Do we really need 4K ready AVRs for our 4K sets?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Audio' started by Rich, Jan 6, 2016.

  1. Jan 6, 2016 #1 of 61
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    33,009
    1,227
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    I just checked the price of the Sony STR-DN1060 and it's up to $599 at both Crutchfield and Amazon. I've been waiting for the prices on these to drop and they've gone up instead. At the moment, I don't need a new AVR to play what little 4K content there is available, I can use my old AVRs. I use optical wires for audio and that works fine. Yeah, using the AVR would make things a bit easier when switching inputs, but I think I can live with my Sony STR-DN1010 until the prices are more reasonable. I don't think $600 is worth spending when there's nothing wrong with my 1010. I'm gonna stick with the Sony AVR because I know how they work and I've had no problems with them over the years, but $600? That's a bit too much for a Sony AVR, I think.

    Rich
     
  2. Jan 6, 2016 #2 of 61
    Christopher Gould

    Christopher Gould Icon

    1,027
    18
    Jan 14, 2007
    I have been surviving for a year with my non 4k or 3d avr. A 4k avr would be nice like you for switching and a few less cables behind the entertainment center but until the $$$ is available I'll still be using a non 4k avr
     
  3. Jan 7, 2016 #3 of 61
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    33,009
    1,227
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Yup, turns out you really don't need a 4K ready AVR, thought I'd just pass that along to folks that might not be aware. I'm using a Samsung home entertainment system, came with speakers and has a BD player built in. Cheap unit, but really good sound. Surprised me. My wife was adamant about not putting another "home shaking" sound system in the MB. I don't even have the subwoofer hooked up and it still shakes the house if I turn the sound up. Good quality audio when the volume is low. Really good front speaker, too. Never expected such quality from it.

    Rich.
     
  4. Jan 7, 2016 #4 of 61
    WestDC

    WestDC Well-Known Member

    3,291
    271
    Feb 9, 2008
  5. Jan 7, 2016 #5 of 61
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    33,009
    1,227
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    That receiver is not HDCP compliant. But you can get it for $319 at Crutchfield.

    Rich
     
  6. Jan 7, 2016 #6 of 61
    WestDC

    WestDC Well-Known Member

    3,291
    271
    Feb 9, 2008
    I know that but (they) Crutchfield list's it as a 4k receiver and I bought it early 2015 for $450 new from them :)

    Upcoming in july 2016 the new sony's avr's will be out and the 1060 will be last years junk :) Maybe a 1070 if keeping with the last offerings I use a 1040 (bought in 2013) in another room (it's not 4k either) but works as designed for me now.
     
  7. Jan 7, 2016 #7 of 61
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    33,009
    1,227
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    That's just what I'm waiting for.

    Rich
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

    3,856
    39
    Nov 2, 2006
    Phoenix,...
    My Yamaha does 4K pass through. It's a HTIB.
     
  9. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

    3,856
    39
    Nov 2, 2006
    Phoenix,...
    My Yamaha does 4K pass through. It's a HTIB.
     
  10. Beerstalker

    Beerstalker Hall Of Fame

    3,575
    76
    Feb 9, 2009
    Peoria, IL
    If you want the newer audio codecs like Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HDMA etc then you have to use HDMI for audio. If your devices that output 4K only have one HDMI output, then yes you will have to upgrade to a newer AVR that has HDMI 2.0/HDCP 2.2 compatible inputs/outputs. Or you can get source devices with multiple HDMI outputs (these can be found on some blu-ray players, but for DirecTV etc you are out of luck). I did this for a while when I bought my Panasonic 65VT60. I didn't want to upgrade my AVR at that time (Denon 3808) so I bought a newer Panasonic 3D blu-ray player that had 2 HDMI ouptuts. I ran one output to the AVR for sound, and one straight to the TV for picture so I could watch 3D blu-rays.

    If you don't care about the newer audio codecs then you can just go HDMI straight to the TV and optical/digital coaxial to the AVR and just use old school Dolby Digital/DTS. So you have to switch inputs on the TV and the AVR. With a programmable remote like a Logitech Harmony it isn't that big of a deal.
     
  11. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

    5,053
    72
    Mar 22, 2004
    Indian...
  12. Gloria_Chavez

    Gloria_Chavez Godfather

    562
    33
    Aug 11, 2008
    nytimes on 4k...

    point? If you buy a 4k set, make sure it has high dynamic range.

    **********************
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/07/technology/personaltech/ces-4k-television.html?_r=0

    Still, even with more 4K content coming, the higher resolution may not be worth it. In my tests, I compared Samsung’s flagship 4K television, the JS9500, which costs $4,500, side by side with my three-year-old Panasonic 1080p plasma TV. On the 4K version of “Jerry Maguire,” I could see some details that were lost in the 1080p version, such as Cuba Gooding Jr.’s pores, along with some details in the shadows of his face and horizontal lines on a television screen showing a football game. In other words, not breathtaking.

    More profound differences could be seen in newer content that was produced with 4K in mind, like Amazon’s TV series “Mozart in the Jungle.” The colors in that show looked especially vibrant and vivid, and the picture was noticeably clearer in 4K than in 1080p. Amazon declined to make an executive available for comment on its 4K offerings.

    What makes “Mozart in the Jungle” look exceptional is a new color technology called H.D.R., or high dynamic range. This software feature enhances the contrast and color profile of a picture. In bright colors, you will see brighter highlights; in dark colors, you will see more details. In my side-by-side comparisons, 4K content with high dynamic range was noticeably superior to 1080p content, whereas 4K content without high dynamic range had a negligible difference in picture quality compared with 1080p.
    **********************
     
  13. Beerstalker

    Beerstalker Hall Of Fame

    3,575
    76
    Feb 9, 2009
    Peoria, IL
    What you really want is an Ultra HD Premium certified device, now that they finally decided to establish an actual standard. Although I'm sure there is nothing stopping them from coming out with Ultra HD Premium 2.0 or Ultra HD Platinum in a couple months (assuming they don't just jump up to 8K Hyper HD or whatever they end up calling it).

    http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/games/uhda/twentieth-century-fox/Warner_Bros./Samsung/launch-date/hdr/LG/Dolby_Atmos/dtsx/4K/Ultra_HD/ultra-hd-premium-is-revealed-as-the-fullfeatured-uhd-standard-which-includes-the-uhd-blurays-that-will-launch-this-spring/28690
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    33,009
    1,227
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    That's interesting. I have two Samsung BD player/upscalers and both have dual HDMI out ports. When I move the new 4K set to our prime viewing room I think I'll give that a try and see how it works with my Sony AVR. The upscaling BD players are the only source of 2160p I have at the moment. Lot of discussion going on about the audio problems that the Sammy 4Ks have with streaming boxes. I don't see those problems with my upscalers. So far, I've had two Roku 4s that would only put out stereo when hooked up to the 4K set and others have tried the newer Fire TVs and they have the same audio problems.

    Rich
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    33,009
    1,227
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Ohh, Charlie...I had one Yamaha sound system and it really was bad. Kinda soured me on Yamahas.

    Rich
     
  16. Beerstalker

    Beerstalker Hall Of Fame

    3,575
    76
    Feb 9, 2009
    Peoria, IL
    Yep, that's the whole reason for dual HDMI outputs. They usually even have writing near them saying which one is for video/sound and which one is sound only.

    As far as the Roku/FireTV audio issues, I'm betting that's the same problem that has been around for quite a while. People are trying to put HDMI from those boxes to the TV and then have optical out (or HDMI ARC) from the TV to their AVR/sound bar. Doing that is only going to get your stereo sound for the vast majority of TVs because they can't take the advanced audio formats from HDMI and send them back out from the TV to the AVR/soundbar.
     
    1 person likes this.
  17. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

    6,774
    111
    Apr 22, 2002
    Kansas City KS
    I looked at that - I LIKE ! - I've have also been a Yamaha Bigot , unfortuantely - can't do anything about it right now.
     
  18. adamson

    adamson Godfather

    593
    19
    Nov 9, 2007
    Houston, TX
    The Denon AVR S710W or AVR S910W deserve a good look from anyone! DTS:X will be coming to them also before summer. Internal receiver "dead" display issue from previous model AVR S700W has been fixed. Be sure to buy from an authorized dealer for warranty reasons. ABT is a good start and factory fresh.
     
  19. mutelight

    mutelight Godfather

    388
    17
    Oct 6, 2008
    People don't necessarily need them of course but they are ni

    This is what I did for some time.

    You don't need a 4K AVR in most cases but it does help simplify the system and as you mention, allow you to take advantage of lossless audio codecs. (Which isn't applicable to DTV at the moment.)

    In one of my rooms I upgraded my AVR for 4K because I have a Sony 4K player, Nvidia Shield, and C61K so being able to take advantage of the HDCP 2.2 ports is nice.

    In the main room I have another Shield which I run through my Emotiva preamp which supports 4K but not HDCP 2.2 but still passes 4K YouTube. Then I have my 4K Blu-ray player and DirecTV wired directly to the TV via two 15ft HDMI runs since they require HDCP 2.2. Emotiva is going to offer an upgrade HDMI board for HDCP 2.2 but it is only going to add one port, which is a bummer because I have at least two sources I would like to run.

    This weekend I may spend a little more time tuning my Harmony Elite because when switching inputs on my TV, it can be a little wonky with the macros which I would like all the source changes to be in the preamp
     
  20. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    33,009
    1,227
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Does the Nvidia Shield upscale all content to 2160p? I haven't been able to find this out and I've been trying for months. Does it do the same things the Roku 4 does as far as upscaling goes?

    Rich
     

Share This Page

spam firewall