X720X2=1,843,200 pixels in 1/30 of a second (two frames).

    1080i30 - 1920X1080=2,073,600 pixels in 1/30 of a second.

    1080i has about 12% more information than 720p.
     
  11. swissy

    swissy AllStar

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    A small point, but if kcushing's plasma has a fixed resolution of 768 and it can accept 1080p, then his internal scaler probably upconverts all signals to 1080p before changing them to 1366x768 (50" plasma). This is how Panasonic does it so it could be different for other brands, but it is pretty common none the less.

    So if everything is first scaled to 1080p, that is the best native resolution to send the display. Then if you decide to send it something other than native 1080p or an upconverted signal, you have to decide which component has the better de-interlacer and scaler.

    I hope this isn't too OT.
     
  12. Deke Rivers

    Deke Rivers Legend

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    ok are the 622's getting this update as well?
     
  13. johnsbin

    johnsbin AllStar

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    Yes - the updates should be out be end of next week, so I hear.
     
  14. johnsbin

    johnsbin AllStar

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    There is a very popular Youtube video where some guy tells everyone that 720p is a higher resolution than 1080i and goes through the whole bizarre "540p" garbage.

    Today's source for authoritative information - wikipedia and youtube.

    Simply amazing...
     
  15. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    I have the release and the movie is a choice on 501. I do not have 1080p nor an HDMI connection. So it's there, just doesn't do me any good as a 1080p.
     
  16. Taco Lover

    Taco Lover Icon

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    Heh, I have the release and the movie is not a choice on 501. I do have 1080p and an HDMI connection. So it's not there, and that doesn't do me any good.

    :lol:
     
  17. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Good thing you have a sense of humor. They'll probably download it to you tonight. Right?:D
     
  18. kcushing

    kcushing New Member

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    This may be true. I reallize I wasn't at all takeing at all into consideration the horizontal resolution. But all I know is I can't watch sports in 1080i because of all of the stop motion. I have to step down to 720p so that as the camera scans the field, it does so smoothly. My set is capable of 1080p
     
  19. kcushing

    kcushing New Member

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    My receiver's screen-saver shows that I have been upgraded, but my setup still can only go up to 1080i. So what did the upgrade do??

    I guess I still have to stick with 720p. 30 frames per second just isn't fast enough for quick action like sports. You may get more resolution with 1080i, but you miss too much between the frames. I would rather have twice the frames per second and have quick action look smooth. You get higher resolution with 1080i, although not as much as you think when you measure it in pixels per second. 1920 x 1080i x 30 fps = 62,208,000 pps and 1280 x 720p x 60 fps = 55,296,000 pps. So there is still more resolution even in pixels per second, but not much more. And if you don't consider the horizontal resolution, you get 1080i x 30 = 32,400 lines per second which is not nearly as good as 720p x 60 = 43,200 lines per second. Maybe that's not a fair comparison considering most HD resolution is in the width. But getting 60 frames per second instead of 30 frames can mean the difference of being able to tell that a fast ball made it by the hitter, or that a soccer ball missed and bounced into the back of the net from behind rather than from the front. I will only choose the highest resolution that gives me at least 60 frames per second.
     
  20. Jeff_DML

    Jeff_DML Legend

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    problem is most HD channels are 1080i not 720p(I think FOX,ESPN,ABC). If you set your 622/722 to 720p on a 1080i channels now you are getting the same 30fpg with added benefit of less resolution.
     

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