External jack for dish install - location and concerns

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by telero, May 4, 2020.

  1. west99999

    west99999 Icon

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    You cannot diplex OTA and SWM.
     
  2. west99999

    west99999 Icon

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    Also if you order your service through a 3rd party dealer they will usually do a basic install free.
     
  3. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    You can diplex satellite & antenna from the outside to the inside. Once inside you need to split off the antenna because while SWM & OTA can co-exist on the same coax, the DECA frequencies used for 'whole home' and Genie/client communication cannot. So if you want the ability to have an AM21 or LCC at a Directv location you need to run two coax from your closet to that location.
     
  4. telero

    telero New Member

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    Pacific...
    Good to know. The lower blue spot is my preferred location.

    Makes sense. Probably where I was getting confused from searching around and not finding a clear answer. No need to diplex the OTA and satellite connections to the network closet, will just plan for 2 coax to each TV location from the start.
     
  5. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    FYI, around here (FL), framers don't install the house wrap. A separate sub-contractor is responsible for that scope of work so there is usually a day or two before those guys show up after the house is framed (Unless of course they are using Zip wall).
     
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  6. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    Question (some-what related): If the TS was also installing cable TV, could the cable and OTA signals be diplexed?
     
  7. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    No, those overlap and can never co-exist.
     
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  8. DirectMan

    DirectMan AllStar

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    Rather than have an external jack where you would connect your coax, you should just have a cover plate with a connector box inside. Then the connection between the outisde and inside coax is inside the house. All the homes in my subdivision have that structure.
     
  9. telero

    telero New Member

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    Pacific...
    Got a picture example of what you're talking about?
     
  10. DirectMan

    DirectMan AllStar

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    Benner Nawman » BN900 Single Family Residence Service Box

    I have 4 of these boxes on the side of my house - 1 for cable, 1 for telephone. 1 for ground and 1 for satellite (mounted high near eaves).

    Cold draw galvanized sheet metal construction with a removable lid. This enclosure has an open back that simplifies mounting and connections. The service box is nailed or screwed to a framing stud, flush with the mounting surface prior to the application of stucco or siding. The cover is secured with a slotted screw. It can be mounted in several configurations:

    Mount the box 3 feet above the final grade for use as a demarcation point for communication or CATV. It can also be mounted high on the wall below the roof line for providing an access point for a roof mounted satellite TV dish. The box can be mounted just above the foundation where a ground wire attachment point comes out of the foundation. This allows access to the grounding connection.

    For satellite all the coax from the central cabinet would terminate at the box and you would connect the coax from the dish just behind the plate on the box. That way no rust on the connection and easy to make changes.

    20200508_175859_resized.jpg
     
  11. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    To small to me. I’d want something double gang sized and it would not be a distribution point either. Simply a connection point for coax that would go to a distribution panel inside somewhere. And get the biggest distribution panel as you can. Way to many are way to small.
     
  12. WestDC

    WestDC Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Proving -something is much better then nothing (exposed) to weather is okay in short term --bad for the long run
     
  13. telero

    telero New Member

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    Pacific...
    Interesting box, I have done some searching, but hadn't seen that one. Looks like it's got a couple KOs on the bottom, so wouldn't it normally protrude through the siding, then have something like a liquidtite connector on it to bring the cable in? Then you'd just remove the cover to make your connection to the existing cable fed from your distribution point?


    To me, it's too big. Looking to keep everything on the outside of the house as small and unnoticeable as possible. Definitely wouldn't be a distribution point, just an access point to get to a cable coupler that runs back to the distribution closet.
     
  14. DirectMan

    DirectMan AllStar

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    You need something at least that large so you can put your hand through the opening with the plate off and grab the coax wires inside and connect the external coax to it. You just bend or cut the cover plate at the side or bottom to make room for one of more coax wires. It keeps water and bugs out of the house and looks ok so it serves its purpose.

    After attaching to the stud, the box should be flat with the outside siding.
     
  15. telero

    telero New Member

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    Pacific...
    From the documentation, it looks like the back of the box that connects to the stud is open. How does an open back box with a bent or cut front plate keep bugs/weather from getting into the wall cavity? I definitely don't like the idea of having to bend/cut the cover to make it work.
     
  16. DirectMan

    DirectMan AllStar

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    If you look at the picture I supplied, I have three wires entering the box - the coax from the LNB on the dish, coax from my outside antenna, and a ground wire. On my house the builder located the opening high just under the eave where the dish was to be placed high on the wall. So there is no long coax length visible from the outside. The people without that optional box had a box low to the ground where the cable enters the house. So I would advise you to have a box high near where the dish will be placed and one or more low to the ground where the cable (for internet) would enter the house.

    Yes the back of the box is open so that you can fish the coax through the back of the box. The plate is closed so all it requires is to bend the edge of the plate to allow the coax to enter the box without crimping the coax.
     
  17. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    I don't see why something that doesn't sit flush because wires are coming out on the edge is supposed to be better than an external jack. That looks amateurish IMHO.

    Avoiding corrosion at connection points is a solved problem, and shouldn't be a concern. Fill the connectors on the cable end with dialectric grease, and use the rubber weather boots, and make sure you have a drip loop. If you put the jacks on a wall plate under the eave they wouldn't even be exposed to the elements, but if they were and someday the ends became corroded just cut off a couple inches and install a new connector (another reason for the extra coax used to create a drip loop) though if you use the grease and boots it is unlikely that will ever be a problem.

    I mean you have connection points at the LNB and there's no way to avoid that being out in the weather so even if corrosion was unavoidable you'd still have to deal with it on one end so why use an ugly solution because you don't want to potentially deal with it on the other end?
     
  18. telero

    telero New Member

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    Pacific...
    That's my plan, a high up box for the satellite. For cable TV/internet, it comes into the garage via conduit from the street.

    That's my concern with your setup. Open box in the back and open (via bend/cut) in the front.

    That's basically what I was thinking. I'd really like a smaller box, like half height, that would allow for a connector while in use. Then if someone ever decided to take down the dish, put a new blank plate and paint it to match the siding, it would pretty much blend in.

    Ideally, a 90 degree liquidtite connector to really seal it up and keep the drip loop in would be nice.
    032886895654.jpg
     
  19. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Just use a low voltage box (similar to an electrical box) that has knockouts. You run the wires from the inside the attic through the knockouts and connect to F81 couplers installed in the wall plate which fits flush to the facade on the eave. No different than if you had an electrical outlet installed on your eave. No need for that whatever the heck it is 90* connector you posted.
     
  20. telero

    telero New Member

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    Pacific...
    I'd rather have a recessed weather proof box and cover with the liquidtite connector and the coupler inside the box. That 90 degree liquidtite connector allows for weatherproofing and a nice entry from the drip loop into a 3/4" KO. What I'm really looking for is the smallest box possible, but it seems like single gang might be it.
     

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