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Home-School Child Wins Yet Another National Contest

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Frapp, May 25, 2005.

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  1. Frapp

    Frapp Icon

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    Congrats to this fine fellow:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7979889/


    Nice to see homeschooled children continuing to take over the pre-college academics in the U.S.A. :up:
     
  2. cdru

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    And everytime I hear of a home school child winning a contest, I always remember the great social skills of Rebecca Sealfon screaming the answer to the National Spelling Bee in 1997.
     
  3. RJS1111111

    RJS1111111 Icon/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Would you have preferred to have some lobotomized savant win the bee, in some quiet manner more "socially acceptable" to you? Why diss the girl's enthusiasm and individuality?
     
  4. Geronimo

    Geronimo Native American Potentate DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I doubt I would educate my kids that way but congrats to the home schoolers. I would like to see how the kids as a whole do on standardized tests and the lot but I am sure that it is a n appropriate choice for some families.
     
  5. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    Home schooling, like driving an "Element", is not for everyone. ;)
     
  6. cdru

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    No. I'd settle for just averge joe/jane sounding kid with enough social skills to realize what they are doing and how they sound. Enthusiasm and individuality is one thing. Psychotic screaming is another. Never before (and hopefully never again) has anyone felt it necessary to SCREAM the letters into a microphone. Other contestants were annoyed by here screaming of the words. The judges were annoyed. The announcers even were laughing at her.
     
  7. RJS1111111

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    She seems average enough to me, for a teenager winning the national spelling bee, whose heart is really in it. Of course, the children in my household do tend to be on the loud side... We're probably not raising them with all of the right social skills... :p
     
  8. JM Anthony

    JM Anthony Child of the 60's DBSTalk Gold Club

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    And you think that has any correlation with their success, particularly in working with others, later in life?? We live in a large city (Seattle) and our kids have gone to public schools, and they've been exposed to lots of things that have contributed to their education.
     
  9. Danny R

    Danny R Goblin the Pug DBSTalk Gold Club

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    She seems average enough to me, for a teenager winning the national spelling bee, whose heart is really in it.

    Yeah, I didn't see anything really odd about it either. Its not as if she talked that way normally in casual conversations. Rather, she obviously knew she had the answer correct, and was ecstatic about it. After all, she did just win a national championship.

    I see far worse behavior at other sporting events.

    On the other hand, screaming state names did pretty much taint Howard Dean as a psycho too. ;)
     
  10. Bogy

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    And Howard was trying to make himself heard above a roomful of screaming supporters.
     
  11. Ryan

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    I agree with Tony Kornheiser: "Twitching little freaks" (that's spelling bee contestants in general, not home schoolers)
     
  12. TNGTony

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    I see that there is an incorrect assumption here that home schooled kids are spirited away and never have contact with the outside world. Nothing is further from the truth. At work we host a "Home School Video Club" to go along with two local high school and middle school video clubs. The kids in the home school club (6th-12th grades-12 to 17 year-olds) are just as lively, interactive and socially fit as the public school kids. The home schoolers I've dealt with are just as chatty and inquisitive as their public school counterparts. The difference is that the home school kids (in general) are attentive, communicate clearly and concisely, and show respect for authority figures. On the whole, the public school kids are wild, inattentive, rude (lack of general social politeness) and talk with marbles in their mouths.

    I got to know lots of parents and home school educators. They all tell me that they spend much of their time in groups like our video club. The kids interact with many other home schoolers in all sorts of clubs, symposiums, lectures and events. They are also all involved in many extra-curricular activities such as sports teams, chiors, orchestras, bands and clubs.

    So the image of the lonely student with nothing but books and an overbearing parent as a teacher is completely wrong.

    The video club supervisor at work tells me that she wishes all her clubs were as fun to teach as the home schoolers!

    See ya
    Tony
     
  13. MarkA

    MarkA God Bless America! DBSTalk Gold Club

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    "I see far worse behavior at other sporting events."

    I think THAT'S the problem. The spelling be winner isn't expected to be a normal child. They're expected to be a quiet, reserved, Harvard-ready genius...

    You can tell what I think of what she did :) Perfectly normal... it's the rest of the spelling bee-ers who could use some lightening up.

    Regarding home school children, I've spent enough time with enough of them to notice that they are in one of two groups - the best and the brightest in America, or essentially uneducated.

    Regarding social skills, they're usually on par with their public school peers. Remember, they certainly do get social interaction time through church, through outside clubs such as 4-H or soccer, and through home schooling groups that meet together. Most of them get more healthy social interaction than the child who goes home at 3:00PM and plays video games until bedtime (frowned upon in most of the better homeschooling families)
     
  14. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    A spelling bee may be a contest, but it is definitely not a sporting event. It has more of the characteristics of Star Search
    than (not then) it does a football game.
     
  15. Ryan

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    There's nothing intrinsically wrong with home schooling, but I think it is often used to hermit children away from society due to fear, prejudice, ignorance, etc.
     
  16. TNGTony

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    BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ... Sorry, thanks for playing.

    It is a way for people who cannot otherwise afford private school to give their children the education they know cannot be given by the local public school. Most of the home schoolers in our area are from 2 particular school districts which are TERRIBLE. The other 5 districts in our area are fair to good and have much fewer home schoolers. The economic status of most of the families are middle income. One family in particular has one child in college, one in a $12k a year private High School and 1 child in 8th grade equivilant home school. He will most likely be atteninding the same high school as his sibling on scholarship next year. These people live like paupers and are broke. But they are giving their kids an education that cannot be beat. They are also (on the surface anyway) the Norman Rockwell family with some of the best adjusted kids I've ever met.

    As to "hermit from society", as I explained in my previous post, most of the home school kidds I know (about 3 dozen) are involved in more extra-curricular events than their public school counterparts. All are involved in several home school "groups" that interact constantly.

    See ya
    Tony
     
  17. cdru

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    I know I never made such an assumption. I only commented that when I hear "home school", I always think of one particular person. In that case, I think she did have some possible social issues. Obviously others here disagreed, but it was MY opinion and I'm sticking with it.

    I know that there are home, public, or private schooled kids that have become geniouses or failures, social dignitary or social outcasts. I agree with Ryan's comment above that home schooling often gets used to "protect" children, even when it's really not the best thing for them.

    Gosh. If only there was some type of an organization that brought students together into groups for these types of activities. Maybe we could even have a person who is knowledgable in that area be on hand to help with questions or provide guidance in the education. I know I'm just talking crazy. Such a facility would never exist.
     
  18. Bogy

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    Like cdru, my opinion of home schooling is prejudiced by a particular example. The way my cousin has raised her kids, or perhaps more precisely, the way her husband has insisted their kids be raised and schooled. For them is was to hide them away from the world. My parents were visiting them one time, and one of the daughters was telling them about her soccer team. She mentioned about some of the girls that she talked with at practice and games. Her father, who had not been participating in the conversation, whipped around and demanded to know who she had been talking with, and threatened to pull her from the team if she talked with them again. This is also a family which held church services in their home with one other family for a long time, because they could find no church which was faithful to God, in their eyes.

    Nuts like this is what gives home schooling a bad name. Hopefully they are the minority, but they attract people's attention. We had a family in the Omaha area where one daughter burned down their home and killed her brother and sister. She was trying to kill her step-father because he had been sexually abusing her for years. She was "home-schooled." Which case do you think will stick in people's minds longer, the spelling bee winner or the arsonist?
     
  19. Ryan

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    I never meant most home schooled (HSed) children. But there are definately people who do hide away from society. Your comments are a good study in charter school reform, and possibly vouchers. (I support charter schools and see both benefits and faults in a voucher system) People anywhere and everywhere should be able to receive good education for their tax dollars.

    Home schooling is a vaild educational standard. (Personally, I'm glad my boys go off to daycare, as I'm not much of the stay-at-home Dad type. I don't mind being home, but they boys get much more to do at school than they do at home. Their lives, and my sanity, are better for it!) And there are certainly more reasons than societal and educational that people choose home schooling for their kids. The flexability it offers must be unparalleled.
     
  20. TNGTony

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    If you are referring to a school with a teacher controlled DIRECTLY by the parents, you are right. It would NEVER exist in this society. Why? Because the instant you do, you have state and federal mandates remove the choices from the parents. Again I am involved with two local school boards and it is astonishing how little local control actually remains.

    As to your opinion, it is based on flawed data. You can hold on to it if you wish but it does not make the assumption correct.

    See ya
    Tony
     
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