do you keep your HD receiver set at 720p or 1080i??

Discussion in 'DISH™ High Definition Discussion' started by 0pusX, Apr 18, 2008.

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  1. 0pusX

    0pusX Legend

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    Jan 10, 2008
    Im just using a 42" Insignia LCD, but I dont really notice any difference with my 622.

    I usually keep it at 1080i, would i benefit more by switching to 720p?
     
  2. space86

    space86 Icon

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    May 4, 2007
    720p has more pixels better picture.
     
  3. 0pusX

    0pusX Legend

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    Jan 10, 2008
    well i will switch it then to see if its better. thanks!!
     
  4. allargon

    allargon Legend

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    May 2, 2007
    1280x720=921600 pixels
    1920x1080=2073600 pixels

    1080i has as many pixels as 1080p. This is not the Best Buy showroom floor. I'm not picking on you. I just want this misinformation nipped in the bud.

    I've found my 768p display looks slightly better with my 211 set to display at 1080i despite the fact that my 768p display has de-interlacing issues. I don't have any test patterns, but I wonder if the Dish receiver has them as well. I've noticed some nasty shimmering and aliasing artifacts when I set output to 720p with 1080i native sources (e.g., "Ultra Space" on UltraHD).
     
  5. Taco Lover

    Taco Lover Icon

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    Jan 8, 2007
    Yeah, but since 1080i is interlaced, only half the vertical pixels are visible at once. Of course, your eye can't really tell.

    I have mine set at 1080i. I can't tell the difference between it and 720p on my 55" 1080p Sony SXRD.
     
  6. wje

    wje Godfather

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    Mar 8, 2006
    New England
    Er, no
    720P is 720 horizontal scan lines with 1280 pixels per line.
    1080i is 1080 horizontal scan lines with 1920 pixels per line.

    The primary difference is that 1080i is transmitted one half-frame at a time, whereas 720p transmits the entire frame each time. Typically, 720P is better for sports or other fast-action video, since you don't get interlacing artifacts. 1080i is better for slow-moving video.

    Minor nuance - even though you would think 1080i would have significantly better vertical resolution, it doesn't always. 1080i is sometimes vertically blurred to reduce some interlacing artifacts.

    However, since the satellite and cable providers usually over-compress the video feeds (HD-lite), you typically can't tell much difference between the two. If you really want to see the difference, compare two OTA stations that are transmitting full-bandwidth video. (PBS is usually good for 1080i, as long at it's a program that was shot with 1080 equipment; a lot of HD used to be shot with 720 cameras. It's noticeable on my 60" Pio.
     
  7. Slipshod

    Slipshod Cool Member

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    Oct 30, 2006
    I actually found 720p noticably better for SD content, and couldn't tell a significant difference between the HD resolutions, so I left it at 720p all the time.

    I don't have to choose an output anymore though. I've got native passthrough now thanks to the R5000 and SageTV with their HD Extender. :D

    Cheers,
    Slipshod
     
  8. rbyers

    rbyers Godfather

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    Jan 14, 2004
    I use 720p to drive my 720p set. The picture usually looks pretty much the same when viewing active content. I used the HDNet test pattern, which is on about 2AM Tuesday or Wednesday. When viewing the test pattern, I could see minor artifacts on 1080 that disappeared after switching to 720.
     
  9. wje

    wje Godfather

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    Mar 8, 2006
    New England
    All of this is far from simple. It depends upon many factors, starting with the studio end. The part we have control over is deciding which device does the best scaling when resolutions don't match, the dvr, or the receiver. As always, try it out and pick what you like. Some people have high-end receivers that have fantastic scalers. Some people don't. Unfortunately, the 622/722 doesn't have native passthrough, so you only get your choice half the time. :)
     
  10. HobbyTalk

    HobbyTalk Hall Of Fame

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    Jul 14, 2007
    I use 1080i on my 768p set. It is claimed that my model of Panny downconverts 1080i better then it would upconvert 720p. I personally haven't noticed any difference.
     
  11. Presence

    Presence Godfather

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    Mar 14, 2004
    This might be getting outside the realm of this discussion, but is there such a thing as interlaced video on an LCD flat panel? I thought LCDs were progressive by nature. (Not sure about plasmas.)
     
  12. DJ Lon

    DJ Lon Legend

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    Nov 3, 2005
    Phoenix, AZ
    Is this listed in the program guide on its own or is it attached to the end of another program?
     
  13. DJ Lon

    DJ Lon Legend

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    Nov 3, 2005
    Phoenix, AZ
    That's what I found out when I researched my set. If I keep my TV @ 720p it's supposed to be the most natural display resolution and if I choose 1080i the TV chip has to do extra duty to deinterlace the picture.
     
  14. lukin4u

    lukin4u AllStar

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    Apr 13, 2007
    of heard of this test pattern before but have never found it,
    and no it is not in the guide when i looked a month ago

    anybody got any exact info for the test?
     
  15. mhowie

    mhowie Legend

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    Sep 30, 2006
    Claimed by whom? I am in the same situation as you (Panny set, 768p) and find myself switching between 720p and 1080i on my Dish 722 depending on the source (e.g., ESPN- 720, CBS- 1080). If I would be better served leaving the receiver in the 1080i output mode 100% of the time with this set, I would like to know.

    Thanks,
     
  16. hdaddikt

    hdaddikt Legend

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    Jul 2, 2005
    This discussion has come up numerous times and each time it gets over-analyzed IMO. Set it for what looks best for you. For me the 1080i setting on my 622 looks better on my 768p display. I have tried switching it to 720p on occasion depending on the programming, and never saw an improvement. Of course there is always the first time, but unless I see a noticeable degradation in the picture, I'm not likely to waste time switching back and forth. YMMV
     
  17. HobbyTalk

    HobbyTalk Hall Of Fame

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    It was over on the AVS Forum under the model of my set. A Panny engineer posted a note that the way Panny works it upconverts the 720 signal to 1080 before it downcoverts it to 768. By setting the source to 1080 you bypass this step.

    Of course the Panny could have a better scaler then the 622/722 but I haven't notice this in practice.
     
  18. kbuente

    kbuente Legend

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    Mar 25, 2007
    It's not a choice but wouldn't the BEST choice be 1080P?
     
  19. CoolGui

    CoolGui Icon

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    Feb 8, 2006
    Sure it would be... You'd get the higher resolution and also non-interlaced (but a lower framerate by current supported standards -- not sure if you'd notice). However, none of the networks or providers broadcast at 1080p, nor do many displays.....
     
  20. FastNOC

    FastNOC Godfather

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    Sep 11, 2007
    Yeah I originally had 1080i on my Mitsu 65 inch but IMO 720p is better because it doesn't have the blurring issues on high action scenes.

    But since nobody transmits 1080p the only thing you can use with it is blu-ray
     
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