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Driving with electronic device

Discussion in 'The OT' started by kevinturcotte, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. May 9, 2012 #361 of 384
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Every vehicle I remember family having back then had seat belts. You may not have been required to use them but they still had them. I can even recall my folks cutting the shoulder strap and turning their belt back into a lap belt.
     
  2. May 9, 2012 #362 of 384
    fluffybear

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    Cars today may have more safety features to protect lives but back in the 70's when you were in an accident, you took a hammer and pounded out your dent to as good as new while today, you get out the dust buster to pick up the pieces.
     
  3. May 9, 2012 #363 of 384
    fluffybear

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    Not necessarily! an individual may have had a phone in the past and elected to give it up for possibly lack of use, cost, or even suffered a loss at the hands of a cell phone.
     
  4. May 9, 2012 #364 of 384
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Exactly. Every piece of debris flung from a car in an accident is disbursing energy. Energy that does not make it to the occupants.
     
  5. May 9, 2012 #365 of 384
    Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    You completely missed the point but that's OK. This topic seems to bring out strong feelings on both sides regarding how we want the government to run our lives.
     
  6. May 9, 2012 #366 of 384
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    I see the argument as how much, or rather, how much more we want the govt to be involved in our lives. I would prefer to say whether we want the govt to be involved in our lives, but that ship sailed long ago. :rolleyes:
     
  7. May 9, 2012 #367 of 384
    Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Yeah no kidding. It seems the more some strive for the perfect utopian society, the farther away it gets. But I digress. :)
     
  8. May 9, 2012 #368 of 384
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Actually Chris, I didn't miss your point. I just wanted to show a different point of view by using your example.

    It would be interesting to know how many of those who do not want a cell phone ban have a spouse/better half and/or children at home as well as their age. I know at least in my case, a lot of my beliefs changed when I got married and my children came along. Will they change again once the kids are out of the house? probably but that time I'll be told to enjoy being careless.

    Also, do these same individuals have different opinions when they have someone else in their vehicle or are a passenger with someone else? Personally, I do notice a difference in the way I drive when I have someone else in my vehicle.
     
  9. May 9, 2012 #369 of 384
    TBoneit

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    Where I am in NJ there is no capability to have the 3 second rule's spacing.

    When there is space in front of your car somebody always jumps into it. As near as I can figure out they think that the space means that lane is moving faster. Then they realize it is actually slower and they change back ou.t

    I have witnessed more than once the lane changers that jump into a gap, race up and then get trapped there. I have watched their antics as I come up upon them and then as they slowly dwindle away behind me. Slow and steady works for me.

    I'm the guy that can't be bothered to go racing up to a red light and have to brake when by knowing the road I can accelerate slower and get to the next light after it has changed and traffic is moving again.

    When I drove in Manhattan in the early morning hours I could leave the Lincoln Tunnel, get on the northbound Ave. and not have to slow down or stop until I got to Rockefeller Center and turned off. It only required figuring out the right speed.
     
  10. May 9, 2012 #370 of 384
    Chris Blount

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    I have never drove in Manhattan but are the lights timed? If so I really wish more cities would do that. Makes traffic flow so much better. To this day I don't understand why planners don't immediately include times lights even on some outer roads.
     
  11. May 9, 2012 #371 of 384
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Yes, some are, and as Tbone mentioned, you can go miles on the avenues at the right speed and if there're no jam ups. Chicago, too. SF, not so much, and Boston, fergettaboutit.
     
  12. TBoneit

    TBoneit Hall Of Fame

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    If they weren't they sure acted like it. Of course by day there is just too much traffic. But at 4 or 5 AM you could go long distances once you figured out the right speed.
     
  13. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Probably worth mentioning...

    I was driving yesterday... and a car beside me at the red light... when it turned green and we were both in left-turn lanes... and turning left... that car tried to cut me off and I had to swerve and then they noticed and went back and then ultimately ended up behind me.

    I looked in my rear view mirror at the next red light... and the driver was talking on a cellphone. There was a passenger in the car, and I can only imagine that it was the passenger that told him he was about to cause an accident... because he was still on that phone call the whole time.

    I can't help but think that without the passenger it might have been harder to avoid him... I also can't help but think that even off the phone, that person is not an attentive driver... because it was an SUV with several kids inside.
     
  14. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Most definitely worth mentioning. And I agree with your summation of that person being a inattentive driver. I'm sure the conversation the driver was having made him/her even more inattentive.
     
  15. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    While we all seem to agree that there are many other distracting influences other than cell phone use, most aren't as obvious. When someone is driving and holding a cell phone to his/her head, it's quite apparent that they are talking on it. If they're talking with a hands free device, it's less obvious, but still a distraction.
    I don't know about others here, but when I'm driving and my cell phone rings, it startles the daylights out of me and my first impulse is to grab it out of the holster to answer it. Of course, it's behind the seat belt, so that leads to fumbling - yet another distraction. Although I have a Jabra bluetooth device on my sun visor, I seldom take the time to turn bluetooth on on my phone and turn on the Jabra. :icon_stup

    On the TV news last night, there was mention of the Charlotte City Council planning to discuss a possible total ban on cell phone use.
     
  16. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Even some car manufacturers are aware of the distraction cell phone use has while driving. Who hasn't seen the Subaru commercial where the father is talking with his daughter before handing her the keys and giving her a list of do's and dont's. In his eyes he sees her as his little girl. But in reality she's a young lady. One of the last things he tells her is "call me, but not while your driving".
     
  17. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    At that level of experience she is lucky she got the keys.

    Once the level of trust increases I expect there will be less of a lecture before leaving ... and perhaps less of a need to have her check in while she is out (unless her plans changed or expected return time needed to be extended).

    I know when I first started driving I left the house with the understanding that my parents knew where I was and when I'd be home (although no hour was ever set for me). Eventually that transitioned into an "I'll be back" attitude with the parents trusting me and not needing an itinerary.

    I understand how it is with fathers and their daughters. After I got married we would visit her parents and then drive home. It was a couple of hours away and the first couple of times we would get the "call me when you get there" request. That ended quickly. The apron strings are cut ... we don't check in with our parents when we go out in the car.

    It is sweet that he cares ... but it does not mean that no one in the country should be allowed to use a cell phone while driving.
     
  18. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I guess I don't feel that way. I know my father feels like he has to answer as soon as it rings, and it is like a mad panic... I always figure if I don't answer it in time I can always call the person right back. No need to panic.

    Meanwhile... on the "surprise" front...

    How about if you are driving down the road with the radio on and suddenly you get that loud screeching Emergency Broadcast System alert tone? I bet that has caused more than one accident after startling the driver.
     
  19. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Heh. What's worse for me is the radio playing a siren- sometimes part of an ad. Ought to be banned!
     
  20. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Phone calls were less trivial back in the day when a home had one, maybe two phones (on the same line). The one phone might have been in a hallway where anyone in the house could hear it and come to answer it. Adding a second phone in the master bedroom became popular so parents would not have to leave the bedroom to answer the phone (paying the phone company for each additional extension). As deregulation came people added their own phones throughout the house. Then second lines. Now the trend is reversing with less need for second lines and more homes going landline free as "everyone has a cell phone" (104% market penetration).

    You can tell the age of a person by the reaction you get when you say a call is "long distance". For older generations a long distance call was a rare treat and usually meant extremely good or bad news - something important that had to be conveyed immediately at extraordinary cost. The cost of long distance has come down enough that the respect is gone.
     

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