Disney's Deal With Dish Network Reveals Why Cable Companies Are Terrified Of Online Streaming Servic

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by Athlon646464, Sep 29, 2014.

  1. tampa8

    tampa8 Godfather/Supporter

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    No comparison. Netflix does not offer what traditional Cable/Satellite does, so of course they have not gone up as much. Sports alone make up a large portion of costs, and I can't watch my teams on Netflix, or Sportscenter, etc....
    And my Internet bill has risen $14 over the last year and half, which means if I depend soley on Netflix, by proxy Netflix has gone up that additional $14. Streaming may or may not become the main way we watch programming, but it will be at a much higher cost than people seem to think.
     
  2. tampa8

    tampa8 Godfather/Supporter

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    Certainly not the experience of almost everyone else. In Eastern Ct just over the last two winters alone we would have lost Cable TV if we had it, and did lose the internet several times, and for more than two weeks at a time. Those are widespread, not just me, not just my town. In Florida where I also live we lose it less often, but have lost it for short periods of time many times - car into pole, strong winds, etc...

    With my generator as needed I had DISH with no loss. I have Satellite TV actually (Almost since the begining of DISH) partly because cable goes out often.
     
  3. Rduce

    Rduce Legend

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    I have Charter Internet and phone for the last two years and the only time I have had an outage is when because of a wind storm my power was out. Both times right around 20 hour both time. However, once the power was back on, phone and Internet was up and running like normal. In this area, because phone is offered, it is the contract with the community, Charter MUST be up and running. So they have crews working 24/7 and if there is a power outage their equipment has battery backup and it the outage is going to be longer than the batteries will die, you have them showing up with generators and chaining them to poles and tress to keep the service up and running. So I can say I NEVER have had any cable outage that I am aware of. My friend who has television service has never said it was out when he went to watch something, so apparently in this area is out of the norm? I can't believe that, but in most areas the cables are underground.
     
  4. strongjoe

    strongjoe New Member

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    Video streaming is indeed the future, but pay tv can't be over powered by streaming, both will grow in revenue and customer base and it will be a strong. Competition between pay tv and streaming on content value, and customer needs,
     
  5. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Yada Yada Yada DBSTalk Gold Club

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  6. Wilf

    Wilf Legend

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  7. tampa8

    tampa8 Godfather/Supporter

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    And they are expected to raise rates in February for regular subscribers. None of these increases should be of any surprise, they are paying a kings ransom to have internet providers "allow" them to stream at full rates. This is just the begining. I'm not knocking Netflix or any of the online providers, they are overall a decent service. But reality is there are too many forces that will be sure to get their share, making Netflix and others needing to charge more and more. Gee, sounds like what Cable and Satellite have to do....
     
  8. jsk

    jsk Icon

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    I believe that after a certain percentage of people cut the cord, the networks will slowly realize that they are screwing themselves and lower prices. The question is will they realize it in time to save the cable/sat TV model?

    The cable/sat. model is much more efficient than streaming because they only have to send popular shows over their limited bandwidth once. The streaming model means that they have to send a copy of the program over their bandwidth for each and every person who downloads it. Much of it taking up their Internet bandwidth. Cable companies will have to pay to keep upgrading their infrastructure to adapt to this less efficient model.
     
  9. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    You don't need bigger to benefit from 4K. In fact, if you don't mind sitting close to the set, 40" would be a great size for a 4K set. Others will disagree vehemently, but it's a matter of personal taste.
     
  10. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    This is actually a really good point. For Dish to add a new customer they just go install equipment. There is no bandwidth "penalty" for adding another user to the system. Cable is a mixed bag because they do true on-demand, so that part can get into a bandwidth crunch as they add more customers IF a lot of customers in a given area decided to watch on demand at the same time.

    But streaming, like Netflix... each new customer added is additional strain on their bandwidth.. It's one thing to talk about the ISP I have and my ability to download high-quality streaming... but in order to serve millions of ME all over the country Netflix has to constantly be upgrading as they add big chunks of customers.

    To some degree Netflix is in that growing company mode where it is running close and willing to lose a little money to get customers for the long haul... eventually the piper will have to be paid.
     
  11. sregener

    sregener Godfather

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    The broadcast model works beautifully for live events. And DVRs have expanded the definition of a live event to include highly popular programming that a large number of people want to watch, even if it is time-shifted. But as the popularity of the programming drops, the broadcast model becomes more and more inefficient. 10 people in a metropolitan area watching a channel does not justify the bandwidth cost of sending it to 1 million. Broadcasting movies via cable almost never makes sense.

    I can see niche channels moving to a streaming-only model, such that the number of "real" channels drops dramatically.

    Oddly enough, my "cable" company is my local telephone company, which provides voice, data and television over fiber. They don't broadcast anything, but actually just "stream" the channels I'm watching on a point-to-point system. And I hate to say this in a satellite forum, but their picture quality puts Dish and DirecTV to shame. Every channel is as good as OTA HD can get. I'm very sensitive to macroblocking and color squashing, and the pictures I'm seeing on ESPN are jawdroppingly beautiful. It reminds me of my early days with DirecTV, when they delivered the best NTSC could offer.
     
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  12. Paul Secic

    Paul Secic Hall Of Fame

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    I don't care abut 4k, 3D...
     
  13. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Have you done a true side by side realtime comparison? I haven't been able to for a couple of years, but when I did, DIRECTV's picture was no worse and no better than the SF bay area's OTA.

    Recently a lot of sports broadcasting has been bit starved, be it 720 or 1080.
     
  14. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    I've done a side by side comparison with our cable HD vs Directv, and I agree , directv isn't as good.
    And I only get cables HD that off the Coax, not their cable boxes.

    Until later today that is .
     
  15. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    I am well aware of your local conditions.

    I was asking sregener.
     
  16. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    At that extreme I agree. But there comes a level of viewership where broadcasting is more efficient ... send once to everyone and let their home DVR systems do the recording and buffering for later viewing.

    There content that people want to see live ... event programming such as sports and major shows that one has to see live or live in a bubble to avoid spoilers. Even if the viewer records the program and watches later in the evening, delivery to their home at the moment the content is available is desired.

    There will always be a market for live streamed content ... broadcasting is the best way to serve that market.
     
  17. sregener

    sregener Godfather

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    No, I haven't done a true side-by-side. I'm basing my conclusions on memory and very sensitive eyes.

    Although it is possible that DirecTV's picture quality has improved since 2012, I'm not willing to sign a 2-year contract to saddle myself to another DVR that doesn't respond to button presses for 30 seconds and frequently made me want to smash my remote in frustration.
     
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  18. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    It has not improved. I can tell you that much .
    Since I have H21 and a Roamio currently hooked up to the same tv.
    And directv HD PQ is definitely not as good.
     
  19. acostapimps

    acostapimps Hall Of Famer

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    Some channels might look worse than others whether it's national cable channels,RSN's or locals
    For me is always premiums for some reason, when they have free trials as I never order those
    Or our local Fox when they show football games either college or pros, but everything else looks fine
    Also some soccer games looks bit starved especially on locals Univision or UniMas, but looks better on Univision Deportes or beIN.
     
  20. lee635

    lee635 Hall Of Fame

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    I don't see this as much of a competitive advantage for satellite. There are technical fixes that can overcome this weakness for streaming. For example, servers can be placed in large cities to hold the entire netflix cache, or at least to cache more popular selections. Then, the stream travels a shorter path over the network. For live streaming, IP multicasting can reduce redundant streams as well. HBO just announced a standalone streaming option coming out next year. Once sports start getting routinely IP streamed live, cable/satellite's competitive advantage will erode further. Of course, there will always be the bandwidth starved areas of the country, but cities (which is where most people live) are getting more bandwidth and more broadband options. And cable and satellite will continue just as plain old telephone service continues to exist, but subscriber counts have definately peaked.
     

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