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Grounding Question

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by shendley, Jul 28, 2007.

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  1. rotomike

    rotomike Legend

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    Feb 24, 2007
    here is the deal, the shields are better then the little extra ground that is attached to that dual cable. thats copper clad 17 or 18 guage and not solid copper and will rust out and be junk in no time. Quad shield cable is better in which the shield acts as 14 gauge instead of 17 or 18 like the attached "messenger" wire that people think is a ground but really isnt. If starting from scratch i would run quad shield for the best ground from dish to grounding block but 4 cables would be plenty of ground without going with quad shield. I have installed E** and D** and hughes for years and can say that i have seen systems with no ground at all last for 13 years with original equipment. reason is that the shield is acting as static ground. short answer is not to worry about a seperate ground wire to the dish because whatever shield you have will be sufficient and make sure good #10 guage ground from grounding block to house ground is in place.

    Mike
     
  2. albert10966

    albert10966 Cool Member

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    Jan 15, 2007
    to be a by code installation there needs to be a messenger from the dish to the block, i always use the dual rg6 with ground wire to accomplish this, at the dish a green screw should be present with that ground wire attatched at the other end the ground block, from the ground block 16 guage ground wire to the house common ground (preferably)
     
  3. rotomike

    rotomike Legend

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    Feb 24, 2007
    grounding block to house ground need to be #8 aluminum or #10 copper thats DTV and Dish rules and nothing smaller or its not a proper installation according to DTV or Dish. The 17 guage copper clad messenger is so junk its not funny and it maybe code somewhere but dual quad supllies way more ground and a better ground.

    Mike
     
  4. techman

    techman Mentor

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    Oct 9, 2006
    Up until I had my slimline dish installed I did all of my wiring by myself. Each one of my coax runs from the dish were grounded to a block and run to a ground rod close by. I also ran another line from the satellite dish to the same ground rod.
    When the installers came out to put up a slimline dish, they bypassed all of the coax grounding blocks and ran all of the lnb outputs to the multi-switch. They then ran a ground wire from the multi-switch to the ground rod. They also grounded the dish itself to the same ground rod. I have never felt comfortable with the install but figured that they knew what they were doing. Is is redundant to ground each one of the lnb outputs before running them into the multi-switch? :confused:
     
  5. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Dec 9, 2006
    The ground blocks were to do ht same thing your multi-switch is doing [and for those without a multi-switch].
     
  6. HDTVFanAtic

    HDTVFanAtic Banned User

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    Jul 23, 2005
    If a ground is code (as it is in most areas of the Country) and its not there - if it causes a fire or other damage to your house and insurance discovers it was not grounded according to code, they can fight paying the claim based on the equipment not being installed to local code.

    If you self installed, you are really hosed. If you had an installer do it, you can go after the installer (or they can), but it prevents a bigger mess than getting it done according to code.
     
  7. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Very true and "code" varies with location too.
     
  8. Bill Johnson

    Bill Johnson Legend

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    Apr 3, 2003
    On a self-install going on 5 yrs ago, I grounded my 3lnb dish and the requisite installer from CC came out post-installation and said great job and left.

    Say a strike overcomes odds of at least 1 in 10,000 -- or perhaps almost astronomically greater -- and hits my dish with horrendous damage to everything around it, including side of house near ground where dish is pole mounted.

    Beyond anecdotal reports, has anybody ever actually heard of an insurance company in this instance coming out, investigating, and disputing claim on the basis of dish not installed to code? Perhaps the ground wire from dish to block wasn't connected properly or perhaps I unknowingly severed it one time in trying to cut grass around it.

    I don't ever recall any reports about this on these forums, but perhaps someone knows of such an instance. It just seems to be a far-fetched angle for an insur. co., given the wiring and cabling involved, and I'd be interested in date and time!
     
  9. HDTVFanAtic

    HDTVFanAtic Banned User

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    Jul 23, 2005
    In most cases, that kind of investigation would probably not be conducted with something limited to a Directv Dish and/or IRD. The problem is, once lightning gets into the house, AC system, TV, network and god knows what else is connected, the damage can (and most likely will be) major. That does not exclude catching the house on fire - 2 houses were set on fire here by lightning just yesterday morning.

    That's when you will probably have a through investigation of the same.
     
  10. n3ntj

    n3ntj Hall Of Fame

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    If a separate ground rod was installed, it needs to be bonded to the main electrical service ground rod per NEC.
     
  11. aim2pls

    aim2pls Icon

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    Jun 18, 2007
    chances are your going to take the lightning hit thru the power lines and/or telco (higher level of exposure)
     
  12. n3ntj

    n3ntj Hall Of Fame

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    As we all know, there is nothing to protect you from a direct lightning strike, but proper grounding can help minimize damage and an injury hazard in some instances, such as nearby strikes, static surges, etc.
     
  13. JetsCuseFan

    JetsCuseFan Cool Member

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    Jun 30, 2007
    Let me see if this is correct. According to the second link in post #5. My green grounding wire connected to the electrical meter box IS considered a good grounding source? It just seems odd to me. Then again, I do not see any exposed rods anywhere. This house is only 1 year old so I am sure it was built to spec and code! At least I hope it was!
     
  14. n3ntj

    n3ntj Hall Of Fame

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    You should actually not see your ground rods. They should have 8' of continuous earth contact so, if an 8' ground rod is fully installed, 8' will be buried and not visible.
     
  15. rlgold88

    rlgold88 Godfather

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    Aug 30, 2006
    I have a ground loop hum in the living room (two hr20)through the sub and some speakers. Only started when I connected a new HR 20 in place of an oldhr10-250 upstairs in my bed room.

    I have sat and ant grounded to grounding block then to ground I used a 4 foot rod as my electrical ground is on the other side of the house.

    Inside I can get less of a hum by connecting the wb68 and the ant splitter to the closest cold water copper pipe. But still a slight hum in living room.

    when I disconnect D* and ant cables from upstairs bedroom The hum goes away In the living room

    The only thing I see is different is that the hr20-100s has a ground connection 3prongs where as the hr10-250 it replaced has no gound (two prongs)

    Is my grounding all wrong? should I run my ground from sat and ant and grounding block directly to electrical ground?

    any opinions suggestions apreciated.

    Ps I seen the forum that shows how to ground your sat and mine is set up similiar except for only a 4 foot rod and not to thye electrical ground.

    Thanks Rob
     
  16. aim2pls

    aim2pls Icon

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    Jun 18, 2007
    1) replace the 4 ft ground rod with a 8 foot ... a 4 foot ground rod is about as good as NO ground rod

    2) connect the ground rod to the house electrical ground to eliminate the potential

    ground loops are a typical problem with seperate (unconnected) grounds
     
  17. NR4P

    NR4P Dad

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    Sunny Florida
    Although you didn't state what is humming (speakers? TV? etc), if you unplug the new HR20 does the hum go away? If so, you might have miswired AC outlet(s) where the common and hot wire is reversed.

    Self testers are available at Home Depot.
     
  18. rlgold88

    rlgold88 Godfather

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    Aug 30, 2006
    Humming is from the living room front right speaker The other speakers in my home theater are not as noticable. Except for of course the sub woofer. If the hr 20 upstairs is disconnected by either power or disconnect D* and ant cables I do not get a hum.

    I found that disconnecting the hr20 sat and ant cables No Hum even if powered up. As soon as I connect them I get the Hum. Then If I unplug power no hum...

    I think power ground is fine surge suppresor says ground is ok.
     
  19. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    This sounds like you need to add some ground blocks to those coax feeds [or that the cables may be defective].
     
  20. aim2pls

    aim2pls Icon

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    Jun 18, 2007
    sounds like a grouind loop potential problem

    one way to prove that is to (in good weather for the grounding purest) disconnect all the grounds (temperarily)

    see if the problem goes away

    1) if it does not .. you have other problems
    2) if it does .. its a definate ground loop

    you stated that the ground is now connected to the water pipe .. cold water I hope ... hot will not due ..... check that your electrical system ground is also connected and that there is a jumper around your water meter .. make sure all connections are clean

    before removing the electrical system ground turn off the power main breakers/fuses .. or have a licensed electrician fix the house ground if you don't know what your doing
     
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