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How big is your house/apartment?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Chris Blount, Apr 14, 2009.

How big is your house/apartment?

  1. Less than 1000 Square Feet

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. 1001 - 1500 Square Feet

    6 vote(s)
    4.8%
  3. 1501-2000 Square Feet

    31 vote(s)
    25.0%
  4. 2001 - 2500 Square Feet

    50 vote(s)
    40.3%
  5. 2501 - 3000 Square Feet

    18 vote(s)
    14.5%
  6. More than 3000 Square Feet

    19 vote(s)
    15.3%
  1. festivus

    festivus Legend

    200
    7
    Nov 9, 2008
    We're at 2516 sq ft not counting the finished basement. Open floor plan.
    Finished basement is about 1100 sq ft. Got a 106 inch screen down there.
    Unfinished part of the basement (furnace, water tanks, storage is about 400-500 sq ft.

    Perfect for me, wife, 17 year old son and dog. Plenty of room for guests.

    Only drawback is 2 car garage. I could really use a 3.
     
  2. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

    6,503
    98
    Mar 18, 2006
    Teays...
    Ours are based on the outside dimensions less garage. So if you have an unconditioned/undrywalled mechanical room, it is part of your square footage.
     
  3. Maui

    Maui Legend

    117
    0
    Feb 16, 2009
    3700 sf in the homestead and 2100 sf at the beach. The homestead is way more house than we need for three people but we like it.
     
  4. brant

    brant Icon

    755
    0
    Jul 6, 2008
    my house is 1250 sq. ft.

    my yard is 23,958,000 sq. ft.
     
  5. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

    3,761
    11
    Nov 2, 2006
    Phoenix,...
    1500
     
  6. dave29

    dave29 New Member

    5,945
    40
    Feb 18, 2007
    550 acres, thats pretty impressive:)
     
  7. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

    32,456
    258
    Jul 28, 2004
    That would kill us here as far as property taxes...:eek2::eek2::eek2::D
     
  8. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

    1,575
    35
    Jan 21, 2004
    Laurel, MD
    As far as I can tell, square footage makes up only one small factor in assessing property taxes in my state, and only peripherally in that of two otherwise identical houses, on adjacent lots, one with more square footage would pay more taxes. But location, construction materials, type of dwelling, all contribute more. Our taxes are based on the "fair market value" of the property. A 4000 sq. ft. run-down POS in a Baltimore slum might assess for a lot less than a 1200 sq. ft. luxury condo in a gated community in Potomac.
     
  9. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

    32,456
    258
    Jul 28, 2004
    The use a formula based on assessed value X millage rate (set by the county each year), which is in turn based on the land/lot size & home qq. ft. here and at least in 5 other states I've lived in.

    The millage rate may vary, and in turn the assessed value based on location, but sq. ft. is definitely used.

    Every home in our county has a property tax bill where sq. footage is listed and used in the presentation of the tax bill each year. What's interesting, of course, is they are rarely accurate in sq. ft. :D
     
  10. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    15,052
    317
    Jan 18, 2007
    Northern...
    And then there is California where Proposition 13 limited the tax rate statewide to 1% of assessed value. Under Proposition 13, assessed value is generally what you paid for the home increased 2% a year since the year you bought it.

    So we old folks who bought our home in 1988 pay taxes based on the 1988 market value plus 45% (the compounding effect). A young family buying a home in 1998 with the same 1998 market value as ours would be paying 64% higher property taxes then we do. In 2005 when I sold my parents home for double what our home was worth, my mother had been paying less than half of what we were paying in property taxes.

    So, assuming grandma stayed in the home she bought before 1978, mom and dad live in the home they bought in 1988, the adult kids live in the home they bought in 1998, and all three home have comparable market value, for every dollar in property taxes paid by grandma, mom and dad pay $2.46, and the adult kids pay $4.04. And Chevron, P.G.&E. and other major long-time corporate property owners pay on the same basis as grandma.

    If I had moved into my mother's house, I would have retained the assessed value.

    Since the County Assessor can appraise any improvements (as opposed to maintenance and repairs) based on current cost/value and add it to your assessed value, guess how ofter people don't get building permits.

    You've got to love populist democracy in action.
     
  11. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

    32,456
    258
    Jul 28, 2004
    Yuck and double yuck - it might also explain California's shrinking population. :D
     
  12. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

    21,331
    0
    Mar 25, 2002
    Sounds like Florida did a variation on the theme. Before I moved here the people of Florida found that they could make their neighbors (especially out of state owners) pay a large portion of the property taxes required to run the state. They voted for the "Save our Homes Act" which limits increases in assessed values of HOMESTEADED housing to 3% per year. Of course, snowbird's houses are not homesteaded, so their increases have no caps on them. The property tax on my house, purchased in 1995, but not homesteaded until 1996 are $1753/year. The taxes on my next door neighbor's house that he purchased in 2002 are $4460 per year. His assessed value is $281,000, my assessed value is $271,000. Something just doesn't seem right here. Last year, the people of Florida decided to dig deeper into their neighbor's pockets by doubling the homestead exemption from $25K to $50K, meaning if you live here for 6 months and a day per year $50K is deducted from the assessed value of the home before it is taxed. Of course, this has to be made up by taxing snowbirds and commercial property at a still higher rate. Also last year, the people of Florida made the Save our Home rules portable, so that what I save on my house goes with me if I buy another house in the state of Florida.
     
  13. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    45,944
    1,024
    Apr 17, 2003
    Michiana
    My state passed a 1% cap on property taxes. Then the local taxing authority raised the accessed value on my house so 1% of value is higher than it was before. Some areas have seen steep increases in accessed value to adjust for the 1% cap. (IIRC there was a 2% cap on rental properties and 3% on other commercial properties.) Oh, they also raised the state sales tax to compensate so, yes Virginia, the overall taxes being paid went up!

    (Not that this has much to do with the topic of the thread --- which is supposed to be how big your house is not going political on paying taxes. But tis the season. :) )
     
  14. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

    6,503
    98
    Mar 18, 2006
    Teays...
    Ours are assessed strictly on appraised value or recent sale. Since they have a recent sale for mine, that is what they use.

    Bur property taxes here are low.:)

    Many years ago when I lived in the city of Huntington, we were assessed a city "maintenance fee" which included garbage pickup etc. This fee was based on the sq. footage. But it was skewed as the family with 4 kids living in 1200' generated much more trash than me alone living in 1840'. Yet I paid more. :confused:
     
  15. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

    1,575
    35
    Jan 21, 2004
    Laurel, MD
    That kind of thing always got to me too. In Switzerland they have an intersting solution. You have to buy "trash collection tax" stickers from the gov't. and they won't pick up a trash bag without a sticker on it. I assume there is a limit to the size and weight of the bags, but it certainly encourages people to recycle, compost, and reduce waste in any way they can. A friend of mine lives on a dairy farm (Swiss cheese!) outside Bern, so they can also burn all their paper trash, leaving very little to be collected.
     
  16. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

    21,331
    0
    Mar 25, 2002
    I'd be bankrupt. Last week at the hurricane house I put out over 20 bags of leaves in one day. They had been collecting in the yard since the hurricanes of 2004 came through. In the good old days you could just collect all the leaves on the curb and toss a match on them.
     

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