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How does the HD picture quality of D* and E* actually compare?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by skatingrocker17, Mar 19, 2011.

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  1. Mar 20, 2011 #21 of 142
    Rich

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    I'm still trying to wrap my head around that (bandwidth). Seems like it's analogous to current flow in different size wires, but I'm not really sure, haven't read enough about it.

    Rich
     
  2. Mar 20, 2011 #22 of 142
    dsw2112

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    The old water pipe analogy for current is useful in thinking of bandwidth.
     
  3. Mar 20, 2011 #23 of 142
    veryoldschool

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    I can send a 10 lbs package.
    In this package:
    I can put 4 2.5 lbs items, or put 5 2 lbs items.
    I can only send 10 lbs.
     
  4. Mar 20, 2011 #24 of 142
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    ...and the 2 lb packages may be prettier with a bow on them... :D
     
  5. Mar 20, 2011 #25 of 142
    TheRatPatrol

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    Ok stupid question time, but how do you put something back if its removed at the beginning? :eek:
     
  6. Mar 20, 2011 #26 of 142
    Hutchinshouse

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    100% correct.

    It all comes down to TV size, TV calibration and viewing distance.

    Technically DIRECTV is better. However, this does not mean all will see a difference.
     
  7. Mar 20, 2011 #27 of 142
    Rich

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    Yeah, I get that, but then I don't see what prohibits more bandwidth. I know that #14 wire will carry more amperage than #16 wire will, and I understand why, but where does that fit into the bandwidth analogy? I get so far thinking about bandwidth then I go blank. Not enough knowledge. What's the bigger pipe carrying the water made of?

    Rich
     
  8. Mar 20, 2011 #28 of 142
    Rich

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    What prohibits you from using a 20 pound package? That's what I don't get. I'm used to, "Oops, that's a 20 amp breaker, I have to use #12 wire with that to get the full amperage supplied thru the breaker."

    Rich
     
  9. Mar 20, 2011 #29 of 142
    Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 Active Member

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    There are factual technical differences between the two and how they deliver HD. DirecTV actually does offer better HD picture quality. That is not a matter of opinion or preference.
     
  10. Mar 20, 2011 #30 of 142
    Rich

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    That confused me too, but I wanted to focus on one thing. This stuff drives me nuts.....:lol:

    Or nuttier.

    Rich
     
  11. Mar 20, 2011 #31 of 142
    HoTat2

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    If it falls into the category of a "lossy" form of compression as down-rezzing does, then it can not actually be put back.

    The trick therefore is to remove only those portions of the picture who's loss would be subjectively imperceptible to the average human eye response.

    So considering that the eye is more sensitive to loss of vertical image resolution than horizontal. DN exploits this characteristic to conserve bandwidth by down-rezzing 1920x1080 programs to 1440x1080 resolution for transmission.
     
  12. Mar 20, 2011 #32 of 142
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    That will broke a neck of the mule. :)

    Seriously, it would reduce for the 25% the other wire's load if you will keep same breaker max and rise to 1920x1080i.
    Remember, to the 'breaker' [mux] you connected many wires/loads [PIDs or channels].

    Plus you will force changing all MPEG-4 encoders or at least reprogramming them.
     
  13. Mar 20, 2011 #33 of 142
    veryoldschool

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    UPS won;t pickup a 20 lbs package, and you can't get them to pick up two either. :lol:
    Look at this from having a #16 wire [bandwidth] instead of the other way, where you have a 20 amp breaker.
     
  14. Mar 20, 2011 #34 of 142
    Rich

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    I actually understood that! Thanx! Seems like Dish is kinda cheating, doesn't it?

    Rich
     
  15. Mar 20, 2011 #35 of 142
    Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Doesnt matter if you use #10 wire, if you dont use the capacity, its a waste of money :)
     
  16. Mar 20, 2011 #36 of 142
    mdavej

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    I think we can stipulate that D* has superior HD (more pixels, more bandwidth, etc.). But the OP's question is how noticeable is that difference.
     
  17. Mar 20, 2011 #37 of 142
    Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Fox, ABC, Disney etc, all do the same thing up front with 1280x720. Our local PBS actually goes as far as downrezzing 1920x1080 to 1280x720. Actually, whether you can actually see the difference depends on the size of your TV, and the distance you sit from it. Anyone sitting 12' from a 46" or smaller tv would probably not be able to tell the difference.
     
  18. Mar 20, 2011 #38 of 142
    veryoldschool

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    How does a jpeg image do it?
    if every fourth "dot" is removed, then the rest is transmitted, and then every fourth "dot" is an average of the dots on either side, you get back to the "full" image, but 25% is "made up" at the end.
    This too caused me to wonder how it was done long ago.
    "the key" is to be able to look at the transmitted image. This looks squished [distorted] and isn't something anybody would want.
    Think of this like what "stretched" SD looks like, but going the other way.
     
  19. Mar 20, 2011 #39 of 142
    Hutchinshouse

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    Bingo!

    It all comes down to TV size, TV calibration and viewing distance.
     
  20. Mar 20, 2011 #40 of 142
    veryoldschool

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    "And" what the viewer has for a reference.
    "Most" may not know what they're missing.
     
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