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Home Owner's Associations (HOA), Why?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Apr 24, 2013.

  1. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Peachtree...
    It was only 35 years ago :raspberry

    I taught my 3 kids to ride in the street not to mention that is where I learned and just about everyone else I knew.
     
  2. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    +1......My dad taught me how to ride a bike on the street and I taught my boys how to ride their bikes on the street.
     
  3. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Kittrell, NC
    The HOA I was in had two tiers of pricing.

    One group of homes, generally speaking the larger homes, had a yearly fee. The other group, generally the smaller homes, had a quarterly fee (that added up to a larger total for the year) but they got front yard mowing included in that for some reason.
     
  4. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    We pay by the year and every lot pays the same fee, which was about two grand this year. New state law limits yearly increases to 10%. That pays for upkeep of the lakes, trails and green areas in our community. We are in an unincorporated area so we pay for everything but the roads which were given to the county a couple years ago. All our lots are one to three acres and about a third of the area is community owned green space. Costs a bit to keep that up.
     
  5. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Teays...
    I hate to be this way, but if I bought into a neighborhood because for example, cars are not allowed to be parked on the street, I expect the rules to be followed. It is not my problem that your kids got a degree in bitterness studies and can't find a job. What is my problem is that my house may be worth less because someone in the market may also want in a neighborhood where cars can't park on the street and when they drive in and see cars parked on the street, my house just lost their consideration.

    HOA rules are a contract that you agree to when you buy a property. Not sure how some states are, but I know in Virginia you have 3 days after you are provided with the Covenants to rescind an offer. People agree to these conditions when they buy the property. If they don't want to follow them, they can live some place else.





    I pay $400 per year.

    In some ways affluent areas need it more. I have seen large homes with no furniture in the dining room. The owner's can barely make the payment so they have little money left over for maintenance. Yes, they have a 7,000 square foot house, but the mulch is 3 years old and the grass has more weeds than grass and the place generally looks like crap.
     
  6. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I have never seen anybody try to teach a kid to ride a bike on a sidewalk. Too many obstacles.

    Rich
     
  7. May 2, 2013 #107 of 114
    RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    Indeed I live in one. It's not painful though: $200 a year, they mow the common areas, and otherwise stay out of the way. We're looking to move to a larger house around here and we're painfully aware of neighborhoods with strange HOAs. Some are 200 a month. Definitely not on our short list.
     
  8. May 3, 2013 #108 of 114
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    My sub-division (54 homes) tried to adopt a set of new covenants in 2012 but failed when they could not obtain 100% homeowner approval (I was one of 4 who voted NO). This is easier when a development is new and the developer themselves creates it prior to selling the first home.
    Could a set of new covenants be adopted with less than 100%? I have spoken with at least 3 different attorneys and have had 2 different answers. 1 gave me a flat NO while the other 2 have said yes BUT that covenants could not be enforced on a home which did not adopt them.

    Today, we have a voluntary HOA which only exists to pay a landscaping service to maintain the strip of common area at the entrance of our development and the signage. There is a voluntary donation (even though the HOA likes to call it mandatory dues) yearly of $100 to help with this.
     
  9. May 6, 2013 #109 of 114
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Wouldn't be on my short list either.

    Rich
     
  10. May 7, 2013 #110 of 114
    The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    The current covenants should have something in there about what is needed to alter/change covenants and the percentage of homeowners needed to approve that change.

    - Merg
     
  11. May 7, 2013 #111 of 114
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Covenants should have a section about what is required for change. In the case of my current development, a set of covenants were written and adopted by the ownership (developer) in 1986 with an expiration date of 20 years. The Board of Governors could have extended the life of those covenants with a majority vote of the Board fo Governors and filing of the necessary paperwork. This is where our HOA made it's mistake, they approved the covenants for another 20 years but never filed their paperwork.
     
  12. May 7, 2013 #112 of 114
    The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    That's pretty interesting. I'd never heard of a set a covenants that expired after a certain number of years. So, who did your HOA need to file the paperwork with? And what happened since they didn't? Is that how your HOA became voluntary?

    - Merg
     
  13. May 7, 2013 #113 of 114
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    I had not either until I went back and read the covenants not only in this development but in a previous development which we lived in California. It would not be surprised that if you live in a HOA, the overall set of covenants have an expiration date of some kind. You may have to look hard for it but I will bet it's there.
    I was told by the former HOA President that all it would have taken was submitting an amendment page to the current set of covenants stating that the Board of Governors had approved the extension being dropped off at the city's planning department 30 days prior to it's expiration.
    For years the HOA operated under the cover of ignorance (what we don't tell you, won't hurt!). Today, we all contribute a small token in order to maintain our developments entrance and that's it. There is no legal requirement anyone send them a check once a year and if you don't, there is nothing they can do about it.
     
  14. May 7, 2013 #114 of 114
    trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    My HOA is valid for 40 years and "automatically extended for successive periods of ten years unless terminated" by a vote of 90% of the owners. But in FL, HOAs fall under a CDD, so that may make ours different than other states.

    From Wikipedia:
     

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