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ESPN removes HD branding

Discussion in 'TV Show Talk' started by mcrutland, Feb 1, 2011.

  1. Feb 1, 2011 #1 of 47
    mcrutland

    mcrutland Legend

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    Has anyone noticed that ESPN has removed the HD branding from its channels? This is most noticeable with the logo in the bottom corner. Looks like HD is on its way to being the norm.
     
  2. Feb 2, 2011 #2 of 47
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Well, with way more than half the US households incapable of viewing HD yet, I would say the removal of the HD bug is a tad premature. Mebbe it's HD that's on the way out. :lol:

    Seems the NBC tag "In Living Color" was around for a long, long time.
     
  3. Feb 3, 2011 #3 of 47
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Peachtree...
    That statement seems a little outdated.

    Article from the Washington Business Journal (May, 2010) states 2/3 of US Households own at least 1 HDTV

     
  4. Feb 3, 2011 #4 of 47
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Teays...
    But watching analog cable on it doesn't count. :lol:
     
  5. Feb 3, 2011 #5 of 47
    SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Having an HD capable set does not mean you receive HD service, or that you receive it from all of your chosen sources.

    I get it from discs and I get some OTA, but none via Dish. Not willing to change the box and pay the associated DVR and other fees.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2011 #6 of 47
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    For the majority of US households, owning an HD-capable tv and receiving HD programming are two different things. You certainly must have been aware of that when you posted.
     
  7. Feb 3, 2011 #7 of 47
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Peachtree...
    I find it very hard to believe that the majority of households in the USA are incapable of receiving HD programming. If we really want to split hairs almost every household in the US is fully capable of receiving HD programming thanks to satellite. I may be willing to accept that the majority of US households choose not subscribe to HD services (I know quite a few people who subscribe to cable and/or satellite but are quite content with SD) but by no means does that mean they are incapable of receiving it.
     
  8. Feb 3, 2011 #8 of 47
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I'm not sure how they tabulate that 2/3 households number anyway... IF they get it by adding up the HDTV sales and then dividing by the number of households... then it could be misleading.

    We know some people have multiple HDTVs...so that could skew the average to make it appear that more homes have them.

    Just like how the average family has 2.5 kids... and since .5 kids is impossible... it means there are 4 kid families and 0 kid families... and 3 kid families and 1 kid families... so you can't say that most people have kids... it could be that people who have kids typically have more...

    Same with HDTV... people who buy one are already more apt to buy another.
     
  9. Feb 3, 2011 #9 of 47
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Peachtree...
    Normally, I would agree with you but one must assume their numbers are correct based on the following quote:

     
  10. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    Maybe it's a prelude to just simulcasting the HD feed letterboxed on the SD feed.
     
  11. lwilli201

    lwilli201 Hall Of Fame

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    ESPN may stop providing an SD feed and leave it to the distributors to convert the HD to SD. This would save ESPN the cost of satellite distribution of the SD feed and simplify their graphics systems. It will also open up the whole HD screen. No more jamming everything in the SD box.
     
  12. longrider

    longrider Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I was just a kid at the time so I don't really trust my time judgement, but I was thinking the same thing. However adoption of tech is a lot faster now, look how much faster DVD reached complete market penetration vs VHS
     
  13. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Winters,...
    Quote:
    with 65 percent of U.S. homes now owning at least one HDTV set, up 13 percent from a year ago. Consumers are also buying HDTVs as secondary sets. The average household now has 1.8 high-definition televisions, up from 1.5 percent a year ago.

    Ouch! That quote doesn't give me confidence based on mixing numbers with percentages. Such an increase, from 1.5 sets to 1.8 sets average is a 20% increase.
     
  14. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Ooooo, I like that. Set the graphics for the 16:9 picture and be done with it.
     
  15. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    That sounds, to me, like they still could have based one conclusion on the other.

    The only way to get the 1.8 HDTV per household number would be to divide the total by households... so it isn't clear if they concluded the 65% from that or an independent calculation.

    Not saying I doubt your interpretation... but I know some studies have misrepresented themselves at times to push a particular point.

    The increase from 1.5 to 1.8 could also be indicative of more people buying a 2nd HDTV than new customers buying a new HDTV.

    I have no doubts, though, that HDTV is increasing with time... I just don't know if I believe the 65% number. That seems quite high given the state of our economy...
     
  16. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Peachtree...
     
  17. lwilli201

    lwilli201 Hall Of Fame

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    People replacing old TV's do not have much choice than to get an HD set. I can not remember the last time I saw a non HD TV set in a store.
     
  18. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    True...

    But I have a set in my bedroom that is a 32" SDTV from 1995.

    My HDTV in my main room died and had to be replaced... but the older bedroom TV is still ticking.

    I suspect there are lots of people in a similar boat... having a good old TV that is still running strong.
     
  19. SamC

    SamC Hall Of Fame

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    I'm sure there were people who owned B&W sets, particularly as second and third and so on sets well into the 70s and even the early 80s. But the point is that all networks were showing 100% of their content in color by the mid to late 60s. All that was in B&W by then was reruns.

    Similarly today everything on the major networks is in HD. Not only the OTA networks, but the top 20 to 40 "cable" channels as well.

    So "ESPN & ESPN HD" is, and should, go the way of "NBC, In Living Color".

    Now, lets talk about HD Net. Pretty much a channel designed to show off HD, back when there was little HD content. Now say there was a "Color Net" in 1960. How long before that becomes stupid?
     
  20. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    There are still a lot of people using CRTs with converter boxes too. Some by choice since they prefer CRTs, others by economics. It was a lot easier to buy a converter box with a coupon for $50 than to spend $500 or more for a new TV. They'll stay with that until it dies. By then, newer sets may be more affordable for those on fixed incomes.
     

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