HD - Why it sucks to be a DTV user.

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by RobR, Oct 20, 2002.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Martyva

    Martyva Guest DBSTalk Gold Club

    823
    0
    Apr 23, 2002
    You might try turning down your sharpness control, it sounds as if the problem isn't in cabling.
     
  2. Mike123abc

    Mike123abc Hall Of Fame/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

    2,818
    0
    Jul 19, 2002
    Want to improve DBS PQ? Well simply get an RF modulator and about 1000' of cable, and throw in a couple cheap amps. Then you will have a nice picture with no pixel problems (you will not be able to see them through the snow).... Er wait, now you have cable!

    I agree with Martyva, turn down the sharpness some. No use enhancing the pixel blocks. Also turn off any edge enhancements your TV may have, or it will enhance the edges of the pixel blocks. The best picture from DBS is from having all the picture enhancements turned off on a TV. Essentially TVs have geared to clear up problems found in cable (i.e. fuzzy snow), and by using these processes on DBS makes the DBS shortcomings worse. Maybe someday there will be TVs with enhancements geared towards digital shortcomings.
     
  3. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

    7,402
    218
    Apr 22, 2002
    Kansas City KS
    That was my whole point on getting the Avia / Video Essentials DVD's - they have tests to adjust your color, and the SHARPNESS (usually needs turned down quite a bit), and the brightness / contrast levels. After you've gone through these, you'll have the best picture your set is capable of (short of having an ISF pro come in). Give yourself a few weeks to get used to this picture.

    BTW - these DVD's are using the user video controls - nothing dangerous / special is being done.
     
  4. daviddavid

    daviddavid Guest

    progressive scan is what is causing the pixelation. A receiver with progressive scan, and a tv with progressive scan, makes it look horrible. It's kinda like they are overriding each other.

    David
     
  5. reubenray

    reubenray Godfather

    995
    48
    Jun 26, 2002
    I agree the picture quality is better with a BUD. I had one for over
    20 years. The problem is that most people can not get a BUD.

    I work in construction and travel all across the country. I finally
    sold my house and my BUD, because I was never there. The
    DBS is the next best thing. I have tried cable several times and
    went to the Directv.

    So just to tell everyone to get a BUD is not that simple to do.

    In fact the family I sold my house to and the BUD (with the 4dtv)
    immediately put up a Directv system. They did not have any idea
    what they had in their back yard.
     
  6. RobR

    RobR Cool Member

    29
    0
    Apr 28, 2002
    Just an update...

    I got to try the Avia DVD and I have to say the image does look a little better. So I would recommend it, especially if you can borrow a copy from a friend who has already spent the cash for it. (Thanks G!) I'm probably going to get a professional tuner eventually. I hear that's the best way to go, even if its a tube.

    Gonna get the oval DirecTV HD dish, though I really don't know why... I guess out of hope and a few more channels. :shrug:
    Otherwise there isn't much of a choice but to get an HD antenna... I guess I'll save a few bucks by dumping the locals.

    Well, I'll keep checking in here from time to time and I'll keep you guys updated and post anything that I would recommend. (Maybe I'll get myself an early Christmas present.) :D

    :hi:
     
  7. Nick

    Nick Charter Gold Club Member

    22,056
    270
    Apr 23, 2002
    The...
    When you go to buy your "HD" antenna, make sure you get one that can handle color signals too. Also, unless your new antenna can receive the old black & white signals, you won't be able to watch Andy Griffith or Lucy reruns on TVLand.

    Seriously, back in the '60s, TV antenna marketers were hyping "color" antennas, strongly implying they were essential to receive the new polychromatic signals - or so I hear.

    The most important 'elements' of selecting and installing an OTA antenna are:

    - suitability of purpose
    - relative gain
    - directional characteristics (pattern)
    - location, mount and aiming
    - integrity of physical connections
    - shielding of signal
    - electrical grounding

    Hmmm, sounds familiar. :eek:
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

spam firewall

Advertisements