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Goodbye, Cursive?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Nick, Oct 8, 2012.

Should cursive writing continue to be taught in schools?

  1. Yes

    3 vote(s)
    3.2%
  2. No

    54 vote(s)
    56.8%
  3. Not sure

    38 vote(s)
    40.0%
  1. Oct 9, 2012 #41 of 121
    jdskycaster

    jdskycaster Legend

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    Stewart,
    You not only landed on the slippery slope, you fell off the cliff! :eek2:
     
  2. Oct 9, 2012 #42 of 121
    majikmarker

    majikmarker AllStar

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    I voted yes.

    There are a number things in life that may not be used everyday but have value in being kept alive for the next generation.

    On a separate note, what about telling time on a traditional clock. I have a nephew (16) who cannot tell time unless it is in a digital format! Whenever this comes up, I have to bite my tongue so hard it nearly bleeds! Not my place to say anything but I am amazed none the less.
     
  3. Oct 9, 2012 #43 of 121
    AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    It bothers me that when a cashier's register total is obviously unreasonable, the cashiers are not likely to notice, nor to be able to follow my verbal approximation when I round the prices off and say, 'Three and a half dollars plus four comes to seven and a half, from the twenty I gave you comes to twelve-fifty change.", and they have no idea what I'm talking about.
     
  4. Oct 9, 2012 #44 of 121
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Voted yes, even though the local schools have cut out the practice.

    This is just another step in the dumbing down of America.
     
  5. Oct 9, 2012 #45 of 121
    jdskycaster

    jdskycaster Legend

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    Does your nephew go to Arlington, WA schools? If so I am glad mine do not. Both were taught how to become proficient in the first grade.
     
  6. Oct 9, 2012 #46 of 121
    BattleScott

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    Voted not sure.
    What is the global trend as far as cursive writing is concerned? I know other languages have it, but I have no idea if they are seeing the same diminished use of or regard for hand-writing. I would assume that they are, but I would still want to stay in line with what the global education trend is. Our kids are already far enough behind the global market because of our failing schools, I would hate to see yet another deficiency added to them.
     
  7. Oct 9, 2012 #47 of 121
    jdskycaster

    jdskycaster Legend

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    And yet, I would look at this from another perspective. What knowledge do these same kids have that I do not? My kids have knowledge of things that I was never taught in school.

    Do schools that cut this out just take recess at this time? I doubt it.

    There seems to be a connection here. Many that are voting to keep it follow-up with a statement about how crappy our schools are. I voted no and will be the first to stand behind my kids teachers and a very small public school system. The difference may be that I choose to be involved with my children's education. The bulk of my $12K/year property taxes go straight into the public education system in my state. I make sure my kids are getting something for that.

    The teachers in our local schools are excellent. My son is not only taking college level courses in high school but he is actually enrolled in and taking a course at the local state university this fall. He will probably take another next semester and two more his senior year. He could not be doing this well if the school system was failing him. We have mid-term teacher's conferences this week. As usual my wife and I will both be taking off work to speak with each and every teacher my kids have. If you think the schools are failing your kids, get involved and do something about it.
     
  8. Oct 9, 2012 #48 of 121
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    That doesn't relate to how the American school system is lowering its standards each year and ranked below more than 20 other nations in the world. We typically spend more and get less back in results.

    The mantra now is...if kids can't do it....expect less and lower the standards. :nono:
     
  9. Oct 9, 2012 #49 of 121
    raott

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    So should kids be taught latin too? School time is limited, I would much rather that time be focused on skills that will be used in real life (which includes math) rather than a skill that is largely defunct.

    I have no issue with a basic orientation to cursive writing, but anything beyond that, resources and time are far better spent on other things.
     
  10. Oct 9, 2012 #50 of 121
    jdskycaster

    jdskycaster Legend

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    hdtvfan,
    Maybe that is the mantra in your neck of the woods and I also agree that could very well be what the statistics show. What I am commenting on is my experience, in my local public school, with my kids. My suggestion is that rather than talking about it in "general" terms people need to get off their arses and do something about it. My sister teaches high school in SE WI. If you ask her what is one of the single largest barriers to learning? The parents. The majority just drops them off or sticks them on a bus in the morning and expect that they will graduate with honors and with zero involvement some years later.

    So you might ask, does she teach in an inner city school where parents are struggling just to survive? No, she teaches in one of the largest and most affluent school districts in the state. People need to stop blaming the system for every failure, get involved directly (not by just casting a ballot) and actually become a part of the solution.

    Our local high school does not have a good technology department. My wife and I found this out when we moved here 12 years ago. What did we do? Just complain about it? No, we got involved as part of a technology steering committee and now all kids in the district have access to advanced technology learning opportunities. We did this for our kids but it benefits everyone.
     
  11. Oct 9, 2012 #51 of 121
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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  12. Oct 9, 2012 #52 of 121
    Getteau

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    Conyers Ga. I don't remember if we were taught cursive in 2nd, 3rd or 4th grade. About the only thing I remember on the cursive front was being told in either 2nd or 3rd grade that I didn't need to write with it because I was trying to use it before it was introduced in the class. I think i saw it on the wall in the room and tried to write that way. Then I remember one time in 4th grade where my teacher made me re-write something because I tried using print for the first letter and then cursive for the rest. After that, I don't have any memories of using it. I'm fairly certain I wasn't using it by the time I was in 6th grade in Texas.

    Now, my handwriting in either print or cursive was probably the worst in the class. So I could see a teacher not making an issue of it because my almost illegible print was light years ahead of my completely illegible cursive.
     
  13. Oct 9, 2012 #53 of 121
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    No, I used lower case 'c' intentionally and for good reason. For all of you who post and chat and text in lower case only, if that little c offends you, just get over it.

    For the rest of you, I extend my most sincere and profound, "I just don't give a damn." :nono2:
     
  14. Oct 9, 2012 #54 of 121
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    ...at least, no one has kibitzed the structure of the poll...yet. :lol:
     
  15. Oct 9, 2012 #55 of 121
    sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Many of us probably feel the same way about your continued correction of our errors. We just don't give a damn.":nono2:
     
  16. Oct 9, 2012 #56 of 121
    djlong

    djlong Hall Of Fame

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    I don't remember where I heard the original story. But then the situation happened to me and I was lucky enough to remember it to use the line.

    Years ago, I'd gone to a Wendy's. They had one of those automatic change dispensing machines (the kind where the change rolls into a little bowl) next to the cash register.

    I ordered my food and the total came to something like $4.79 and I gave the teenaged cashier $5.04 so that she could just give me a quarter in return - but the machine was broken.

    She stared at the money I gave her and then the register, and back and forth. It's like I could almost see her brain seizing before my very eyes. Then I remembered the line I heard..

    I said "You know that day in math class when you wondered when you would EVER 'use this useless stuff'? Well, TODAY is that day!"

    I told her to just give me the 25 cents and was a bit depressed for the rest of the day.
     
  17. Oct 9, 2012 #57 of 121
    jdskycaster

    jdskycaster Legend

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    And you missed my point completely. Do not try to impress with your knowledge of the problem. Instead, try to impress with what you have done to solve it. I offered one very small example of something we have worked on in our school. I would love to hear some examples of others.
     
  18. Oct 9, 2012 #58 of 121
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    WOW...actually knowing something about the issue is now being criticized. :rolleyes:

    A myopic view fails to address the real problem (or the topic at hand).

    The solution is:

    1) Revamp the education system to hold students, parents, and teachers accountable through a results-based grading system. All students would have a tuition for public schools, and amounts based upon a student's results. It's successfully worked in private schools for decades, yielding better results. Since you're in Wisconsin, you recognize that is a politically unpopular approach in your state and the major obstacle to the solution is the teacher's union.

    2) Revamp the curriculum to reflect skills that are actually needed today and for the future, with incentives to excel rather than lower standards to "let everyone catch up with enough to get by".

    The national education system results tell it all. Even both candidates for President admit the system is broken. The solution needs to be significant and far reaching. Systemic tweaks or isolated successes miss the target.
     
  19. Oct 9, 2012 #59 of 121
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Neither do we Nicky, neither do we. :rolleyes:
     
  20. Oct 9, 2012 #60 of 121
    armophob

    armophob Difficulty Concen........

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    It was the military that ruined mine. It went from a work of art into a squiggly line.

    Funny how it served me well in the future with the new credit card readers in stores.

    Some of them don't accept a straight line any longer and I have to add hills and valleys.
     

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