How To Diplex OTA with the AT9 dish & MPEG-4

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by Cap'n Preshoot, Aug 19, 2006.

  1. Aug 22, 2006 #21 of 323
    Cap'n Preshoot

    Cap'n Preshoot Godfather

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    1) any frequency below 750 Mhz "should" work.
    2) In the 2nd JPG (nice dwgs by the way) I think your OTA signals could or will conflict with any Ka signals which might be coincidentally present. Stick a BBC inline at the output of that multiswitch and you would (conceivably) solve the conflict, at least in theory.
    3) the only thing confirmed so far is death and taxes. Right now we don't know the answer to this.
    4) I'm guessing they will, no reason not to think they wouldn't manage the bandwidth spectrum the same way.

    I don't think anyone has yet proven that the idea will work with those receivers with built-in B-band convertors.
     
  2. Aug 22, 2006 #22 of 323
    bpayne

    bpayne Legend

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    1. Any frequency below the lower cutoff would work. Depending on the diplexer, it would be in the 850 mHz range.

    2.

    3. The HR20 comes with two BBCs in the box. The BBCs are a workaround until FTM comes out. I've said this so many times I wish we could make a sticky or something. :)

    4. No downconverting at the LNB- all the magic will happen at the FTM itself.
     
  3. Aug 22, 2006 #23 of 323
    cadjoe

    cadjoe Cool Member

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    Then, can we eliminate the need of MULTIPLE BBC's by putting the BBC in FRONT of the MultiSwitch ????

    Thanks,

    CadJoe
     
  4. Aug 22, 2006 #24 of 323
    Cap'n Preshoot

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    1) Which of course means you could just as easily diplex the entire CATV baseband into that slot if you were so inclined. Dunno why anybody would sub to both D* and cable, but I guess if you've got money to burn, why not?

    I could just hear the conversation now. "Hey dude check it out, I got my cable box and D* all running off 1 coax with a diplexer in it." ;)
     
  5. Aug 23, 2006 #25 of 323
    Cap'n Preshoot

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    Having not (yet) read anything about the FTM technology, appearances are that we've only got so much bandwidth in the coax before we pass the point of diminishing returns with ever higher frequencies and their inherent propagation problems through coax. (never mind those who fail to understand why you're not supposed to install RG6 with a staple gun) - that was a rhetorical comment, no reply necessary ;)

    Try as I may I have yet to fiind a cable manufacturer's official published spec on RG6 above 1000 Mhz. I've seen some Eagle/Aspen stuff "labelled" as being certified for 3 Ghz, to which my only comment is, yeah... right. You just know every spool of that stuff has been swept. Uh-uh..., yeah buddy.

    Coming time to consider some fiber transceivers and single mode fiber all the way to the dish.
     
  6. Aug 23, 2006 #26 of 323
    cbeckner80

    cbeckner80 Godfather

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    Because even though my signal strength shows in the 90's, I still loose my signal during even light rain, I like to know where the tornadoes are in my area during worse storms. Haveing had one take some trees down and remove my OTA antenna, and put my neighbors porch in my front yard years ago sort of makes you nervouse.

    Carl:eek2:
     
  7. Aug 23, 2006 #27 of 323
    carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Because I get basic cable with my high speed internet whether I want it or not, so I combine it with modulated security camera feeds, and modulated feeds from all my dvr's, and send the result to all my tv's in addition to the composite or s-video connections from D* equipment to the local tv. I do get several local cable channels that are not available from D* this way.

    Carl
     
  8. Aug 23, 2006 #28 of 323
    Cap'n Preshoot

    Cap'n Preshoot Godfather

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    Makes sense now. Forgot about the Cable modem subs, some get basic included, some don't.

    As for watching the weather, here in Houston if you have an SD Digital receiver or a D* HD receiver you can connect an OTA antenna and get full time 24/7 LOCAL doppler radar on both the local NBC and CBS stations on one of their digital subchannels. To me, living in hurricane country, that alone is worth the trouble to find some way to get your OTA signals into that receiver.
     
  9. Aug 23, 2006 #29 of 323
    Cap'n Preshoot

    Cap'n Preshoot Godfather

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    Rain fade? What's that?
    Kidding aside, if you haven't already, you might want to take a cruise through this thread:
    http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?t=61238
     
  10. Sep 9, 2006 #30 of 323
    Cap'n Preshoot

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    Yes it does.
    I finally got my new Mits 65732 the other day to replace my dead (under warranty) set and can attest that putting the BBC module in-line in the attic and diplexing my OTA signals in behind it (as described early in this thread) works perfectly.

    Of course you have to diplex into the individual cables rather than into the MultiSwitch, requiring some addt'l hardware, but the point is it works.
     
  11. Sep 9, 2006 #31 of 323
    Claus

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    This method is mention a few month ago in maybe this or another forum. Only drawback is you need separate diplexer for each line that has TV input. Still a very good idea and will make lots of people happy to get OTA. No problem with 2150 frequency from BBC down all of cable, AT9 is sending this down cable in most areas now. When AT9 topic comes up again we will try to convince bamtech how easy is to align if follow instructions!:)
    Claus
     
  12. Sep 10, 2006 #32 of 323
    Cap'n Preshoot

    Cap'n Preshoot Godfather

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    True enough. I was thrilled to find out it worked and how simple it was to do it. Diplexers are cheap.

    Promise me you won't fan those embers. :) :)
     
  13. Sep 10, 2006 #33 of 323
    Claus

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    Ok ok, enough is said. I try to be good.:rolleyes:
    Claus
     
  14. Sep 22, 2006 #34 of 323
    jaywdetroit

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    I've tried reading through this thread, and admit it's a bit confuzzing to me. I have an HR20 install date along with the new 5 LNB dish. My current setup is NO outdoor antenna and a DUAL LNB dish. I did my own installation and put the Multiswitch in the wall in my Family Room. (This was easiest). So I have two RG6 cables running from dish through my Garage attic and into my Family room into a Multiswitch which then runs lines out to the living room outlet and into the basement. I put my new HDTV in my Family room and would love to get OTR channels.

    Question: Assuming I buy a rooftop antenna: With my configuration, can I use a diplexer with the new dish and avoid running another RG6 line from the roof?

    Should I?

    How do I do it? Thanks!
     
  15. Sep 22, 2006 #35 of 323
    carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    jayw,

    You will face a couple of problems going from your current setup to the new one.

    First, the 5-LNB dish requires FOUR coax lines from the dish to the multiswitch. You can't make it work with just two. So as an absolute minimum you are going to have to run two additional lines.

    Because of the potential for frequency overlap with MPEG4 signals and OTA signals, and given that you will need additional coax runs anyway, I would recommend you pull FOUR NEW lines, which will leave the old two lines available for OTA. If the potential OTA antenna location is sufficiently different from the dish location, then as a minimum pull a new line for the OTA antenna in addition to the two new lines you will need for the dish.

    Carl
     
  16. Sep 22, 2006 #36 of 323
    jaywdetroit

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    Okay - thanks for the info.

    I guess I'm not suprised. The CSR at the retention line assured me that the multiswitch was built into the dish and that I would not have to run new lines. Oh well - they are covering it all. So I guess I'll just have him pull the new wires.
     
  17. Oct 5, 2006 #37 of 323
    cal87

    cal87 AllStar

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    I have hooked up my HR20 as per this thread. OTA diplexed into one of the lines AFTER the BBC. Seems to work fine. MPEG4 locals with no problems. No loss of signal strength versus the non-diplexed line.

    I have read this thread and am a little bit confused. As things are working fine with the MPEG4 locals, is this setup good to go? When the new satellites are up, are they going to be broadcasting at a frequency that might cause a problem that is not there now?
     
  18. Oct 6, 2006 #38 of 323
    carl6

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    I believe that is what is expected to cause the problem. We'll know for sure sometime next year. For now, you appear to be good to go.

    Carl
     
  19. Oct 6, 2006 #39 of 323
    cal87

    cal87 AllStar

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    Does anyone know for sure if there will or will not be a problem?
     
  20. Oct 7, 2006 #40 of 323
    bobnielsen

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    Bainbridge...
    Since they apparently haven't used that combination of frequencies yet, no. It depends somewhat on the specs of the BBC, which I don't think have been published. Does anyone know how the BBC is switched on (presumably by the receiver)?
     

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