Grounding?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV - SWMLine Discussion (private)' started by tony4d, Apr 22, 2008.

  1. tony4d

    tony4d Legend

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    I think I'm ok, but I was curious about dish and/or splitter grounding. Currently I'm setup like so:

    Dish mounted to pole in ground.
    Ground wire is bolted to dish clamp around pole.
    Ground wire connects to 4 way splitter, which is before the PI.
     
  2. 66stang351

    66stang351 New Member

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    So everything is grounded through the pole the dish is mounted to?
     
  3. tony4d

    tony4d Legend

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    Yea, or, at least that's the way I see it heh.

    Mostly I'm wondering, what actually needs to be grounded? For instance, does the dish even need to be grounded with a wire considering that the dish is mounted to a pole that comes up out of the earth? Furthermore, is a ground necessary from the 4 way splitter (I think so)?
     
  4. 66stang351

    66stang351 New Member

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    Generally, you want to ground the dish...being pole mounted is grounded I agree...and you want a ground block where the wires enter the house. Once you are inside you should be ok. Is you splitter outside? If not do you have a ground block where the cable enters the house?
     
  5. tony4d

    tony4d Legend

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    Yes, my splitter is outside just before the wires enter the house. I have grounding blocks there, of course.
     
  6. 66stang351

    66stang351 New Member

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    Sounds like you should be good. Technically according to housing code the pole mount probably doesn't qualify as a ground, but I doubt it will cause issues. If you want to be really sure run down to the hardware store and get a ground rod and drive it into the ground per code in your location...I believe around 6 feet is the general rule of thumb...and connect your ground from the dish down to it.
     
  7. bwaldron

    bwaldron Impossible Dreamer

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    Wouldn't you need to join that second ground rod to your main ground? I'm no expert, but I've been told that adding a stand-alone ground rod is definitely not the way to go. Or did I misread your advice?
     
  8. 66stang351

    66stang351 New Member

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    I do not know the answer to that. Its been a while since I looked at electrical codes. You might be right. However, I think that once you put a rod in the ground it is attached to any other rod in the ground by default...all attached to the same ground.
     
  9. RobertE

    RobertE Active Member

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    Uhhh...I don't think it works that way. Pretty sure the individual rods have to be bonded to each other. Otherwise, technically speaking, the ground rods at my house are connected to your ground rods. After all, we are all on the same planet right? :confused: :lol:
     
  10. 66stang351

    66stang351 New Member

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    Found that if you have multiple ground rods on the same system they need to be within 2 feet of each other.
     
  11. SAlBO

    SAlBO Icon

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    hmmmmm.......I was worried one of you would say that....

    My system has a seperate grounding rod. A six foot (brass ?) rod from Radio shack drove into the ground near the dish. About three feet. I have a ground clamp on the pole the dish is mounted on and a ground wire run to the ground rod. I also have the single coax from the dish run to a grounding block (which is grounded by a wire to the same rod). The coax runs from the grounding block to my splitter which is also grounded tot he same rod.

    PROBLEM> My dish grounding rod is on the opposite end of the house from my home electrical system ground rod.....Are you guys saying I need to run a ground wire from one rod to the other ? It would be a chore but I might be able to do it if need be....

    QUESTION> Is this electrical codes you are quoting or what needs to be done for optimum D* signal and service ?

    I am out in the very rural area of NC and doubt an inspector will ever see it
     
  12. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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  13. bakers12

    bakers12 ΔS > 0

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    I believe the two ground rods are supposed to be connected by 10 gauge copper wire. The reason is that there could be difference in potential between the two rods that could cause current to flow (a ground loop). By joining the two rods together, you keep the potential to zero.
     
  14. SAlBO

    SAlBO Icon

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    That makes sense......Thanks
     
  15. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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  16. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I think there are "levels" of grounding. If you're using multiple grounds for AC, I would feel much better if they were all connected together with large wire. If I'm wanting to suppress "noise", I may want to not have them connected. In my case the dish is on a pole 50' from my house. This is the only ground on the feed. The pole is driven several feet into the ground. If I were to bond this to my house ground, I could actually increase the noise, as the noise of the house wiring could be added to this ground.
    The true answer to grounding, isn't a "one answer fits all". Code is a "general" answer to be safe, but may not be the "best". :)
     
  17. bakers12

    bakers12 ΔS > 0

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    I ran a solid copper ground wire from my roof-mounted dish to the grounding block, then on to the new ground rod. I connected a 10 gauge wire to the water pipe that serves as the house ground and ran that out a few feet to the ground rod.
     
  18. Coffey77

    Coffey77 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    Not sure if I'm reading this right but if you put a new ground rod in for the roof dish, IMO I wouldn't run any wire from the house to the rod. If something were to happen and the wires separated from the rod, then you've brought the lightning into your house - which isn't what you want. If you put the new rod in and are using it as your house ground as well, then you should run a #6 I believe. I'd have to re-check that but I'm pretty sure. :)

    Also, make sure each wire is on it's own grounding strap and not twisted or pushed in on the same one. Each wire should have it's own termination spot.
     

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