dumb question?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Littlegdog67, Jul 14, 2014.

  1. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

    20,073
    1,075
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    When installed correctly, it should not be any different than a "regular" mount
     
  2. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

    5,455
    233
    Feb 27, 2006
    Newfoundland...
    I can tell by looking at it , it's not very high. I had anywhere between 12- 24 inches of snow on my roof this winter. They are not installing stubby mounts here.

    The J mount clearly is higher. So they would not be the same no matter how you install them.
    They are obviously for roofs only or flat horizontal surfaces.

    Most installers around here, Mount to facias, walls, decks , poles, and if the do roofs, they are strictly J mounts.
     
  3. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

    16,633
    188
    Aug 5, 2002
    Dripping...
    Snow, what's snow????
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

    5,455
    233
    Feb 27, 2006
    Newfoundland...
    It's something that was a real problem for us in PA this year. Lol
     
  5. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

    20,073
    1,075
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    The Stubby is probably a foot tall. Turn the dish around (on the linked picture) and you will get a perfect mount
     
  6. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
    187
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    Unless DIRECTV customers are better attuned to identifying what dishes are on their neighbor's roofs, I doubt that what you say has much validity. The behemoth dishes aren't that hard to spot.
     
  7. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

    16,633
    188
    Aug 5, 2002
    Dripping...
    Like Dish customers really can tell that a Dish 1000.2 is so much smaller then a Slimline dish.

    Maybe Dish customers are wondering why instead of one cable from my dish to a little splitter I now have two cables running from my dish to some big ugly switch box and if I have a Super Joey have to have a third cable from the dish running to another little box, what a giant mess of cables.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

    20,073
    1,075
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    But he wouldn't know any better, as you pointed out, Dish customers would not have a clue about a the DirecTV® set up
     
  9. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

    20,073
    1,075
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    Is not like the Dish antennas are that small either (except the 500+ dish) which is barely used now a days
     
  10. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

    5,455
    233
    Feb 27, 2006
    Newfoundland...
    A 1000.2 is fairly small compared to a Slimline.
    Even a 1000.4 is smaller than a slimline.
    The 1000.4 is 22x28, I think the 1000.2 is 19x24.
     
  11. pappasbike

    pappasbike Godfather

    573
    6
    Sep 19, 2006
    Never heard of or seen a stubby mount. My townhouse neighborhood in Baltimore has dozens of DTV dishes, many new neighbors moving in, and all have the support arm mounts. That stubby would be nice.
     
  12. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

    5,455
    233
    Feb 27, 2006
    Newfoundland...
    I've never see one either until this thread.
     
  13. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

    4,153
    101
    Aug 31, 2002
    Its actually not the shape two-dimensionally that makes the difference, it is the shape depth-wise. A difference in height and width, the "cookie-cutter" shape, is not important, a difference without a technical distinction, assuming the aggregate reflector area is similar.

    But both companies are compelled to use a dish that has the same shape in the third dimension, which is spherical in the horizontal axis and parabolic in the vertical axis, and which is definitely what is needed to see geo sats for either service, because the satellite berths are aligned horizontally (allowing for local declination), along the Clarke belt. Such a dish will illuminate LNBFs in a horizontal line, so a multi-sat offset dish aligns its feedhorns in a horizontal line to match their locations to the focal points.

    As long as the physical size of the reflector is approximately the same, either dish will do all of that on either system, because the laws of physics are the same whether you have DISH or DTV. The vertical offset and feedhorn distance from the reflector can be different, because they are not dependent on the sats, but on the design of the dish, and both dishes are designed to do the same job, even if those two aspects may be different.

    What actually is important is how far off the central aiming axis each sat is, the individual horizontal offsets, and this is where things begin to diverge between DTV and DISH, because the sats may not be berthed at the same offsets. Some offsets may not be the same from DISH to DTV, which is what makes some sats compatible and some not compatible. IOW, some LNBs (the separate LNB feedhorns inside the full LNBF infrastructure) will line up with the focal points if the offset is the same, while others will not line up if the offset is different.

    And speaking theoretically, you could probably get any multi-sat dish to align to any particular single sat, meaning if the Ka system is about the same between the two services (and it probably is), you could probably receive one of the HD sats, but probably nothing more. And actually, if there were a way to authorize it, you could probably use the other company's receivers, because they both use mostly the same system and encode using the same level and profile of MPEG4. But there may be differences in how each company employs the SWM channels, and that could thwart reception; a conventional L-band receive system probably has a better fighting chance.

    It would be interesting if someone tried to receive the barker channel using a DISH system (channel 1 on DTV, for instance, the only channel that is probably not encrypted and in need of an authorized card). But since the program map table and other metadata regarding the transport streams is arbitrary, it probably would still not lock in, even though I would expect that you could definitely move the needle on the RF meter. But it would be a nerdy fun Saturday afternoon trying. IIRC, when you see DISH sats on a DTV system, I think the bar may even go to 100%, but it turns red instead of green. Maybe some of our intrepid pro installers could chime in regarding that.

    But all nerdy experimental fun aside, since DBS companies will basically give you a new dish it becomes mostly a moot point. No one really needs to use the other company's antenna when the antenna is essentially given to us for free.
     
  14. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
    187
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
     
  15. willardcpa

    willardcpa Legend

    168
    0
    Jun 5, 2007
    Eugene, OR
    What does a short horse have to do with satelitte TV???!!
     
  16. willardcpa

    willardcpa Legend

    168
    0
    Jun 5, 2007
    Eugene, OR
    Yeah, but wouldn't it be better if the dish was aimed at the satelitte??:)
     
  17. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

    9,873
    805
    Jun 26, 2010
    Texas City, TX
    This must have been meant for another poster ????
     
  18. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

    20,073
    1,075
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    i said a perfect mount not a perfect picture lol


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  19. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

    9,873
    805
    Jun 26, 2010
    Texas City, TX
    My dish is mounted the same as the one in the link. It is on the most northern part of the house on a roof facing north and it is located over the soffit and not the living area. The dish is aimed at the south / southwest.
    Only in a last resort would I mount my dish on the south facing roof as it is the front of my house. Also, all of the TV are located on the north side of the house.
    My vertical pole is 11" tall.
     

Share This Page

spam firewall