DTV no tornado warnings?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by opfreak, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, as it has been mentioned in this thread, the warnings only show up on The Weather Channel.
     
  2. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Curiosity ... HD and SD or just the SD TWC?
     
  3. Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

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    Both HD and SD.
     
  4. flexoffset

    flexoffset Godfather

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  5. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Thanks. DISH promised this a couple of years ago (on any channel).
    It is nice to see some company has got it working on some system. :)
     
  6. Tom Servo

    Tom Servo Icon

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    That would be up to the National Weather Service to add a new category to their warning list, and I don't think that will ever happen.

    People are conditioned, what with the over-reporting and hyping of severe weather in the south, to perk up their ears when a tornado warning is issued. I don't know of anyone who actually seeks cover anymore, especially with the new super mega doppler one million billion awesome radars that some teeveenewz people have.

    Some local weather people in some markets have apparently adopted a new phrase for when a tornado is highly likely or confirmed to be on the ground, they now call it a "tornado emergency." That's when it's time to seek shelter.

    The NWS has at least finally abandoned the horribly outdated system where they put an entire county under a warning even if it's just a tiny sliver being affected. Now they use polygon warning boxes for more precise warnings.

    DirecTV might know what county I'm in, but I am almost positive they do not know my exact latitude and longitude, which would mean blanket county warnings again.

    It's very easy for cable to pass through that information compared to DBS providers with a national satellite footprint. The cable headend is usually in the same community or at least the same region, meaning they don't have to sift through thousands of counties' worth of data.

    I very much am against having alerts on all channels, and I'm a total weather nerd who will sit and watch the tornado warning coverage for an hour or more when severe weather is around, even if it's nowhere near me. It's from growing up on Birmingham's James Spann and his usually excellent weather reporting. He's both revered (by weather junkies) and hated (by network TV and sports fans whose programming is cut off.)

    But with weather radios, and the weather radar app for DVRs and cell phones and laptops and everything else, there's a million ways to keep abreast of the weather without interrupting my cable TV.
     
  7. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Last night I was under a Tornado Warning that was 45 minutes long for the neighboring TWO counties (with a box 45 miles long and 20 miles wide) that morphed and extended another 45 minutes to cover TWO counties (the neighbor and mine with another 45x20 mile box). There were two sightings reported on the live weather coverage in cells that went 6 miles south of me (confirmed by a NWS employee) and one that ran 12 miles north (outside the warning area and possibly a false report).

    I watched it from the comfort of my couch - with broadcast super double doppler showing where the cells were backed up with internet radar backup I knew that the flash and rain outside my window wasn't worth hiding from.

    I got three SAME encoded EAS alerts on my weather radio for my county. Despite the use of polygons if any portion of the county is in the polygon a countywide code is used. And in this case the NWS just outlined two counties for 45 minutes instead of releasing warnings for the actual cells showing rotation. Being under a tornado warning for over 45 minutes was probably too much warning - but it was better than having a dozen warnings (one for each cell).

    Zip codes would help narrow it down but as long as the NWS sends countywide SAME codes we'll have countywide warnings.

    But some warning is better than none ... if it expands to other channels it could be done with a simple warning icon that could be cleared then (on recorders) rewind to catch any content missed. DirecTV sends authorization streams to turn on and off channels regardless of channel tuned so delivering the data regardless of channel tuned should be possible. I wonder if more people would complain about the interruption than be happy to get the warning?
     
  8. johns70

    johns70 Legend

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    Nonsense. I've never had any earthquakes in Minnesota.
     
  9. ccrowe3

    ccrowe3 Cool Member

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    I wonder why they couldn't just pop up an interactive alert on any channel using the internet connection and a preset zip code if the user chose to turn on that feature. They already send sports scores on every channel remotely related to sports through the satellite. It couldn't be any worse...
     
  10. rahlquist

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  11. Tom Servo

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    That, kind sir, is the $25,000 question. ;)
     
  12. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    That's a ridiculous statement. Sure they can happen anywhere, but they generally don't.

    "More likely in some places" is the understatement of the millenium. :nono2:

    EDIT: Take a look at the difference between CA and NY here, then tell me that they are just "more likely". And from 1950-1994, there were a whopping total of 21 tornado fatalities in all of NY.
     
  13. bobcamp1

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    You wouldn't need an Internet connection. It could be part of the feed.

    If they can command all the DVRs to reset at exactly the same time, surely they could send alerts by zip code that pop up on the display no matter what the DVR is doing at that time.
     
  14. rahlquist

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    Except like most have said. And I will repeat it.

    When weather is heavy enough that a tornado is likely a DBS system may not be dependable anyway.
     
  15. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I would not rely on loss of signal as a tornado alert. With modern home theatre design creating soundproofed rooms to keep every evidence of life outside of the room from disturbing the viewing experience it would be easy to be enjoying TV and not know what is going on outside.

    I had a tornado pass about 6 miles south of me last night. I have a weather alert radio so I was paying attention to an OTA radar feed and internet sources but my DVR was faithfully trying to record a program via satellite. When I checked today to see how much of the program I got I found out that I lost satellite signal about 75 minutes after the first warning was given (for a neighboring county) and 30 minutes after the warning was issued for my county.

    If I had relied on loss of signal for a storm warning by the time the signal was lost the tornado was nearly at my longitude south of me. A storm lined up to hit my house (more important for me to personally know about) would have not taken out the signals until moments before the storm hit.

    The storm has to be bad either in line of sight to the satellite to cause loss of signal or have severe rain at my location to reduce the reflectivity of my dish enough to cause loss of signal. By the time that happens I should already be in the southwest corner of basement.

    I'm covered because I was proactive enough to get a weather radio. But what about other satellite customers? It would be bad if being dead to the world in a home theatre led to one being dead to the world.


    If you're going to build a soundproof home theatre install a weather alert radio and working antenna. If you don't install a weather radio that will alert you in said home theater, make sure your theatre is in the southwest corner of the basement. Just to be safe.
     
  16. rahlquist

    rahlquist Hall Of Fame

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    My point was a DBS system should never be depended on for any emergency broadcast. In the event of a tornado more often than not the severe weather that surrounds it means the DBS wont work at all.
     
  17. SParker

    SParker Active Member

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  18. Rakul

    Rakul Slacker

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    I concur I use this model as well and being out here in the woods works great.
     
  19. SParker

    SParker Active Member

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    Plus it has a external antenna jack so you can buy a cheap adapter from Ratshack and hook it up to an OTA antenna coax.
     
  20. bobcamp1

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    And cable shouldn't be depended on either. Yet they are still required by law to do it. It isn't about being DEPENDENT on it, it's just another way to get the information out. They can do it via DBS *and* via Ethernet if needed. It wouldn't reach everyone, but it might reach somebody just in time.
     

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