1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Fewer glitches – Power the dish

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by JonFo, Nov 11, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Nov 13, 2006 #21 of 182
    tstarn

    tstarn Banned User

    1,199
    0
    Sep 30, 2006
    Excellent point. This sounds like more things to spend money on and another headache. I haven't had a problem in 3 weeks (fingers crossed) and it all began when I removed the BBCs and changed to component. No empirical evidence that those two moves solved any issues, however. Just the experience of a working HR20, which didn't work before I did it.
     
  2. Nov 13, 2006 #22 of 182
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    In my town house... I had runs from the dish, to the multiswitch.. that where 20 feet. Then the longest run, 20ft from the switch to the main room....

    I had issues, until I replaced the multiswitch with a powered version.
    All signal issues when away at that point.

    In my new home.... I go about 75 feet from dish to the WB68, then another 75ft (longest) to one of my R15's, and I have no issues. So the type of wires, the quality of the connectors, ect... can play a factor into it.

    And if the signal locker (which basically acts as a constant POWER source, vs the changing power sources from the receivers only), helps solve the issues... then that is just boils down to how the DBS technology works.

    I for one never have seen any reason why the switches should be passive... they should have always been powered.
     
  3. Nov 13, 2006 #23 of 182
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    I don't think has anything to do with "small minorities" of people seeing issues, or large issues.... with regards to the # of software releases.

    It does play into the how fast a software release rollouts there, not the fact that one will be done.

    Ultimately... DirecTV doesn't want any issues in the units (doesn't everyone). So if they have a report of an issue... they are going to investigate it... if it can be found to be a problem with the unit, they are going to fix it (if they can)...

    Why there has been so many software releases, is actually direct due to the relatively "low" number of HR20's out there. As the installation base increases, you will start to see them less in frequency, but larger in size.

    But since the number is still low, they can release smaller releases more frequently.

    No different then other products.... when they are first released, you often see the most software updates... then as time goes on, they slow down, but increase with size.
     
  4. Nov 13, 2006 #24 of 182
    btmoore

    btmoore Hall Of Fame

    1,079
    0
    Aug 28, 2006
    If power is the problem, why does D* go down this path, the cable company dosen't require me to purchase amplifiers to make their products work correctly?
     
  5. Nov 13, 2006 #25 of 182
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    They are not amplifiers... The insert a voltage into the line, they don't amplify anything with the signal.

    The dish requires power to switch LNB's in it's assemblies, so that you don't have to have 7 different LNB's to talk to all the different SATs and the signals in those sats.

    The SAT boxes under normal circumstances, should provide enough power...
    But different type of cables, the number of connections, how the connections are done (Basically the install), can end up in issues and loss of the voltage to power the dish.
     
  6. Nov 13, 2006 #26 of 182
    btmoore

    btmoore Hall Of Fame

    1,079
    0
    Aug 28, 2006
    I know that they are not amps, and I know what a powered MS is, I was talking about equivalents. I do not need to purchase distribution amps to support cable, D* should provide the right equipment to support their services. That is assuming that some of the 771 issues are related to passive MS in cable infrastructures that are in the specs that D* outlines.
     
  7. Nov 13, 2006 #27 of 182
    paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

    4,847
    8
    Aug 4, 2006
    I think the point is, some of the installs are at their technical limit, and it is sometimes easier to spend a few bucks to eliminate problems than to endure visit after visit from D* installers, for those of us who have the ability to improve our own system.

    I personally have bought small items that the cable company should have provided back in the dark days when I had cable.

    The other question is, what if you need more than 8 outputs from a multi-switch? And the answer appears to be you will have to supply your own switch for that.
     
  8. Nov 13, 2006 #28 of 182
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    There are installers that will install a powered multiswitch, if they know that the install will require it.

    In others... they just install what they are told to install.
    And I think that has more to do with the dymanics of the DirecTV - Private Installer company relationship.... Then anything else.
     
  9. Nov 13, 2006 #29 of 182
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    Exactly... it reaches a point on $$...
    How much should DirecTV "eat" to get the signal to all the boxes you want.

    I mean that #9 tuner in the house, you may have gotten for free... so there is a cost they eat.

    Then if they tried to install a $300 powered 6x16 multiswitch..
    That $4.99 month mirroring fee (which partially has to pay for the programming), will take how long to offset the cost for the $300 switch and the cost of that receiver.

    Ultimately it boils down to $$ for these installs.
     
  10. Nov 13, 2006 #30 of 182
    Blitz68

    Blitz68 Hall Of Fame

    1,097
    1
    Apr 19, 2006
  11. Nov 13, 2006 #31 of 182
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    Haven't seen anything negative about it.
     
  12. Nov 13, 2006 #32 of 182
    Andrew_J_M

    Andrew_J_M Legend

    181
    0
    Feb 11, 2005
    If a WB68 goes bad then D* will replace it, but I'm sure that they won't replace a WB616 that you bought yourself. It would be more cost-effective to purchase a second WB68 and add splitters. Total outlay around $100 vs $300.
     
  13. Nov 13, 2006 #33 of 182
    bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

    9,809
    2
    Jan 21, 2003
    So the Sonora....

    I take it you would take the 4 cables from the dish into it. Then 4 cables from it into the WB68 and then the outputs there to your receivers. Am I correct here? I ask because the install PDF seems to be toward getting two WB68's going.

    Also, I found the Sonora at Solid Signal so it's available at other places as well.
     
  14. Nov 13, 2006 #34 of 182
    Neil Derryberry

    Neil Derryberry Hall Of Fame

    2,014
    0
    Mar 23, 2002
    The cable companies generally won't put anything more than a splitter on your service entrance. I was recently with Comcast and had to install a powered two-way splitter on my own dime to solve ondemand and other issues.. since the tech could get most services to "basically work" Comcast didn't really want to help me out. Besides, my time is worth more than the $25 it took to get the viewsonics splitter and solve the issue.

    In this case given the quality of installers I got (MasTec), $50 is also a small price to pay compared to the day of productivity i would lose waiting on the installer to show up and attempt to shorten my drops by doing things the right way.
     
  15. Nov 13, 2006 #35 of 182
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    From what I know about it, it is really recommended when you are running LONG runs, or trying to do a multiswitch array scenerio
     
  16. Nov 13, 2006 #36 of 182
    cybrsurfer

    cybrsurfer Banned User

    614
    0
    Sep 17, 2006
    Hmmm, you should not have paid them to get the service working as it supposed to. That's absolutely nuts for a carrier to expect you to pay for a network problem. There is no guarantee based on what you describe that you won't continue to have problems. I think the problem is on Comcasts end.
     
  17. Nov 13, 2006 #37 of 182
    btmoore

    btmoore Hall Of Fame

    1,079
    0
    Aug 28, 2006
    I think his point is how many windmills do you want to tilt. Sometimes you give up the good and right fight because the pain is not worth it. He shouldn't of had to, but the best path for him was just to buy an amp and fix it himself.
     
  18. Nov 13, 2006 #38 of 182
    Neil Derryberry

    Neil Derryberry Hall Of Fame

    2,014
    0
    Mar 23, 2002
    The problem was driving 6 digital sets.. too much loss. I didn't pay them, I simply saved myself some time by fixing the issue myself.
     
  19. Nov 13, 2006 #39 of 182
    Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

    21,331
    247
    Nov 15, 2005
    I'm wondering if some of the 771 problems are people with long runs trying to power up the switch(es) and the LNBs as they switch from one LNB to another. I wonder if the extra power drain could delay the LNB signal long enough for the receiver to start with a 771 message until everything reached operating voltages. The powered units would help keep the LNB amplifiers happily warm and active.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  20. Nov 13, 2006 #40 of 182
    Andrew_J_M

    Andrew_J_M Legend

    181
    0
    Feb 11, 2005

    I have never seen the 771 problem. My run is 15 feet from dish to grounding blocks, 1 foot grounding blocks to multiswitch, then 65 feet from multiswitch to the BBCs which are connected directly to the HR20. So the "long run bad" theory could be true, but it is impossible to prove a negative so I'm told.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page