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DVR's in today's world

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by mwdxer, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    I was watching an old episode of "What's My Line?" and they ran on Buzzr one of the original commercials for Stopit,. It was conversational, and not obnoxious as so many ads of today. Back in the 1950s-1960s, the ad was not offensive, but with the huge number of ads of today, a DVR is a must for watching any commercial channel. I timed a commercial break the other day, and it was 6 minutes and most of the ads, were something I would have muted, if I did not have the DVR function. You can be sure, that if the DVR was not available, many viewers would never watch a commercial channel other than may the news or sports. As I remember as a child back in the 50s, we never even muted an ad. That came in the 1970s, when the number of ads increased and they because more obnoxious. How things have changed. Don't get me wrong, there are ads that are decent, but most are not. I wonder how others feel about it?
     
  2. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    same feeling include myself (I recall same tone in a many posts here reading it for many years)
     
  3. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    Just be glad you can fast forward through those ads. If programmers had their way you wouldn’t be able to do it. You can’t do it on some VOD content now. Lets hope they don’t take the feature away in the future.
     
  4. vahighland

    vahighland Cool Member/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    That what bothers me about streaming services. It's unclear to me if the streaming services allow people to skip ahead. I haven't attempted to even try out any of these services, despite all the buzz and momentum to "cut the cord." I would definitely be interested in a streaming service or VOD that would allow you to download to a local DVR like device with full controls.
     
  5. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The number of commercials per hour has continued to increase. I expect 15 or 16 minutes of commercials on most channels showing new programming.

    Channels that air reruns from decades ago have two problems ... they have more show than the current commercial load allows - so they often have to cut scenes to match current program lengths or play the video at a slightly faster speed to compress the program for time. The second problem is getting advertisers to pay enough for the advertising to pay the channel's bills. When a program initially aired 11-12 minutes per hour may have been enough to pay the costs of airing that programming. If the channel needs 16 or 18 minutes of commercials to pay the bills they need to cut or compress programming.

    People watching via DVRs are not helping. Advertisers know that people are skipping commercials and may want more airings for the same money in the hope that they will catch people who forget to press the skip button. WIth on demand and streaming (where the distributor has more control over how the content is viewed) blocking the ability to skip content or commercials is becoming more common. But I have noticed that there can be less commercials in a program where skip is not allowed.

    Most of the commercial breaks in the channels I watch are four minutes or less. Usually less on live programming where too much content is lost with longer commercial breaks. I have also noticed more on screen advertising (overlaying ads on the program video) and split screens (putting the live content in a corner box while an ad plays on most of the screen). Channels trying to get the commercials in without losing more content.

    We have come a long way from early shows where a host would step aside from the program to pitch a product or the show would have a sponsor name in the title. Most commercials are now separate from the show - edited in when the show airs often with different commercials for each rerun. Somehow the bills must be paid.
     
  6. boukengreen

    boukengreen Legend

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    I know CBS on demand you can’t FF as a couple weeks ago I had to download an episode of NCIS: New Orleans that got interrupted here because of tornado coverage and it said no way when trying to FF.
     
  7. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree. But again, the Networks would have many less viewers if they had to sit through all of the ads. I know one guy that has a small package through Dish and he just tacks on all of the ad free movie channels. He watches the news, some Golf, but otherwise he is watching a commercial free movie. Like me, he remembers a time when commercial TV was more enjoyable to watch. One station owner told me back in the 70s, that the station was there to sell ad time. The program was only there to keep the audience interested is seeing the ads. Now we have a shopping channels that some people love to watch. Ads 24/7.
     
  8. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    I have a Roku and I will often add an interesting sounding channel that is free. Some I delete as fast as I add them, as they are loaded with ads and I cannot do anything with them, no fast forward, deleting them, nothing. If there is a free channel that has an ad or two once in a while, I will keep the channel. One thing nice about You Tube, there are ads, but you can skip most of them in a few secords.
     
  9. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    I think one reason services like Netflix or Amazon are popular, as for a small fee each month, $10 or under, a person can stream a movie or old TV show without ads. With Amazon Prime, I get quite a few old shows and movies included.
     
  10. tampa8

    tampa8 Godfather/Supporter

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    I certainly agree being able to fast forward is a must, however I don't agree about the quality of commercials today VS back then. There are some very clever, funny, poignant commercials that I actually seek out or make sure to try and see.
     
  11. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    There are SOME (a few) good commercials out there.
     
  12. RBA

    RBA Well-Known Member

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    Plop plop fizz fizz oh what a relief it is. Short to the point and 50 years later speedy is still watchable
    SONIC and PROGRESSIVE instantly FF just to obnoxious.
     
  13. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    The really early TV ads were not bad. In the 60s & 70s things started to change. Today there are a few I like, like the Gecko Insurance ones/ My father used to mute the ads in the 70s, before the DVR feature.
     
  14. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    I'm still doing that ! :D
     
  15. NYDutch

    NYDutch DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    The business model for TV stations is really pretty simple. Programming is an expense, ads are income...
     
  16. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I think TV stations would have run infomercials 24/7 in the 60s, if they thought there would have been a market for them. There might have been, but I do not know if was tried.
     
  17. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Based on the Internet the first infomercials were aired in 1949. As mentioned above, there were a lot of integrated commercials in early television. I'd consider it an infomercial if the entire show was devoted to selling a product or type of product (not just the host turning away from unrelated content to make a sales pitch). I would include those shows where the "non sales pitch" portion was focused on using the product for sale. For example, a cooking show featuring a product that offered as for sale on the show. Or an outdoor sports show (fishing, hunting, camping) where the "non pitch" content is demonstrating the use of the product being pitched.

    I would not have expected a 24/7 infomercial station in the 1960s because there were few 24/7 stations. Most stations turned off their transmitters overnight.
     
  18. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    I would rename the topic to "Ads: past, now and future"
     
  19. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I remember the all night test pattern even as late as the late 70s.
    In watching as old Burns & Allen show, the sponcer was Carnation and Gracie would just go from the dialog of the show into the ad, as it fit well into breakfast coffee and creamers. But it was later when the TV show was not sponcered by the same company, and any ad would be put in with a regular break. At that time the ad because more of an intrusion in many cases. The ad included in the show was much more conversational and often the viewer would not realize there was that intrusion, as the ad was part of the program.
     
  20. sangs

    sangs AllStar

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    I have DirecTV Now and YouTube TV. You can skip ads using their DVR functions. (DTVNOW's is currently in Beta.)

    YouTube's is interesting. You get unlimited DVR space (recordings are kept for 9 months), and if you watch your shows within a couple days of recording, the DVR works as you'd expect - ad-skipping and all. Now, I'm not sure what the parameters are for why it does this, but after a couple days some recordings are "replaced" by the network On Demand versions, and you get the 1 minute or so of ads that goes along with those versions. Doesn't happen for all shows or networks though. Seems NBC shows are the ones it happens to most.
     

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