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Downloading Video on Demand

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Cactus, May 30, 2009.

  1. Cactus

    Cactus Cool Member

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    May 22, 2009
    Am I missing something here?? Or does it just take a long time to download a on demand content?

    Kind of sucks, finding something you want to watch and having to wait to get it.

    Downloaded a movie 1hr 27min moive and it took like 3 hours to do.

    Have the hr23-700 with the wall jacks connecting the box to my router.

    Should I assume this is normal? I figure just download stuff the night before for the following day.
     
  2. LarryFlowers

    LarryFlowers New Member

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    Sep 22, 2006
    Since the download is routed through your internet connection it would be helpful to know what your internet speed is? Anything less than 6mb is going to made DoD pretty slow.

    Larry

     
  3. Cactus

    Cactus Cool Member

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    May 22, 2009
    I am a tech newbie.
    How would I find that out?
    I have roadrunner light service for the internet.
    Would it be on the modem?
     
  4. Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

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    Dec 8, 2006
  5. Cactus

    Cactus Cool Member

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    May 22, 2009
    It goes to download at 0.74???
    Then says user error??
     
  6. Cactus

    Cactus Cool Member

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    May 22, 2009
    My bad it says upload test error.
    Could it be that slow?
    Thanks for your help. Never got into too much tech stuff at all, and found this forum so it intersts me some.
     
  7. LarryFlowers

    LarryFlowers New Member

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    Sep 22, 2006
    Roadrunner Lite is a 768KB downstream service and unfortunately will provide you with a very poor DoD experience. Video files are quite large... many gigabytes... and any connection less than 3MB is going to provide an extremely slow download speed.

    Larry
     
  8. MountainMan10

    MountainMan10 Icon

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    Jan 30, 2008
    0.74 is pretty normal for an upload speed. It is the download speed that matters for DOD.
    I find that DOD is limited to about 6 or 7 mb download for HD which downloads a 30 minute show in about 35 to 40 minutes. For SD you need about 2-3mb download speed for real time.
     
  9. Movieman

    Movieman Hall Of Fame

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    May 8, 2009
    Also keep in mind that you dont have to wait for the whole movie to download to begin watching it. You can begin watching after a certain percentage is ready. I think if it turns green or something like that.
     
  10. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Piscataway, NJ
    My Cablevision modem runs at 6.86 download and 2.02 upload. Huh. Just ran a second test and the 2.02 up remains the same, but the download speed increased to 7.35. And the results show that it should download an 800MB movie in 15 minutes. Must be SD, no?

    I've only downloaded one 1080p movie (Australia) and it didn't seem to take an inordinate amount of time to download.

    Rich
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    For those of us that are "technologically challenged" that speed test is the kind of thing we need. Got any more goodies? And could you explain (gently, remember who you're dealing with here) why I got those different download readings in the space of a couple minutes?

    More goodies, please!

    Rich
     
  12. LarryFlowers

    LarryFlowers New Member

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    Sep 22, 2006
    Upload and download speeds can very quite a bit over the course of the day and is dependent on the load the system is carrying. This is particularly evident on the cable internet connections.

    When you have cable internet you need to think of your home as a "cubicle" in the office.... your neighborhood "the office" is sharing an internet connection and the more people who are online at the same time, your speed will be affected.

    Also remember the speed you see is not 6 MEGABYTES/sec... it is 6 MEGABITS per second, which equals .786 megabytes... and we measure files in megabytes and gigabytes. So a 6 Mbps (MEGABITS per second) internet connection is not even downloading 1 megabyte per second.

    A Roadrunner Lite connection of 768 KILOBITS per second has a download speed of one tenth of a megabyte per second (.10 MB).

    Larry


     
  13. -Draino-

    -Draino- Godfather

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    May 18, 2008
    New Hampshire
    I have Comcast (Unfortunetly) but there is no competition in Manchester, NH. The good thing about them though is that downloads are fast. I can get a 2 hour movie in about 40 minutes. My download/upload speed can be seen at http://www.earthuser.com
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Piscataway, NJ
    I've heard a couple of analogies similar to yours. I did kinda understand that on weekends and at night the speed of access would slow down due to the number of people using it. I do know that I have Cablevision's fastest modem as of a year or so ago. I gotta give them a call and see if they've got something faster, but this one seems pretty fast.

    Did you see the download speed on the post above yours? 29.55Mbps? On a cable modem? Is that possible? Am I reading that wrong? That's almost six times faster than mine.

    Thanx. First time I've seen an explanation of Mbps that clear. I've noted several times that on HDDs the Transfer Rate (I think) is measured in Mbps. Always wondered about that. Too lazy to look it up. Now I shall ponder this for awhile...ah, 1 Mbps = 0.125 MBps, or one eighth of a Megabyte per second. Is there a standard for HD movies such as 1 hour = X?

    Rich
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    You're using a cable modem that is almost six times faster than mine? How can that be? I've never delved into this megabit stuff and I'm pretty confused. Not that I don't believe you, it just doesn't seem possible. Comcast is that much better than Cablevision?

    Rich
     
  16. Cactus

    Cactus Cool Member

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    May 22, 2009
    Thank you all.

    After lookinginot the speed or Roadrunner. I will need to upgrade to enjoy it DOD more.
    Thnaks again for all the info.
     
  17. Sartori

    Sartori Legend

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    Nov 15, 2008
    Are you kidding me, your complaining about it taking 3 hours?? Man nobody's ever happy...
     
  18. LarryFlowers

    LarryFlowers New Member

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    Cable modems can easily be that fast... with a couple of caveats.

    You have a pipe coming into your neighborhood or "zone" of a fixed size that is pretty large, but it is divided up among all the users in that neighborhood. It is easy for the cable provider to say you will get 6Mbps and they will virtually always deliver it. They monitor these connections and when they reach a certain saturation point and speeds begin to fall, they (supposedly) add bandwidth.

    If you are in a neighborhood with few users your speeds go up pretty quickly.

    Comcast also uses something called "Speed Boost" that can easily double a users speed IF there is excess network capacity at the time the user is on.

    When my Comcast Cable installer came to hook up my internet he asked me what speed I had purchased. I had bought the less expensive 6Mbps connection. He said good and that I was in for a surprise.

    I was. Apparently there are only a few users on my connection. I routinely am getting 28Mbps and a slow day would be considered 19Mbps.

    Something else about megabytes and megabits. The designation tells the story if it is done properly... MB with the capital B is always megabytes and Mb with the lower case b is always megabits. Same holds true for GB/Gb and KB/Kb. It might also be useful to know that there are 8 bits to the byte.

    Larry



     
  19. -Draino-

    -Draino- Godfather

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    May 18, 2008
    New Hampshire

    I can't speak to anything about Cablevision but Comcast (as much as I hate them) has awesome Internet speeds. Even on a bad day my download speeds are fast as hell. I just tested this morning and my uploads are running around 9Mbps but my downloads are only around 23Mbps. Of course this is Sunday morning and I'm sure there are lots of surfers online in my neighborhood "node" right now.
     
  20. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I live in a highly populated area and I would think that is a big factor in my cable modem's speed.

    I'm calling Cablevision as I type this. This modem is costing me $50 a month and they just admitted that I "could'' get those speeds with my modem if I was in an underpopulated area. They do have a "booster" and I'm now being transferred to the sales department...no joy there. They do have a booster for "only" $15 a month extra. Might try that. But I did find out that my modem is rated for 15Mbps, but the speed is held down by the number of people on line. So, I've got a faster modem than you do, but because of the overpopulated area I live in...

    Oddly, I do know that there are 8 bits to a byte and also remember, correct me if I'm wrong, that a page in a book is usually 2000 bytes (or is that bits?). I used to teach computer classes and dimly remember the above.

    After this, I will be sure to differentiate between the MBs and the Mbs. For that, I thank you. Now if someone would be so kind as to explain what a "transfer rate" on a HDD is, I'd be a happy camper.

    Rich
     

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