1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

How long do we think the satellite service will last?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by TDK1044, Jan 25, 2018.

  1. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    23,779
    1,253
    Nov 13, 2006
    I don’t think it’s just old people, and 58 is not 70’s either...

    And some people do not like changes often, while some do. And some people thinking having to surf through multiple sources to find one program is a lot more inconvenient than one source.. that is changing thank goodness, slowly but surely.

    You will never convince everyone that streaming is easier, nor that cable is easier. Most wont care and can figure out both... and will choose which is best for them that day.
     
    mjwagner likes this.
  2. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    23,779
    1,253
    Nov 13, 2006
    Ha! You know I’d love to hear all the people that think you Hague to have two or more DVRs explain how streamings one point of failure is ok but using a singe DVR is not. Especially for sports since I have never seen a sports program sit in an on demand que that you can grab latter...

    Someday yes this stuff may get worked out, but we are a ways away from that right now.
     
  3. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    23,779
    1,253
    Nov 13, 2006
    There’s several things they have added that absolutely make the experience better. Starting with the filters that are so simple to use in the playlist now. More lines in the guide... not as much as there should be, but there are some...
     
  4. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    30,024
    829
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    How about we 'assume' that I'm telling the truth when I say I see a better picture upscaling D*'s sat feeds than I do if I watch the same feeds on a good 1080p set? I don't say these things to justify purchasing the new technology, I'm talking about what I see. No amount of arguing is gonna change what I see. What I see is the best PQ I've ever had.

    Rich
     
  5. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    30,024
    829
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Let me go back to what I was saying about my first father in law again...he was 'old' when I met him. I met him when I was 15, he passed when I was 25. He was old when I met him and old when he passed. He was 57 the day of his death. My father was 10 years younger than him. My father was never 'old' the way my father in law was. I played catch with my father for the first time when he was 55 (how sad is that?) and it turned into 'show me what you got' and I did just that without a thought of harming him. No problems, he caught everything I threw at him. Can't begin to imagine doing that with an 'old' man. Like my first father in law, 'old' at 47. Get it?

    Liked everything else you wrote...:)

    Rich
     
  6. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    30,024
    829
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Google says: The Hague is a city on the western coast of the Netherlands and the capital of the province of South Holland. With a population of more than 1 million including the suburbs, it is the third-largest city in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam and Rotterdam. The Rotterdam The Hague Metropolitan Area, with a population of ...

    Somehow Tapatalk changed 'have' to 'Hague', capitalized it correctly and you let that slide...

    Back to the stuff that matters: There's always a single point of failure in just about anything if you wanna get really picky. I keep saying the only reason I still sub to D* is sports. I see YES on a couple CRSs. They might actually fit my needs better than D* does.

    Rich
     
  7. NashGuy

    NashGuy Member

    67
    7
    Jan 30, 2014
    Nashville, TN
    If they're just taking 1080i broadcast signals (which accounts for a lot of channels -- most everything not owned by Disney or Fox) and turning them into 1080p streams, that's not upscaling. It's just de-interlacing (which produces smoother motion), the same thing any "Full HD" 1080p TV does when its internal OTA tuner receives a local broadcast in 1080i. Unlike OTA tuners, streaming boxes and apps generally cannot accept interlaced streams, so everything pumped out by ALL streaming services -- DTV Now, Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, etc. -- is progressive scan.

    All that said, there's no reason to think that, say, CNN in 1080p looks better on DTV Now than it does in 1080i on DTV satellite, assuming that either your TV or Genie STB do a decent job of de-interlacing the 1080i signal.

    Now, if DTV Now is taking 720p broadcast signals (from, say, ESPN, Fox, ABC, etc.) and streaming them out at 1080p, that would be upscaling. But I seriously doubt they would do that. While their servers could probably do a marginally better job of upscaling 720p to 1080p than the average retail TV or streaming box, I can't see how that edge would justify the increased bandwidth costs for AT&T, given that 1080p requires over 50% more bandwidth than 720p.
     
  8. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    30,024
    829
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    What resolution does Hulu use? Hulu's picture never seems to be quite as good as NF or AP on my sets.

    Rich
     
  9. espaeth

    espaeth AllStar

    107
    8
    Oct 13, 2003
    720P / 30fps

    The key problem with the services that cut 60fps video down to 30fps is they tend to not do motion blur correction. The magic ratio is to have your camera shutter speed be double your frame rate, so for 30fps you’d have a 1/60 shutter speed, and for 60fps you’d have a 1/120 shutter speed. Services like Hulu and Sling drop every other frame, so you end up with 30fps but with a shutter speed of 1/120 (or 1/125). This results in not enough blur to compensate for the time between frames, so things start to look like stop motion videos.
     
  10. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    8,154
    872
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    What does this have to do with what I said? All I said was that upscaling once from the source will produce a better product than upscaling twice with an intermediate step along the way.

    I think NashGuy is right, all they are doing is de-interlacing the 1080i video because PCs/phones may not do a very good job of it themselves because they aren't designed to handle interlaced video. If so it isn't going to be any better than what it started out with, unless you watched on a very old (i.e. 10-15 years older or more) TV that doesn't deinterlace very well.
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    30,024
    829
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Thanx. Kinda figured it was in 720p. Probably why I don't use Hulu much.

    Rich
     
  12. NashGuy

    NashGuy Member

    67
    7
    Jan 30, 2014
    Nashville, TN
    I've never used Hulu with Live TV. But if you're talking about their original on-demand service, it uses a mix of 720p and 1080p. They're actually pretty quiet about what resolution they provide; nothing in the app lets you know which version of HD you're getting. But they did confirm awhile back that they stream at least some stuff in 1080p on this help page.

    Based on what I've seen (and what logically makes sense), I think they're streaming stuff from Fox and ABC (and their related cable nets) in 720p while stuff from NBC and other channels that originally broadcast in 1080i (e.g. Showtime, TBS, etc.) is streamed in 1080p. I also think they're doing Hulu Originals in 1080p (actually, many of them in 4K on XBox One and PS4) and probably movies as well.

    I remember the first time I watched a new episode of SNL through Hulu how stunned I was at the picture quality compared to my local OTA NBC affiliate (which broadcasts in 1080i). So I definitely think that's in 1080p, not 720p, since it was an improvement, not a downgrade, compared to the OTA station.

    I'll agree that, on average, Hulu's HD isn't as good as Netflix and Prime Video but it's still pretty good. With Hulu, it just seems to vary more from one show to another.
     
  13. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    23,457
    314
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    what about your opinion related to the topic; while it's clear you're on Hulu ;)
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    30,024
    829
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    I did some research yesterday and read what you linked to. Well, your post made me feel better about Hulu.

    Would be nice if my TVs gave me some indication of resolutions other than what the streaming boxes put out. I guess there's no way to do that. HBON (HBO NOW) seems to put out an almost excellent picture but not quite as good as what I see on NF or AP. What I read about HBON yesterday led me to believe that it outputs 720p, if that's true they do a great job with that rez. Kinda like what ESPN does with their 720p.

    Rich
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    30,024
    829
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Try this: Put 'define snarky' in the Google search box. Then reread what you posted above. Please.

    Rich
     
  16. NashGuy

    NashGuy Member

    67
    7
    Jan 30, 2014
    Nashville, TN
    I'm not sure what you mean. Are you pointing out that we're getting off-topic from the original purpose of this thread? Guilty as charged. But then that seems to typically happen on forum threads. Only so much to say on a topic, then folks start wandering down rabbit trails. :)
     
    Rich likes this.
  17. NashGuy

    NashGuy Member

    67
    7
    Jan 30, 2014
    Nashville, TN
    I agree. Getting info about the actual native stream itself (as opposed to whatever possibly upscaled resolution and bitrate that the box is outputting) is hard to do. On Apple TV I believe it's possible if you have a developer account. The YouTube app on many devices lets you see that kind of stream info through their "Stats for nerds" menu option.

    Hmm. I've never been thrilled with HBO's picture quality in either the HBO Now or HBO Go app (although it's still probably better than through the average cable system). It looks OK in "non-stressful" scenes but in difficult scenes, such as shadowy night scenes with subtle gradations, I always see quite a bit of compression artifacts. Same with the Showtime apps, although I'd rate them slightly better than HBO's. Both fall short of Netflix and Amazon's HD PQ. That said, I haven't had HBO since last summer when The Leftovers concluded (what a show!), so maybe they've upped their bitrate since then.
     
  18. CraigerM

    CraigerM Well-Known Member

    1,270
    46
    Apr 15, 2014
    St. Louis
    I found this article from Multichannel interesting:

    www.multichannel.com/news/content/att-ceo-we-re-very-bullish-video/417856

    Stephenson also offered some details about AT&T’s plans to introduce a new “home-centric” streaming device that will “repurpose” the company’s traditional linear TV platform.

    He said the new in-home offering will take the form of an inexpensive, “very thin client” that can be connected to any broadband service and include a voice-controlled interface. In addition to supporting DirecTV Now, it will also integrate access and search to other OTT services, including Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and YouTube, among others.

    "It also gives you a premium live video experience in your home with the flexibility and ease of use [that] you would expect out of an OTT service,” Stephenson said.

    “That [device] will actually drive cost structure of the traditional video product down, so that you can preserve margins in the traditional video as you grow in the over-the-top applications and video services,” he added.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018 at 7:13 PM
  19. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    23,457
    314
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    so, how it will affect sat broadcasting ?
     
  20. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    8,154
    872
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    Sounds like Directv Now with a Directv/AT&T branded client like the upcoming C71KW. Presumably they would still support BYOD like Apple TV etc. but those who are uncomfortable with managing their own technology like some older people might pay a little extra to have someone install it for them and come fix it if it stops working.
     

Share This Page