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HMC30 details from CES

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Citivas, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. Apr 2, 2011 #581 of 601
    BattleScott

    BattleScott Hall Of Fame

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    RVU has nothing to do with DECA. RVU is an IP based protocol and can run on any IP network. DECA is just one possbile option.

    Is DECA the correct route for DirecTV's RVU implimentation? absolutely.

    Is RVU the right choice overall? Remains to be seen, but I hope AllVid wins out in the end. Death to the proprietary STB (and proprietary servers)!
     
  2. Apr 2, 2011 #582 of 601
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Let's say that a DECA node takes a dump. If it goes dark, you won't have access to the network from that TV until the converter box/TV module is replaced. If it is the HR34 DECA (not the entire unit) that dies, that means one TV (the one connected HDMI to the HR34) until the HR34 is replaced.

    Now lets say that instead of going dark, the node starts screaming bloody murder on the DECA band. In that rare event, DECA is down and the offending node must be systematically identified and removed from the network (and that TV doesn't work).

    Now lets look at what happens on an Ethernet setup:

    If one device goes dark, that TV doesn't work.
    If it starts howling (unless it howls in properly formed UDP packets), that TV doesn't work but network traffic should continue as normal.
    If the switch itself goes haywire, there's one TV until you can replace it.

    Which is going to be cheaper and quicker to replace: a gigabit switch or a DECA device (especially if the DECA device is built-in to the HR34 or TV)?
     
  3. Apr 2, 2011 #583 of 601
    Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    So your point #1 is "same", your point #3 is "same" .. so you must be really trying to make point #2.

    What does "howling" and "screaming bloody murder" even mean on and IP network? If you mean "crazy broadcasts" or packet flooding .. it shouldn't matter either way.

    DECA give "slices" and going packet crazy would only fill up a certain slice anyway. This isn't the same thing as Token Ring. DECA has been out for a year and I don't think one person has ever once said anything to suggest this is even a problem meaning "IF" it's a problem we're talking 1 in thousands or 10's or 100's of thousands worst case.

    If the Ethernet goes wacky, you are now relying on some OTHER provider (whoever makes the switch) to deal with this issue. Your assumption with this scenario is that the Ethernet switch will NOT do wrong. It's a poor assumption.

    DECA modules are $15 or less on E-bay .. Gigabit switches cost more than that. If the individual is on the protection plan the DECA is free. :scratchin

    If the HR34 fails it doesn't matter if it's Gigabit Switch or DECA .. the HR34 has failed and needs to be replaced .. again .. :scratchin

    I guess I don't get your argument .. The bottom line is that if it fails (your scenario) then something will be broken. In the grand scheme of things does it matter if you can drive down to Fry's (assuming one is close to your house) and pick up a Gb switch for $50-$100 and hope that is solves your problem or if you have to wait for 24-48 hours to get DIRECTV to send you a replacement part. :shrug:

    You're only completely hosed if the HR34 fails, but your hosed with either the Gb switch or the DECA .. in all other "down" situations, you have at least one TV that works. DECA still makes the most sense for most people. Perhaps the high tech guy with access (and desire) for lots of high tech gear would benefit from going all Ethernet, but all of your discussion talks about the edge conditions. Those conditions shouldn't even be considered for the normal installation.
     
  4. Apr 2, 2011 #584 of 601
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    I don't get it either.

    I just thought the post was a commercial for Beagles Gone Wild. :D
     
  5. Apr 2, 2011 #585 of 601
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    As BattleScott recognizes, RVU is independent of DECA or MoCA. RVU is something that rides atop TCP/IP.

    http://www.rvualliance.org/resources/faq
    It seems likely that if RVU is deployed beyond the confines of DIRECTV subscribers, clients will be available that don't feature DECA/MoCA support and will require an adapter. I think it is a fairly safe bet that most all RVU clients will include Ethernet support.
    The "i" series of DIRECTV receivers (that don't feature built-in DECA support, BTW) has everything that is needed to be a WHDS client to the HR34 without the tuner(s).
    DECA is MoCA and I've been asserting that fact all along.
     
  6. Apr 2, 2011 #586 of 601
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    DECA adds some drawbacks of the RF domain and one such drawback is that something transmitting anywhere in the system can interfere with the entire system. At the RF level, one of the nodes could send a constant signal and drown out the entire network. There is no partitioning or subnetting and no amount of TCP/IP packet filtering can identify or fix this.
     
  7. Apr 2, 2011 #587 of 601
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    Middle...
    Except that this hasn't even been seen to be a problem in the real world. So once again you're taking an absurd position to argue over, JUST FOR THE SAKE OF ARGUING. If you ever wondered why people don't like you, your "contributions" to this DBSTalk like these might be the reason. :)
     
  8. Apr 2, 2011 #588 of 601
    Jeremy W

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    That isn't necessarily a problem with DECA, it's a problem with any RF system where devices aren't isolated. The same scenario could be applied to SWM. But it's such a rarity that it's not even worth discussing.
     
  9. Apr 2, 2011 #589 of 601
    RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    Real easy to identify the offending device. Pull the damn plug.

    Your making a mountain out of a mole hill, arguing for the sake of arguing. :nono2:
     
  10. Apr 2, 2011 #590 of 601
    ndole

    ndole Problem Solver

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    I have yet to find a "Bad" DECA on a service call.
     
  11. Apr 2, 2011 #591 of 601
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Ethernet switch failure isn't a noticeable problem either, but someone chose to bring it up.

    When the entire TV experience becomes dependent on TCP/IP networking, network failures will get more notice.
     
  12. Apr 2, 2011 #592 of 601
    Tom Robertson

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    Ok, this is not a DECA, Ethernet, MOCA thread. Nor an installation thread.

    So please return to the regularly appointed topic--the HR34 itself. :backtotop

    Thanks,
    Tom
     
  13. Apr 4, 2011 #593 of 601
    inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    It is an extension of Deca for directv, because it allows them to use deca to connect tv's to their system. That is is what I was meaning. Allows them to tie into tv's without the need to use a different technology than what they are using now. That is what I was imply by saying extension.

    I think it has everything to do with why Directv choose that system. That and the fact you will never have an open system. Manufacturers and providers would never be able to agree on one of open system, unfortunately.. :(


    And this is why the HR34 will be awesome for directv. It will be able to utilize everything they have been putting in place for the last few years, and yet gives them a giant leap in what they can provide for the customer, without any more real costs than a more expensive box.
     
  14. Apr 4, 2011 #594 of 601
    Jeremy W

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    Luckily it's not up to them.
     
  15. Apr 4, 2011 #595 of 601
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    DECA capability is not a requirement of the RVU specification.

    Looking at the manual for the Samsung LED 6000 series (the models talked about at CES), there is no mention of DECA support. Only Ethernet is native and a USB adapter must be used to enable Wi-fi (models 6500 and up are to include Wi-fi).

    If some model includes native DECA support, Samsung isn't talking about it.
     
  16. Apr 5, 2011 #596 of 601
    grassfeeder

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    Hey, I'm right there with you.....I'm holding off buying a TV for the bedroom and upstairs until RVU comes out - I hate boxes and this makes installations way cleaner.
     
  17. Apr 5, 2011 #597 of 601
    Jeremy W

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    There is absolutely no reason I can see that it couldn't be done. However, there is no way they'll do it. They want you to buy a new TV, not have your current one keep getting more features with free software upgrades.
     
  18. Apr 6, 2011 #598 of 601
    Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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  19. Apr 6, 2011 #599 of 601
    Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
  20. Apr 6, 2011 #600 of 601
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Heh. Suggested that a month ago. Still a good idea!
     

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