How is the Corona Virus affecting you personally?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. Apr 4, 2020 #101 of 173
    billsharpe

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    Just took a neighborhood walk. People are wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from others. Yes, we want to get people back to work, but no, we don't want to have more people dying because we're doing that. I'm hoping to still reach my 90th birthday in July.

    I also was hoping our President would have endorsed the CDC recommendation about wearing a mask by saying "I'm wearing one in pubic and we all should tool"
     
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  2. Apr 4, 2020 #102 of 173
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    At this point I check the trackers because I am not an ostrich burring my head in the sand hoping the problem I saw will simply go away. This particular "car crash" is not off to the side of the road in Asia or Europe. It is in the road in front of us and we as a nation need to figure out how to navigate through the wreckage safely. Or a better solution would be to STOP and give first responders the chance to clean up the incident before we drive through it.

    In my county we have had 31 people (human beings) test positive and 3 die. Hundreds are still waiting for the results of their tests, including the dead. The state does not add a person to the death toll unless they test positive. I cannot politely state how I feel about people (allegedly human, but lacking humanity) who downplay the death and illness of others. We have only begun to fight the war against this virus - this is the time for people to STOP and give the medical community the chance to help us get through the problem.


    Two weeks in to my own "work from home" experience. Too many things that need a physical touch so I'm closer to 25% of my hours being "at home" with my "at work" time being done as far away from other employees as practical. Other people in my department do less physical touch work. Fortunately the business is essential so we have convinced vendors to continue to come on site and complete scheduled work - but for a couple of our vendors we are their only essential work and their businesses are shutting down when our projects are complete. My "social distancing" began three weeks ago limiting myself to public appearances (shopping, etc.) that were necessary. Seasonal allergies are the worse since every time one coughs or sneezes people jump out of their skin. I have never been as self conscious about sneezing as I am now.


    We will get through this. Financially won't matter for the millions who will die. There will be a financial rebound. Jobs will return. The families that lose their "breadwinner" will be more personally impacted by that person's death than the country's finances. At this point it is important to make sure that there are people (human beings) left at the end of this crisis.
     
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  3. Apr 4, 2020 #103 of 173
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    At this point there is no reason for the President or the top leaders to be "in public". I am surprised that press briefings are being held "in person". Keep the leaders in the situation room and teleconference to the press room, or better yet, to the homes and offices of the reporters present. The only reason I see for "in person" press briefings is either as a PR move to downplay the problem or out of a lack of respect for the seriousness of the problem.

    Now that the CDC is endorsing non-surgical cloth masks I hope more public figures who need to be in public will use them. But they should be worn with the understanding that they are not 100% effective against the virus. People still need to keep their distance, wash their hands, disinfect everything they touch and be cautious. A mask is not carte blanche to do whatever else one wants.
     
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  4. Apr 4, 2020 #104 of 173
    cpalmer2k

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    I think what peano is looking at is the same thing I've been considering... what is the end game here? The problem is states went into this with no plan to get out of it. Sure everybody wants to save as many lives as possible, but at what cost? If this were a hurricane and you were evacuating to keep people away from danger that would be one thing. But we've shut down the entire country with no end in sight. Nobody knows if this thing will really die down in the 2-4 weeks most places are "sheltering in place", or even if it does if it will just come back a few weeks later. This isn't like a hurricane where you evacuate the coast and return when it is gone. This thing has the potential to linger for 18-24 months until widespread vaccination is possible (if it even is then). What are we going to do if this doesn't go away, "shelter" for the next year and a half to two years like some medical "experts" have suggested?

    The "worst case" models estimate that had we done nothing the Pandemic would have killed roughly 2 million people (roughly 0.006042% of our 331 million people)
    before herd immunity and natural progression brought it to an end. I'm not saying we should automatically sacrifice 2 million people, but we're focused entirely on that minority of our population when we should be considering the other 99.99396% of it too. I'm all for a solution as peano suggested.. let those younger, less at risk get back to their daily lives. Issue Executive Orders or waivers that require businesses to accommodate at risk or more vulnerable populations for a time and offer them extended unemployment, grants, etc.

    This is a huge overreaction being driven by the fact that our health care system is too concerned with making a buck now and have cut corners for years. Most states estimate between 20-30% of a given population will require hospitalization during this Pandemic. If hospitals that make BILLIONS per year can't effectively care for that percentage of a population at a time then the lawmakers that allow them to operate in their state(s) should be asking lots of questions.
     
  5. Apr 4, 2020 #105 of 173
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    There are probably hospitals that are making money. Others are barely getting by. Hospitals live not off of the rates they set but by the amount of money they collect. Insurance companies and medicare/medicaid set the compensation levels. The insurance exchanges put in place over the past few years have drastically reduced compensation for hospitals.

    At this moment with nearly all the elective procedures shut down hospitals are shifting to more expensive to provide emergency care with less income to pay for the services. The more people ignore the problem, get sick and expect hospitals to save their lives the more overloaded the system becomes. Hospitals with limited resources based on normal demand can't instantly get additional supplies. The PPE and respirator shortages have shown that. There will be a day that people show up at the hospital and there will be nothing to do except warehouse them until they die. We can avoid that day by not getting sick.

    The "do nothing" prediction I found online is a cost of $13 trillion and 2 million ADDITIONAL deaths. The restrictions in place are predicted to cost $36 billion per week. Break even would be 361 weeks. Even at a higher weekly rate the math is on the side of saving lives.
     
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  6. Apr 5, 2020 #106 of 173
    peano

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    I agree with James' perspective in some ways and the "health experts" perspective in some ways.

    We need to remember all the people telling us not to worry about losing our jobs or home or business while we are in detention will never lose their job or home or business. They are frankly worried more about blame and liability. Not so much us.
     
  7. Apr 5, 2020 #107 of 173
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I thought I was on the side of "health experts" - at least the real ones with degrees and certifications in medicinal fields. The battle seems to be between "health experts" and "financial experts". The health community saying we can't survive physically without a shut down of business as usual until the curve flattens and the financial community saying we can't survive financially with a shut down of business as usual. Trading money for lives?

    On a professional level you are probably right. Salaried and endowed people who are more likely to be overworked during this crisis than lose work. Some politicians are openly worried about losing their jobs. There are plenty of "will never lose their job" people who have chosen the financial side of the battle. Most of them are also on the "less likely to die of the virus" list.

    On a "voices on the Internet" level we are probably seeing a separation between blue and white collar workers. The people living from paycheck to paycheck who are not getting a paycheck when their workplace closes or cuts back vs those who will continue to work and get paid.

    But demonizing the opposite viewpoint is never good. It is a simple fact that some people will lose their job and some will not - we don't need to demonize those who lose their jobs and want government assistance or those who keep their jobs or can weather a financial storm. Such divisions will tear the country apart more than a huge death toll or a huge debt toll.
     
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  8. Apr 6, 2020 #108 of 173
    steve053

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    This is an in depth explanation/lecture about COVID-19 | Corona Virus: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Diagnostics

     
  9. Apr 6, 2020 #109 of 173
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I'm glad you didn't describe it as "brief". :)
     
  10. Apr 6, 2020 #110 of 173
    steve053

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    It’s about an hour, but the first 10 to 20 minutes were the most informative for me.
     
  11. Apr 8, 2020 #111 of 173
    yosoyellobo

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    These face mask are driving me mad. Good thing I go out rarely.
     
  12. Apr 8, 2020 #112 of 173
    billsharpe

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    Gotta wear face masks when shopping in LA area now. I don't like them either because they fog up my glasses but I take the glasses off and put the mask on when in the grocery store.
     
  13. Apr 8, 2020 #113 of 173
    lparsons21

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    I was running out of beer! But today I found out the store can deliver that too, problem solved!! :)
     
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  14. Apr 8, 2020 #114 of 173
    TheRatPatrol

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    I heard you should wear eye protection as well.
     
  15. Apr 8, 2020 #115 of 173
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Eye protection helps keep your hands out of your eyes.
    Otherwise it only helps if people are spitting on you and the shield is big enough to keep it out of your eyes.
     
  16. Apr 8, 2020 #116 of 173
    TheRatPatrol

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    Well I heard it can last in the air for 3 hours if someone coughs or sneezes. So it could get into your eyes, nose and mouth (not sure about your ears). That’s why they’re saying to wear a mask and eye protection.

    But I don’t know....that’s just what I’ve heard......
     
  17. Apr 8, 2020 #117 of 173
    billsharpe

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    Best to stay home if at all possible.
     
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  18. Apr 8, 2020 #118 of 173
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Most people's idea of "eye protection" is about as protective as a bandana over your mouth. Placebo effect to make the wearer feel better while not providing much protection.

    Masks need to be properly fitted with no air leakage around the outside of the mask. Face shields need to cover the entire face. Airborne will still be a risk unless there is an airtight seal. But most people are not going into situations that are high risk. The current CDC recommended cloth mask combined with social distancing is enough for most environments.

    And be a prepper with enough food for several months and a job that can be worked from home. Avoid physical contact.

    People need to make their best effort - which can be difficult. Can you buy a two or three week supply of food with what you find on the shelves in your community? Or have the empty shelves and purchase limits led to multiple shopping trips per week? After two weeks it has been easier to find food on the shelves than the initial panic days. We are trying to make do with weekly trips for food. But it can be a challenge.
     
  19. Apr 9, 2020 #119 of 173
    scooper

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    2-3 times a week I make a grocery trip. if I need something from some other type of store, I try to combine trips, but I don't let the stay-at-home keep me from doing what I need to do. And I just have to get out on the motorcycle every so often to keep my morale up :) .
     
  20. Apr 9, 2020 #120 of 173
    NYDutch

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    The grocery stores near our Adirondack cottage seem to be fairly well stocked with food, so buying enough for 3-4 weeks hasn't been a problem, although brand choice can be limited. With what's in our freezers, we probably have at least a 2 months supply of food on hand. We still have some freeze dried meals on hand from our hiking days as well...
     

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