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HELP with Satellite Installation Options

Discussion in 'General Satellite Discussion' started by Cobrargc, May 14, 2012.

  1. Cobrargc

    Cobrargc New Member

    1
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    May 14, 2012
    I’m new to the forum and want to say hello to everyone. I desperately want to dump COX as my cable provider. I am undecided whether to go Dish or Direct TV. From a programming standpoint I suspect they are nearly identical in line up and price. The selling point for either one will hinge on which makes for a better installation in my home. When my home was built, way too many cable outlets were installed. I have an average of two per room. That being said, I will likely not use much of the cable in the walls due to signal quality. I was forced to run two fresh cable lines from the COX box mounted on the outside of the house to my HD TV in the basement and the other to my internet modem. The remainder of the TV’s in the house have, at times, horrible picture quality.

    What does DISH and Direct TV use to route the signal to various rooms? Is one of them wireless? Do they use existing cable wire? I need a usable outlet in my living room, basement, garage and master bedroom. Do all of my TV’s need to be HD to receive either providers signal? I’m in the process of replacing the TV in the bedroom, so it will likely be HD before I make the move. I have no plans to replace the 20” unit in my garage and 50” projection in the living room.

    I wished there was an independent installer that could come out to my house to see what my needs are and advise as to which would work better for me. I guess this is why I’m asking the pro’s here for their opinions. What should I do?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Ray C@DISH Network

    Ray C@DISH Network DISH Representative DISH Representative

    914
    1
    Dec 28, 2010
    We have local retailers who can view your cabling and give you an idea of what needs to be done. Depending upon the receiver you select, we use RG6 coax cable.

    With our Hopper/Joey equipment, the Hopper needs RG6 and the Joey can use RG59. Our dual receivers provide HD on the TV connected directly to the receiver and SD on TV 2 off the receiver.

    More than likely, the cabling you have in place can be reused since cable companies use the same type coax cables. Our technicians will test the cables to make sure they meet our standards.

    At DISH, we offer the lowest prices in the industry. If you have further questions, please let me know. Thanks.

     
  3. Alebob911

    Alebob911 Hall Of Fame

    1,622
    6
    Mar 22, 2007
    CERES,CA
    So here is a Directv standpoint from a current customer. I currently have the slimline dish that feed a device called a SWM16 which enables me to only need 1 line to my DVR's vs 2. All installations now a days use RG6. I have 4 HDDVR'S and the HR34 which is a 5 tuner DVR. My system currently supports up 16 tuners via the SWM16 and the ability to expand if needed. If you are in doubt about the quality of the already installed coax in your home you could find a local install company to come and SWM test your coax before committing to have it installed. I am very happy with DIRECTV. All of my TV's have there own dedicated receiver which allows them to ALL to have HD. I had problems try to get DISH because of all the TV and the fact that some would only be SD vs HD and I wasn't going for that. The only thing I do not like about installs today is the fact that the installer provided by DIRECTV or DISH NETWORK place dishes closest to the DEMARC box which means I am seeing A LOT more dishes being just thrown up wherever the "closest" spot is. There are a lot of ugly installs happening these days. If I was jus getting any SAT service I would go with a custom install company because they take pride in their work and the appearance of the customers home as well as the neighborhood. OK now to the receivers, I have one of the slowest HDDVR (HR22) and one of the better HDVR'S (HR24) and the beast of all DVR'S the (HR34). I am happy with the HR34 and HR24 but the HR22 is slow and at times seems to slow down for remote commands but nothing that is so bad that I would consider changing to a different provider. The new HDGUI software is good but is getting better with every software release. I have seen DISH NETWORK'S receivers and they are nice, fast, and look good. It would be kinda difficult for someone that is looking into satellite service to choose because of all the different options. DIRECTV has an iPad app, iOS app, DIRECTV2PC,nomad,DIRECTV EVERYWHERE. I'm not %100 sure of DISH NETWORKS options but I do know they have support for slingbox that is integrated into it, I think they have the ability to view programming from different locations. I know I have rambled but I wanted to make sure that you saw that there are a lot of different options for you to choose from. I hope you see that this was just info regarding both and not a post to brag about one or the other. Both do basically the same thing and I think truly it is up to you and what you want. Good luck and if you have any questions feel free to PM me.
     
  4. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Aug 5, 2002
    Dripping...
    I know DIRECTV understands that dish placement is a problem and in a recent training video even made it a point to find a location that doesn't make the dish stand out. They also tell the installers that before putting up any dish they need to get approval from the customer about where the proposed location is and if they don't like it try to find a location the customer will approve.
     
  5. Wire Nut

    Wire Nut Legend

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    Apr 6, 2012
    Maybe I'm delusional, but I see absolutely nothing wrong with a satellite dish on a home. How is it any different than a chimney, electrical meter, gas meter, roof vent, etc? It is no less necessary than any of these, they exist to facilitate a service the customer wants. If you choose vanity over practicality, I believe you should be prepared to pay extra for it.
     
  6. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

    16,500
    142
    Aug 5, 2002
    Dripping...
    Are gas and electric meters put in the middle of the front of a house or apartment? No, they're usually put on the side or back. Roof vents are on the back of the house roof, not the front.
     
  7. Wire Nut

    Wire Nut Legend

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    0
    Apr 6, 2012
    In reference to the dish being adjacent to the demarcation point, which is adjacent (in most cases) to the electrical/gas meters, which are generally within an easy trenching line to the public utilities ran underneath the sidewalks of most modern subdivisions and not "in the back". I'm not talking about a dish above the front door, just those who complain about a dish mounted above the cable demarc.
     

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