HBO Max News

Discussion in 'Internet Streaming Services' started by techguy88, Nov 13, 2020.

  1. DirectMan

    DirectMan AllStar

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    It could be in account info menu item where it shows "offers" or on the main page, I cannot recreate it as it has disappeared from my screen after the offer was accepted. You can also call D* and speak to a front line CSR and ask them if the offer is available. I am sure it is.
     
  2. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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  3. techguy88

    techguy88 Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't be surprised if they merged Cinemax into HBO Max outright.
     
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  4. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    It was rumored in a WSJ story a year or so before HBO Max launched that Cinemax would, in fact, be absorbed into the service. And the HBO Max moniker certainly suggested it.

    But at this point, I dunno. Maybe we'll see Strike Back, Cinemax's longest-running series, come to HBO Max this year. That's the only big Cinemax Original left that hasn't yet. Beyond that, I'd really just like to see Warner allow HBO Max to retain films for their entire pay-1 window. If they want to shift those recent movies back and forth between HBO and Cinemax during that timespan, fine, but let HBO Max be their exclusive streaming home for the full period, regardless of which set of linear channels is carrying them in any given month.

    Of course, if HBO Max were to get not only all of Cinemax's signature original series but also all of its pay-1 films, that makes Cinemax an increasingly hard sell for anyone who already has HBO/HBO Max. But I still think they could milk some incremental revenue out of it, though, by reducing its price and selling it as a small set of cable channels (e.g. Cinemax, Cinemax Hits, Cinemax Selects, Cinemax Family) that exclusively airs uncut commercial-free theatrical movies in HD. Maybe MVPDs could offer it together with TCM as an a la carte movie package for $6 or so.
     
  5. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    I would consider subscribing to a movie-only service that wasn't plugged up with incessant replays of serial dramas.
     
  6. wmb

    wmb Godfather

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    I tend to think on-demand works best for movies. If I had a nickel for every time I came across an interesting movie half way through on HBO or the like, I’d have a decent stack of nickels. It was really bad in the olden days of one HBO.

    Pretty much the same thing for serial dramas.

    Both really benefit from the ability to download them to watch on airplanes.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    That would be an interesting split. Make HBO Max the "everything" subscription and turn Cinemax into an all movies channel package. Keeping Cinemax valuable as an add on to HBO might be difficult without unique content. Perhaps the "skin a max" programming would remain unique to Cinemax (if that counts as movies)?
     
  8. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Like HBO, Cinemax dropped their soft-core pornography content a few years ago (although the old "Skinemax" joke moniker persists). There's so much porn on the internet if that's what you're looking for. I think they realized that continuing to include that stuff in their line-up was counterproductive to their brand.

    My pitch to the honchos at Warner would be to take Cinemax back to its roots as a movies-only set of cable channels, but as one focused mainly on a rotating selection of movies from years past that aren't on currently HBO or TCM (and most of which aren't streaming that month on HBO Max).

    So Cinemax would be to HBO a lot like what Encore (and/or the MoviePlex channels) has always been to big sibling Starz. Maybe they would shift recent films over from HBO to Cinemax for the final 2-3 months of their pay-1 window (while letting them continue to stream on HBO Max for those last few months) to give the service a little extra appeal. But the great bulk of what aired on Cinemax would be uncut, commercial-free HD films that played in theaters anywhere from 3 to 50 years ago. Make it a companion service to TCM for serious movie lovers, but while TCM would mainly focus on films up through the 70s, Cinemax would mainly focus on those from the 80s forward. Of course, they'd have to cut the price of Cinemax quite a bit to make it attractive. Maybe $5/mo as an a la carte add-on, with on-demand access purely through the MVPD VOD platform. Some MVPDs might include it in some kind of bigger "Movies Extra" add-on pack or place it in their top basic channel tier (as is often the case with Encore). But with no ad budget, no originals, and relatively low content licensing costs, it might still be a decently profitable way to ring the last bit of value out of the brand. Maybe they'd even revert back to the original logo used when Cinemax launched in 1980 as HBO's movies-only little sister:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    I think back to when I first signed up with Showtime in the mid 1970s and the service agreement stated that all of the movies would be no older than two years. Of course they weren't trying to fill 8 channels per time zone.

    If streaming progresses as it currently appears to be headed, HBO/Cinemax may end up with just the HBO and Time Warner movies but I suppose by that time, there will be no more linear HBO to fill.

    Anybody wondering where Sony is in all of this?
     
  10. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you were among the first Showtime subscribers, given that it launched in 1976. I think it was around 1981 when my family first got Showtime, but only because we had a cable converter box (from Circuit City or somewhere) and the local cableco didn't scramble Showtime until maybe the 90s. I didn't realize that they only played very recent movies back then but now that I think about it that seems right. I still recall the little intro bumper that played before movies:

    Showtime Feature Intro Early 80s | Retro Junk Commercial

    Yeah, content is becoming increasingly direct-to-consumer, with each major studio having its own streaming service that has exclusive rights to their own films' pay-1 window. As this chart points out, HBO's deal with Universal only covers their films released to theaters through the end of this year. It's uncertain whether Universal will seek to renew such a deal or if they'll instead keep their films for their own Peacock service. Who knows, maybe they'll do some kind of sharing deal where HBO/HBO Max has them exclusively for the first few months of the pay-1 window and then they're shared with Peacock (kinda like how the past few years MGM and Paramount films come to Epix and then 90 days later are shared with both Hulu and Prime Video).

    Beyond that, HBO's deal with 20th Century runs through 2022 and it's almost a foregone conclusion that Disney will hold back 20th Century films debuting in 2023 forward for Hulu and Disney+. HBO's other supplier is Summit, a subsidiary of Lionsgate, and that deal also ends at the end of next year, with Summit films debuting after that then going to Starz (which is also owned by Lionsgate).

    They just struck a big output deal with Netflix. Their deal with Starz is over at the end of this year and their new films thereafter will go to Netflix. Which is a little surprising to me, honestly, given Netflix's focus the past few years on funding their own original content.

    I always thought it might make sense for Apple to acquire Sony Pictures and Television, giving them a big shot in the arm in terms of both production and distribution capabilities plus also a big back catalog of movies and classic TV shows that could be part of Apple TV+. But with a long-term deal in place between Sony and Netflix, I think Sony will remain a mid-sized arms dealer for the foreseeable future rather than get sucked into one of the bigger players.
     
  11. cmasia

    cmasia Icon

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    Watched that Showtime feature intro, then found this for HBO:



    The intros at 4:45, 8:15, and 9:26 are absolutely epic.

    In 1983, I bought a monster (at the time) Sony 27" monitor, with no tuner, and hooked it up to a 10ft. fiberglass dish. Nothing was scrambled at the time.

    The swirling lights and the majestic musical ending gave me goose bumps every single time. I used to occasionally tune to HBO just to see the intro!
     
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  12. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Cool. I had seen all of those HBO intros starting at 4:45 but none of them before that point. I assume that those first few ran in the 70s. I definitely remember the music and the giant "HBO" in outer space that ran before movies back in the 80s.

    I've noticed that if you stream a movie from the HBO catalog in the HBO Max app, you still get a very short intro bumper that ends in this graphic:

    hbo.png

    As for Showtime, aside from the one I posted above that ran in the early 80s, I remember this one that they used in the mid-to-late 80s:

    showtime feature | Retro Junk Commercial
     
  13. crkeehn

    crkeehn Godfather

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    Thank you for the wonderful memory. In 1983 I purchased my first condo, the maintenance fee included HBO. The 4:45 intro was my first exposure to HBO. I also remember them having a short feature on the filming of that intro, which was kind of fun.
     
  14. techguy88

    techguy88 Well-Known Member

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    HBO And HBO Max Add 2.7M Subscribers In Q1 - Deadline

    HBO & HBO Max now has 44.2M domestic subscribers ending Q1 2021 (March 31, 2021). Globally HBO & HBO Max have 63.9M subscribers. HBO Max expands internationally in June first with Latin American then in Europe in late 2021 (where HBO currently operates.)

    AT&T no longer reports the total number of "activations" (i.e. the number of wholesale + retail subscribers who login to the app) but replaced that with a domestic ARPU (Average Revenue Per User) figure and International HBO subscribers which is in line with other streaming services.

    30d00dba20434fa202e8a2f0c79c660a.png
     

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