External jack for dish install - location and concerns

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by telero, May 4, 2020.

  1. May 4, 2020 #1 of 40
    telero

    telero New Member

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    Looking at building a new house and had a couple things I figured someone here more knowledgeable about installs might be able to answer. We don't want to have any wires running on the outside of the house, so we figured we'd have an external jack mounted in the eve that goes back to the network/TV panel where we do all the cross connects. The attached picture shows the what I think are the best locations for mounting. The two blue spots marked are my preferred locations, just not sure if a roof mount or side wall mount is preferred or required. The view in the picture is from almost exactly south, maybe just a little more from the west. The yellow marked roof above will be solar panels, and the wall at the red box is where the comm closet and all coax/network cables will be centrally located. My main concerns are what type of external jack to use, and what the requirements are for grounding before/at the penetration. Don't want to get everything installed and realize that something was overlooked that would make an installer say no and either want to put a new hole in the house somewhere or just walk away.

    BTW, not the actual house in the picture, just the same design with pretty much the same orientation, but a couple blocks away. Construction hasn't begun yet.

    Another quick thing I haven't been able to find a straight answer on after some quick searching. Can an antenna installed in the attic area below the solar panels be diplexed into the SWM setup and taken to different areas of the house with a single wire? Or do I need two coax?

    Thanks taking a look and for any advice you might have. view from South - marked up - resized.jpg
     
  2. May 4, 2020 #2 of 40
    WestDC

    WestDC Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    D*TV Will NO longer Install a Dish on a Roof unless it can installed (within reach) using a Ladder -or eve Mounter based on your location in the US (which you left out) it needs to face the souther sky -- From the picture -if your house lot is similar location a POLE mount would be fine.

    If you call they will come and do a site survey and install the dish --If it can be done --NO charge to you

    Grounding Will Have to happen Where the AC Comes into the house (BONDED) -Most "NEW" Construction - has a Ground Bar or wire located inside the building -Check with the builder --Will you have Cable (RG6) internet? If so you will need 2 RG6 -One to feed the internet and one to feed the Dish to your Com Box.

    Where Did the Cows move too?
     
  3. May 4, 2020 #3 of 40
    telero

    telero New Member

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    So the over eve location in my picture would be fine as it would only take a ladder. Would they install on the side of the house? I don't recall seeing many installed on sides recently, so wasn't sure if they have a preference for the roof or not. I'm OK with either one, but would probably prefer the side of the house if it's an option with the mounting hardware and clearing the elevation of the lower peak to the right in the picture.


    I'm sure the ground bar will be in the garage, but the closest location to the dish to bond will be in the network closet within the red outline.


    Will have cable internet. It will have a cable run to the network closet where the modem will reside.
     
  4. May 4, 2020 #4 of 40
    slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    If you want to control the dish location you should call a third party installer. They will install it wherever you like.
     
  5. May 4, 2020 #5 of 40
    telero

    telero New Member

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    Will a third party installer be no cost like DirecTV when moving (other than 1 year contract extension)?

    Sent from my SM-G988U1 using Tapatalk
     
  6. May 4, 2020 #6 of 40
    codespy

    codespy Go Pack Go!!!! DBSTalk Club

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    Probably not, if they are like third party installers in my area. The trade off is, you will likely get the location you desire.

    BTW- how come they don’t have Tyvek wrap or equivalent protecting the OSB yet? Carpenters around me put that on right away. It is nice though that the roofers used ice and water shield on the entire roof, and not just the lower row which the code only requires by me based on the roof pitch. :)
     
  7. May 4, 2020 #7 of 40
    WestDC

    WestDC Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Be sure to run an extra one -for the D*TV DISH Down lead as the internet and D*TV Signal can not be mixed
     
  8. May 4, 2020 #8 of 40
    telero

    telero New Member

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    What extra? The cable coax will be brought to the network closet then distributed to the rest of the house from the router over cat6. The satellite coax will be brought to the network closet and the HS17 will distribute to TVs over coax or wireless as appropriate.

    Sent from my SM-G988U1 using Tapatalk
     
  9. May 4, 2020 #9 of 40
    WestDC

    WestDC Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    OKAY -SO that would be 2 independent Runs of rg6 --Like I suggested
     
  10. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Is the space under the roof between the proposed dish location and the proposed network closet an accessible attic or a cathedral ceiling? What I am considering is how difficult it would be in the future to add a second cable or replace a cable between the receive location and the network closet/distribution location. Technology changes and it is good to run enough cable for known uses but one should plan for the unknown as well. When someone else built my home they planned ahead and installed coax locations where they expected to put TVs - that coax lies dormant because technology moved past the standards of that decade. Fortunately I didn't have to wrap a cable around the outside of my house to replace the bad cable, but I did have to cut a hole in a lower level drywall ceiling to fish wires across to the TV location. It would be easy before the drywall goes up to do as the people building my home did and run a cable stapled every few feet to the beams permanently installed and irreplaceable. That would be a mistake. If you will not have access to the cable path after the walls and roof goes up, consider a conduit - a smurf tube of enough size to carry more than two cables where replacement cables could be pulled through in a couple of decades.

    "Technology changes" also affected my CATV connection. Originally I had an aerial drop from a pole in the back yard. It ran to a cheap splitter in the attic to serve a couple of TVs in the house. When I last used it I ran a cable down from the entry point to the basement to a cable modem - and then I cancelled service, cut the cable to the pole and had one less wire in my yard. When I restored service two years ago I expected the cable company to restore the drop, so I wired ahead to that aerial connection and a new location for the cable modem. The installer put in a buried cable instead. Fortunately he could put his service box in an inconspicuous place that was fairly close to my "network closet". I assume the cable path for your internet will not be from your dish location ... that would be another path where smurf tube to someplace accessible is a good idea.

    And then there is the question of how to get the Cat6 and coax to each TV and data location. Stapled to beams in the wall will work - until you need to replace or add something. Adding hubs in each room because you only have one Cat6 back to the network closet is possible. Fortunately my now 20 year old Cat6 is not stapled so it will make an excellent pull string one day - but if the walls were open when I started I would probably have run conduit or smurf tube so I could keep up with technology. I have already pulled a 50ft HDMI cable through my house to serve a kitchen TV where there was no room for a receiver or client. (I had a small receiver, it got washed while my wife was cooking, I put the replacement in another room via HDMI.) Some day I may want fiber between rooms (or not). In any case, a good pathway beats a good cable any day.

    Enjoy your new home.
     
  11. telero

    telero New Member

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    Good point. The ceiling is vaulted there, but I was planning on using conduit between locations and leaving a pull string in each location with any cables that are pulled.

    Correct. Dish on the back of the house, cable for internet coming in the other side of the house. Conduit there as well.

    For now just one or two wired connections per location. A switch if more are needed. With wireless, I kind of doubt the number of wired connections will need to be as abundant, but futureproofing is definitely nice.

    As long as I can think of all the little details. The one pictured is just the same floorplan, so I can see what I want to do before the foundation is even poured.
     
  12. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    It is good to see you are on the right path.
     
  13. peano

    peano Icon

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    I always prefer a wall mount, above head height so I don't hit my head while mowing the lawn, but within reach of a broom for our snowy winters. Looks like you have a basement. That is where I like to run the RG6 through the floor joists to the junction area.
     
  14. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    Wired is generally more reliable than wireless. Since you're asking, I'd wire all your potential locations now and try not to use wireless.
     
  15. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    wired-wifi-compare.png
     
  16. WestDC

    WestDC Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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  17. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    It won't be, but an extra couple hundred bucks to have it done exactly the way you want it in a house you're building is better than having an installer do something you don't like or refuse to do what you want because it'll take him longer or violates his work rules.

    You should add another outside jack for an OTA antenna. Maybe you will never have an antenna but never say never and you'll kick yourself if you don't do it and decide you want to install an antenna someday. Even if you live in an area that today has crappy reception that may change with ATSC 3.0's single frequency networks.
     
  18. telero

    telero New Member

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    Good points. Plus won't cause a contract extension. For a couple hundred dollars, probably worth it.

    Will have attic space that can hold the antenna, get good reception at that location, so shouldn't be a need for outside antenna. CC&Rs also don't allow for an outdoor antenna (except as required by FCC).

    The one question I did have that hasn't been answered, and maybe will change with technology, is if the antenna and SWM signals can be diplexed or not?
     
  19. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    FCC OTARD also applies to OTA antennas as long as you're installing an antenna for 'local channels' (e.g. you can't put a 100' tower up to receive stations 150 miles away).
     
  20. west99999

    west99999 Icon

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    If the dish is put on the lower blue spot and its below the roof line you don't have to worry about grounding. They can use ZOP (zone of protection) so a ground wire to the power wouldn't be required.
     

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